Tag Archives: diet

Heart-Healthy Recipes

Heart-Healthy Recipes

For American Heart Month, these heart-healthy recipes will help you lighten up your diet at any age.

Skip the drive-thru with flavorful Egg White, Spinach, and Feta Breakfast Sandwiches.

Egg White, Spinach, and Feta Breakfast Sandwiches
Image and Recipe via From Playdates to Parties


Skip the appetizer with this Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Chicken for dinner.

Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Chicken


This Blackberry Glazed Salmon is so beautiful that no one will guess you’re trying to eat healthy.

Blackberry Glazed Salmon


Lighten up the classic with this Creamy Avocado Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad for lunch.

Creamy Avocado Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad


Do snacking with a sweet tooth right with these Apple Cinnamon Cookie Energy Bites.

Apple Cinnamon Cookie Energy Bites


Skip the temptation of chips and margaritas and make these Baked Chicken Chimichangas at home instead.

Baked Chicken ChimichangasImage and Recipe via The Girl Who Ate Everything


Curl up on the couch on cold nights with this Heart-Healthy Turkey Chili.

Heart Healthy Turkey Chili

Go Red for Heart Health

Long View: You Can’t Beat a Healthy Heart or 6 More Weeks of Winter

Just when you think the holidays are over and the thrill of the new year has finally tapered down, here comes February — Groundhog Day, Super Bowl Sunday, Mardis Gras, Valentine’s Day, and Presidents Day. February is a multi-themed, food-filled month of celebration.

We anticipate the shadow reveal of Punxsutawney Phil, we break out the football-shaped cheese ball to root for our team, we plan our menu of anything and everything on Fat Tuesday, and if that isn’t enough, we love to eat chocolates on the day of love. Then when it’s all over (and after a slight weight gain), we hit the mall for some comfy stretch wear with Presidents Day sale bargains!

But wait, how about doing something this month to celebrate our health and focus on our heart? If we can take advice from a small woodchuck about the weather, we surely can take advice from the American Heart Association about our health!

February is American Heart Month, and part of that is National Wear Red Day. For those of you who know me, my wardrobe pretty much consists of drab colors and neutrals, but this year, I broke out my red floral scarf for a splash of color as a symbol of support!

The American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute encourage all of us to take action against this killer disease. Studies show that 80% of cardiac and stroke events may be preventable with education and action.

Find time to talk to your family and get everyone on board with heart health. Encourage healthy eating habits by making healthier versions of your favorite food. Choose foods and recipes low in sodium and with no added sugar or trans fats. When you shop, buy colorful fruits and vegetables, which are all powerhouses when it comes to nutrition, and stay away from dairy and meat products that are high in fat.

Fiber is important in your diet, and you can find fiber not only in fruits and vegetables, but also in beans, nuts, and whole grain. Take the time to read the nutrition labels on items, and check out the sodium content. (A general rule is, if anything has more than 250 mg of sodium, you may want to search for something with less.)

Physical activity can also help you stay heart healthy. It’s not only what you put into your body, it’s also what you put out. Exercise helps to improve heart health, and it can even help reverse certain heart disease risk factors. Our heart becomes stronger from exercise, which helps it pump more blood through the body and work at maximum level without strain.

Aerobic activities at least 3 to 4 times a week are the best. Choose walking, swimming, or biking, and allow for a good 5 minutes of stretching beforehand to warm up your muscles and a cool down period after you’re through. And of course, always check with your doctor before starting any new physical routine.

So this February, maybe forego indulging in lavish holiday food choices (remember that New Year’s resolution?) and celebrate in a new way. Go out and buy something red to wear to celebrate heart health AND 6 more weeks of winter, or will it be an early spring? Better check with Punxsutawney Phil before you go!

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.

World Cancer Day

Covered Bridge: One Day, Awareness for All

It’s likely that we’ve all known or come across at least one individual who has touched our lives with their empowering story. What do I mean by empowering story, you ask?

