Tag Archives: diet

Gluten-Free Diet Awareness Month

Gluten-Free Diet Awareness Month

It’s Gluten-Free Diet Awareness Month. Gluten-free diets are commonly used to treat Celiac disease, sensitivities, and allergies. If you or your loved ones need this kind of diet, these recipes can help this holiday season.

First up is a transformed comfort food, Gluten-Free Zucchini Chicken Parmesan Bundles.

Gluten-Free Zucchini Chicken Parmesan Bundles

Gluten Free Zucchini Chicken Parmesan Bundles

 

Gluten-Free Gingerbread Oatmeal is ideal for family gatherings during the holidays.

Gluten-Free Gingerbread Oatmeal
Image and Recipe via The Blissful Balance

 

Whip up a perfect fall dinner with this Gluten-Free Vegetarian Pumpkin Chili.

Gluten-Free Vegetarian Pumpkin Chili
Image and Recipe via The Conscientious Eater

 

This Gluten-Free Creamy Mushroom Risotto makes an impressive light dinner for guests.

Creamy Mushroom Risotto (Vegan + GF)

 

Lighten up grab-and-go breakfast with these Gluten-Free Pumpkin Muffins.

Gluten Free Paleo Pumpkin Muffins with Almond Flour

 

Making pasta at home doesn’t have to be a challenge! Try Gluten-Free Ravioli with Spinach and Cheese.

Gluten-Free Ravioli with Spinach and Cheese:

Gluten Free Ravioli with Spinach and Cheese

 

These soft Healthy Gluten-Free Pumpkin Cookies will be a hit this holiday season.

Healthy Gluten Free Pumpkin Cookies

National Breastfeeding Month

National Breastfeeding Month

It’s National Breastfeeding Month, and we had more information and tips about breastfeeding for new and expectant moms all week long.

What can breastfeeding do for you and your baby? Learn more.

Why Breastfeed?

 

Everything you need to know about breastfeeding in one handy guide.

Your Guide to Breastfeeding

 

For many women, pumping and storing breast milk is key to going back to work after they have a baby. Learn more about the basics of pumping breast milk.

How to Pump & Store Breastmilk

 

If you’re a new mom, you might not know these surprising facts about nursing your newborn.

Your Newborn and Breastfeeding

 

If you’re struggling to produce milk but still want to breastfeed, these natural ways to boost milk production could help.

If you’re a breastfeeding mom, your diet is still very important! These foods can help you get the nutrients you need.

What You Need for Healthy Breastmilk

 

Natural disasters can be especially hard on you and your baby if you’re breastfeeding. Have a plan in case of emergency.

Planning for Disasters While Breastfeeding

Hemochromatosis Screening Awareness Month

Hemochromatosis Screening Awareness Month

It’s Hemochromatosis Screening Awareness Month, and hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder where your body accumulates too much iron.

Patients usually don’t show serious signs until they’re over 40 years old, so it’s important to get screened in routine blood tests.

Hemochromatosis is especially common in those from European ancestry, affecting approximately 1 in 400 of them. Talk to your doctor about when you should be screened.

Blood Test Screenings

 

If you suffer from hemochromatosis, your body absorbs too much iron from your diet, as much as 4x too much, and since your body only has a few ways to get rid of iron, it accumulates over time in your liver, bones, joints, pancreas, and skin.

Getting Screened for Hemochromatosis

 

The extra iron in your system can cause organ damage, and iron deposits can darken your skin. It can also increase your risk of diabetes, heart attack, arthritis, and some cancers.

Risks of Hemochromatosis

 

The wrong level of iron in the brain has been tied to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis.

Brain Disease and Hemochromatosis

 

Symptoms of hemochromatosis include chronic fatigue, joint pain, especially in your knuckles, memory fog, an irregular heartbeat, and abdominal pain.

Hemochromatosis Symptoms

 

Getting iron levels down with therapeutic blood removal, or phlebotomy, is the most common treatment. Regular blood donations and a hemochromatosis-friendly diet can help you lower iron levels.

Hemochromatosis Treatment

National Arthritis Awareness Month

National Arthritis Awareness Month

May is National Arthritis Awareness Month, and arthritis is America’s number one cause of disability. There are also nearly 1 million hospitalizations each year because of arthritis.

Coping with Arthritis

 

Nearly 53 million adults and almost 300,000 babies, kids, and teens have arthritis or a rheumatic condition. Learn more about arthritis.

People with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis miss 172 million days of work per year. Learn about the different kinds of arthritis and be prepared.

Fighting Back Against Arthritis

 

Many people with arthritis also have other serious conditions. 57% of adults with heart disease, 52% of those with diabetes, and 44% of those with high blood pressure, have arthritis. Learn more about arthritis research.

Struggling with Arthritis and Health Conditions

 

1/3 of adults with arthritis who would normally be working have limitations in their ability to work, and overall, they’re less likely to be employed than those without arthritis. If you have arthritis, learn more about managing your pain.

