Tag Archives: December

Older Driver Safety Awareness Week

Older Driver Safety Awareness Week

It’s Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, and the ability to drive safely can be affected by changes in our physical, emotional, and cognitive health. Although these changes are part of normal aging, they can affect each individual at different rates.

Just as one plans for retirement, it’s important to plan for your transportation needs.

Planning for Future Transportation

 

December is the perfect time to have a conversation with loved ones as you come together for the holidays.

Talking to Family About Driving As They Age

 

When an older driver decides it’s time for a check-up, useful driving fitness education tools can help identify challenges and help them adjust.

Evaluate Your Ability to Drive As You Age

 

Driving intervention plans, drawn up between a client and therapist, can help older individuals drive safely for as long as possible.

When someone needs to adjust to keep driving or can no longer drive, family and friends can help with resources for independent transportation in the community.

Planning for a Future Without Driving

 

Exploring alternative types of transportation can help older adults stay independent. Options can include community networks, public transit, and ride sharing apps.

Resources to Stay Independent

 

Vision problems and certain medications can also cause issues driving early. Talk to your doctor to get help.

Health Issues and Driving As You Age

Family Time for the Holidays

Covered Bridge: If Only Time Stood Still

As a child with a birthday in December (of course shortly followed by Christmas), I can say I always wished the first part of December away. I was so excited about all the festivities to come that I merely wanted the days to pass until the real excitement began.

Even though I share a birthday with my twin sister and some of our presents consisted of sharing, I wanted nothing more than to see what gifts we might receive for our birthday. Fast forward 10 days, and all we wanted to see were the gifts we would receive for Christmas, hoping not to have to share those.

That’s usually the way kids work, right?

Now, as an adult, my daughter’s birthday is 2 days from mine, which means I care less about what I get and more about what we get to do for her. My husband and I rarely get gifts for one another. We find much more joy in giving to others than receiving ourselves.

These days, we look forward to making cakes for birthdays and favorite meals for our kids. We look forward to family coming to town to visit and trying our best to get thoughtful gifts for them that we hope they’ll enjoy.

We enjoy the extra company and chaos that ensues with it. We spend more time sitting around the table chatting with family and less time worrying about the cleanup of a meal we spent most of the day preparing. After all, it will be there tomorrow. Our family may not be.

It’s also important to remember that while some of us think of joy and family during the holiday season, others feel isolation and anxiety, and the shorter, darker days and cold weather don’t help. We often forget about those who may be living alone. I encourage you this holiday season to take an extra moment to make time for the ones who may need it more than you know.

During the holidays, which is oftentimes the only time we get to be with distant family, take the extra time to not worry about what can be put off until tomorrow. Spend it talking, communicating, and interacting. We rush through life as children to get to the next exciting moment, but what if the most exciting moments now are the ones shared over a meal and simple conversations?

Happy Holidays!

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Hot Cocoa and Winter Health Risks

Long View: Cold Hands, Hot Cocoa

I always remember December from my childhood, when the weather got subzero, and the wind was playfully whipping snowflakes around. School was out for the holidays, and my sister and I always loved to play outdoors, despite the frigid temperatures.

We would come downstairs with our garb, and Mom would get us all bundled up to brave the weather. Snowsuits, scarves, hats, gloves, and boots were standard outerwear those days. My mom would secure the scarf so that it would stay put, and the hat would cover my ears and my forehead. When she was through, I could barely see and hardly move.

I remember stiffly walking out the door, hoping that with more movement, I would loosen up enough to enjoy some of the winter wonderland we called our yard. Hot cocoa would be waiting for us when we came in, and it was like magic what that cup of warmth could do!

Today, I run out of the house without a coat, hat, gloves, or scarf, thinking, I’m just going to the car, then running in to work. My days of bundling up are over. This is what happens when you go from 6 years old to 60. But honestly, what am I thinking?

Winter health risks should be a concern for our aging population. (Hey, that’s me too!) The most obvious risk is the weather itself. Midwestern winters can consist of ice and snow. Driving is a challenge. Walking is even more of a challenge. Slips on ice are a major risk, so it’s important to wear the right shoes or boots with good traction if you have to go out.  

Hypothermia is also a common winter weather health risk. Hypothermia means your body temperature has fallen below 95 degrees, and once it gets to that point for a prolonged period of time, you can’t produce enough energy to stay warm.

Symptoms include shivering, cold pale skin, lack of coordination, slowed reactions and breathing, and mental confusion. It’s good to pay attention to how cold it is where you are, whether it’s indoors or outdoors. Also, make sure you’re eating enough to keep up a healthy weight. Body fat helps you stay warm.

Frostbite is another health risk during the winter months. Frostbite means your skin has been over-exposed to cold temperatures, and it usually affects the nose, ears, cheeks, fingers, and toes. It can be severe and cause permanent damage to the skin, and even progress to the bone.