I mean the story of a family member, friend, fellow co-worker, or acquaintance that leaves a chill in your bones when you listen to how hard they fought. The kind of story that leaves a lasting impression on how you view life. One that alters who you are, even just a little. And one that proves, when faced with hardship, struggles, and even death, these individuals gave it all they have. Their fight can come from something greater than any of us can imagine, a love of life so great that fighting to beat it is the only choice they have.

You see, February 4 was World Cancer Day, which is meant to raise awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment. World Cancer Day was founded by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) to support the goals of the World Cancer Declaration. We regularly hear about different months dedicated to raising awareness about certain types of cancer, but World Cancer Day is awareness for all cancers.

Here at Reid Health Alliance Medicare, we highly encourage you to get preventive care, keep yourself healthy and educated about cancer, and have the tools to keep the ones you love in the know.

Here are a few tips to protect yourself from cancer from WorldCancerDay.org:

  • Quit smoking. Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of cancer. Quitting at any age can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life.
  • Maintain a healthy weight and make physical activity part of your everyday life. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of bowel, breast, uterine, ovarian, pancreatic, esophagus, kidney, liver, advanced prostate, and gallbladder cancers. Specific changes to your diet, like limiting red or processed meat, can also make a difference.
  • Reduce your alcohol consumption. Limiting alcohol can help decrease the risk of mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, bowel, liver and breast cancer.
  • Protect your skin. Reducing exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun and other sources, like tanning beds, can help reduce the risk of many skin cancers.

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Pregnancy Diet and Exercise

Pregnancy Diet and Exercise

Taking care of yourself with a healthy pregnancy diet and exercise routine is an important part of a healthy pregnancy overall. These tips can help you plan a balanced diet, exercise routine, and more.

Eat a Balanced Diet

While it’s normal to have crazy cravings while you’re pregnant, it’s also important to get plenty of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. Together, you and your baby have different nutritional needs than you do separately.

It’s less like eating for 2, and more like eating for yourself and 1/8. You’ll need to get around an extra 300 calories a day. For example, if you’d normally drink a 10-oz. glass of juice, now you should drink an 11- or 12-oz. glass.

Most pregnant women need about:

  • 1,800 calories per day during the first trimester
  • 2,200 calories per day during the second trimester
  • 2,400 calories per day during the third trimester

ChooseMyPlate.gov can help you make the right food choices, and you can enter in your info to create customized daily food recommendations in a helpful checklist for each stage of your pregnancy.

You should also be careful when eating out because you’ll be more susceptible to foodborne illness while you’re pregnant.

Take a Prenatal Vitamin

Pregnant women need more folic acid, iron, and calcium. Folic acid, a B vitamin, can help prevent birth defects of the brain and spinal cord when taken early in your pregnancy.

Take a multivitamin with 400 micrograms of folic acid every day during early pregnancy as part of a healthy diet. Avoid any supplements that give you more than 100% of the daily value for any vitamin or mineral.

Keep Moving

While you may not always feel like it, moderate exercise for 30 minutes a day during pregnancy can benefit both you and your baby. It helps you prepare your body for labor, and it will help you feel better before and after birth.

Safe Exercises to Try

  • Walking
  • Riding a stationary bike
  • Yoga
  • Pilates
  • Swimming
  • Water aerobics

Activities to Avoid

  • Bouncing
  • Leaping
  • Too much up and down movement
  • Exercise that could make you lose your balance
  • Laying flat on your back after the first trimester
  • Anything where you could get hit in the stomach
  • Sitting in saunas, hot tubs, or steam rooms

Always talk to your doctor before starting an exercise routine, drink plenty of water, don’t get overheated, and be sure to listen to your body.

Handy Apps

National Fresh Squeezed Juice Week

National Fresh Squeezed Juice Week

It’s National Fresh Squeezed Juice Week, and adding freshly squeezed juices to your diet can be a great way to get more vitamins and nutrients from fruits and veggies.