Arthritis & Work-Life Limitations

 

Arthritis and its related conditions account for over $156 billion in yearly lost wages and medical expenses. If you have arthritis though, you have treatment options.

The Cost of Arthritis

 

If you need support emotionally or the tools and resources to make healthy changes like exercise and diet that can improve your arthritis, the Arthritis Foundation can help.

The Arthritis Support You Need

Defeat Diabetes Month

Defeat Diabetes Month

It’s Defeat Diabetes Month. 9.4% of Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t even know they have it.

Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over 65 years old. Managing your diabetes is even more important as you age.

Managing Diabetes As You Age

 

The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

Diabetes 101

 

If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood sugar, exercise, and diet change can all help you manage your disease long-term.

Treating Diabetes

 

These resources are packed with lifestyle tips that can help you make smart day-to-day choices when you have diabetes.

Around the Web: Your Healthy Lifestyle for Diabetes

 

Diabetes can lead to more health problems, like heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and more.

Preventing More Serious Diabetes Complications

 

Curious about the history of diabetes? Learn more about how humans have made sense of it through the years.

The History of Diabetes

Heart-Healthy Recipes

Heart-Healthy Recipes

For American Heart Month, these heart-healthy recipes will help you lighten up your diet at any age.

Skip the drive-thru with flavorful Egg White, Spinach, and Feta Breakfast Sandwiches.

Egg White, Spinach, and Feta Breakfast Sandwiches
Image and Recipe via From Playdates to Parties

 

Skip the appetizer with this Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Chicken for dinner.

Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Chicken

 

This Blackberry Glazed Salmon is so beautiful that no one will guess you’re trying to eat healthy.

Blackberry Glazed Salmon

 

Lighten up the classic with this Creamy Avocado Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad for lunch.

Creamy Avocado Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad

 

Do snacking with a sweet tooth right with these Apple Cinnamon Cookie Energy Bites.

Apple Cinnamon Cookie Energy Bites

 

Skip the temptation of chips and margaritas and make these Baked Chicken Chimichangas at home instead.

Baked Chicken ChimichangasImage and Recipe via The Girl Who Ate Everything

 

Curl up on the couch on cold nights with this Heart-Healthy Turkey Chili.

Heart Healthy Turkey Chili

Go Red for Heart Health

Long View: You Can’t Beat a Healthy Heart or 6 More Weeks of Winter

Just when you think the holidays are over and the thrill of the new year has finally tapered down, here comes February — Groundhog Day, Super Bowl Sunday, Mardis Gras, Valentine’s Day, and Presidents Day. February is a multi-themed, food-filled month of celebration.

We anticipate the shadow reveal of Punxsutawney Phil, we break out the football-shaped cheese ball to root for our team, we plan our menu of anything and everything on Fat Tuesday, and if that isn’t enough, we love to eat chocolates on the day of love. Then when it’s all over (and after a slight weight gain), we hit the mall for some comfy stretch wear with Presidents Day sale bargains!

But wait, how about doing something this month to celebrate our health and focus on our heart? If we can take advice from a small woodchuck about the weather, we surely can take advice from the American Heart Association about our health!

February is American Heart Month, and part of that is National Wear Red Day. For those of you who know me, my wardrobe pretty much consists of drab colors and neutrals, but this year, I broke out my red floral scarf for a splash of color as a symbol of support!

The American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute encourage all of us to take action against this killer disease. Studies show that 80% of cardiac and stroke events may be preventable with education and action.

Find time to talk to your family and get everyone on board with heart health. Encourage healthy eating habits by making healthier versions of your favorite food. Choose foods and recipes low in sodium and with no added sugar or trans fats. When you shop, buy colorful fruits and vegetables, which are all powerhouses when it comes to nutrition, and stay away from dairy and meat products that are high in fat.

Fiber is important in your diet, and you can find fiber not only in fruits and vegetables, but also in beans, nuts, and whole grain. Take the time to read the nutrition labels on items, and check out the sodium content. (A general rule is, if anything has more than 250 mg of sodium, you may want to search for something with less.)

Physical activity can also help you stay heart healthy. It’s not only what you put into your body, it’s also what you put out. Exercise helps to improve heart health, and it can even help reverse certain heart disease risk factors. Our heart becomes stronger from exercise, which helps it pump more blood through the body and work at maximum level without strain.

Aerobic activities at least 3 to 4 times a week are the best. Choose walking, swimming, or biking, and allow for a good 5 minutes of stretching beforehand to warm up your muscles and a cool down period after you’re through. And of course, always check with your doctor before starting any new physical routine.

So this February, maybe forego indulging in lavish holiday food choices (remember that New Year’s resolution?) and celebrate in a new way. Go out and buy something red to wear to celebrate heart health AND 6 more weeks of winter, or will it be an early spring? Better check with Punxsutawney Phil before you go!

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.