First up, Glowing Skin Green Juice sweetened by apple is great for staying hydrated.

Glowing Skin Green Juice


Make this Super Healthy Vegan Orange Julius at home for a healthy treat.

Super Healthy Vegan Orange Julius
Image and Recipe via Vegan Vigilante


This refreshing Anti-Inflammatory Juice will have you dreaming of warmer weather.

Fresh Anti-Inflammatory Juice


Beautiful pink Beet Ginger Detox Juice is perfect for sneaking more veggies into your kids’ diets.

Image and Recipe via The Harvest Kitchen


Get your daily dose of Vitamin C with this green Fresh Kiwi-Grape Juice.

Fresh Kiwi-Grape Juice
Image and Recipe via Martha Stewart


Lighten up your lemon and feel like you’re at the spa with this Cleansing Cucumber Lemonade.

Cleansing Cucumber Lemonade


Help your immune system be prepared for winter colds with an extra dose of Vitamins A and C in Winter Vitamin-Boosting Juice.

Winter Vitamin Boosting Juice

Exercise Just Right for You

For Providers: Talking Exercise with Patients

Exercise has been a part of daily life for John Kim, a Carle family nurse practitioner, from an early age, but he realizes that’s not the case for everyone.

Kim, who started at Carle in 2015, stresses the importance of exercise with all of his patients.

“I talk about exercise consistently to every patient because not only can it treat comorbidities, but it can also prevent future illness and disease,” Kim said. “I believe exercise along with diet is the foundation of health, and so I make it a priority to talk about exercise with each patient.”

He treats exercise like a vital sign, having his certified medical assistant ask all patients if they exercise and how much.

“Asking about exercise as a vital sign has made it extremely easy to bring up the topic of exercise to each patient,” he said.

Kim offers his patients advice about how to get started if they’re new to exercise and offers ways to increase physical activity if they aren’t active enough. He caters each plan to each patient’s individual interests and lifestyle and tries to help them take one small step at a time.

“If I have a patient that is completely sedentary, I will find out what his or her interests are and try to tailor some kind of physical activity from that,” Kim said. “I try to shoot for my patients to start off with a number they know they can do, whether it’s 5 minutes or 20 minutes a day.”

He also has patients fill out exercise logs to help hold them accountable and initially follows up with them every 2 weeks or once a month until exercise becomes more routine.

Through it all, he’s learned that being patient and nonjudgmental is key.

“New habits take time to build,” he said. “So I make sure patients know that I am not here to ridicule them, but to encourage and support them as they try to build the new habit of exercising. I have found that when patients know that their provider genuinely cares about their health, it gets to the point where it motivates the patients to push themselves a little more, and I believe this is why I have many success stories of patients going from a sedentary lifestyle to a more active lifestyle.”

Key Takeaways

  • Discuss exercise along with vital signs for every patient.
  • Be patient about results, and don’t ridicule.
  • Set attainable goals with small steps.
  • Follow up frequently until exercise becomes a habit.
  • Have patients use exercise logs and bring them to each appointment
Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month

November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, and we’re helping you learn more all week. Test your knowledge and get the facts.

Your Pancreas Knowledge


Your pancreas is a gland in your abdomen that helps with digestion and blood sugar regulation. Know your pancreas.

Your Pancreas


Signs of pancreatic cancer include abdominal or mid-back pain, weight loss and loss of appetite, nausea, jaundice, and a new onset of diabetes.

Signs of Pancreatic Cancer


Your risk of pancreatic cancer is based on your family history, diet, race, gender, age, and smoking and can go up if you have obesity, diabetes, or chronic pancreatitis. Are you at risk?

Risk of Pancreatic Cancer


Take the pledge to demand better for pancreatic cancer patients and go purple to raise awareness.

Spread the word, host a purple party, talk to your elected officials, register for PurpleStride, and more to make a difference.

Host a Purple Party