Frostbite can affect anyone who is exposed to below freezing temperatures, in particular, those who aren’t wearing the right clothing. It’s important to wear layers, preferably 2 to 3 layers of loose-fitting clothing, as well as a coat, hat, gloves, and a scarf. Covering up your nose and mouth will also protect your lungs from the cold air.

As for drinking a cup of hot cocoa, well, that is a winter weather health benefit! According to a study at Cornell University, hot cocoa has almost twice as many antioxidants as red wine, and 2 to 3 times more than green tea! This winter, enjoy the magic of the season by keeping yourself safe and warm.

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.

Get a Safe Ride for National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month. As you get ready to celebrate the new year, make sure you’re prepared to get home safely, too.

Driving services like Lyft and Uber can get you home safely during the holidays.

Get Home Safe for the Holidays

 

In an average year, 30 million Americans drive drunk. Choose a designated driver before you go out.

Celebrate Smart

 

The holidays raise the risk. On average, 25 people were killed per day from alcohol-impaired driving in December 2010.

Buzzed Driving Stats

 

In December 2010, 21- to 34-year-olds were involved in more fatal alcohol-impaired crashes than any other age group.

11.8% of adults over age 26 drive drunk in a year. Call a cab, friend, or family member instead.

Safe Driving in the Holiday Season

 

19.5% of people 16 to 25 years old drive under the influence of alcohol. Talk to your kids about underage drinking.

Talk Underage Drinking

 

A DUI costs an average of $10,000. Uber rides cost just cents per minute.

Uber Instead

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Happy Kids from Safe Toys and Gifts Month

Safe Toys and Gifts Month

December is Safe Toys and Gifts Month, so we had tips each day to keep the little ones in your life safe this holiday season.

Make sure you check all of the gifts your kids get for age, skill level, and developmental level before they play with them.

Right Gift for the Right Age

 

Look for toy labels that say ASTM, which means it met the American Society for Testing and Materials safety standards.

Toy Labels

 

If you give sports equipment, give protective gear with it, like a skateboard with a helmet.

Safety with Sports Gear

 

AblePlay can help you choose toys that appeal to different senses like sound, movement, and texture with research and reviews.

Smart and Safe Gifts for Kids

 

Be careful with balloons, which kids can choke or suffocate on when they break and deflate.

Playing with Balloons Safely

 

Throw away plastic wrapping after gifts are opened, which can be a dangerous for little ones.

Always supervise battery charging and read the warnings on chargers to prevent burns or electric shock.

Supervision When Needed

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Finding Medicare During the Annual Enrollment Period

Vantage Point: The Season for Informed Choices

It’s October, and folks living in North Central Washington are looking forward to beautiful fall colors and freshly picked apples. For those on Medicare, it’s also the start of the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP), when beneficiaries can shop for their 2016 coverage. It runs October 15 to December 7. But because of confusing plan changes and choices, some dread the AEP rather than looking forward to it.

But there are people who can help make these decisions easier. A trusted resource for Medicare eligibility throughout the year is the Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (SHIBA) program. The SHIBA program was formed to help consumers understand Medicare and their options for supplementing it. SHIBA counselors keep client information 100% confidential, and their main mission is to help clients see Medicare plan comparisons so that the client can choose using unbiased and accurate information.

At educational presentations in the past, I’d learned a lot from Dick Anderson, a certified SHIBA counselor, and recently had the pleasure of meeting with him one-on-one. Hearing Dick describe some of his stories captured what a valuable service he and other advisors provide. Counseling to help others by these trained volunteers truly comes from the heart.

Dick says there’s no Medicare plan that’s right for everyone, so instead he tries to get his clients to talk about their individual needs. This helps him determine what’s most important to them, so they can make a measured choice that meets their personal needs.

The rewards for this work are illustrated by Dick’s powerful stories of people from all different backgrounds, incomes, and educational levels who have come to him heavy with feelings of helplessness and confusion and after meeting with him, left with their cloud of anxiety lifted.

At Health Alliance, we strive to have quality, sustainable Medicare plans, but we agree with Dick that there’s no perfect plan for every person’s needs. Therefore, we value and respect the work SHIBA volunteers do to help people make informed choices.

For current Health Alliance members, we’re holding special meetings the first week of October in Wenatchee, Moses Lake, and Omak about our 2016 benefits and to answer any questions.

If you want to meet with a SHIBA counselor, you can make an appointment by calling Community Choice at 1-888-452-0731 or Aging and Adult Care at 509-886-0700.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant and Okanogan counties in Washington. She has four adult sons and two grandsons. During her time off, she performs as part of a rodeo drill team on her horse, Skeeter.

Composing for Medicare Annual Enrollment Period

Long View: It’s Annual Enrollment Time

The Medicare Annual Enrollment Period starts on October 15. It’s the time of year when you can make changes to your Medicare Advantage plan. Plans can change premiums, copays, and formularies every year, so it’s important to review your coverage and see if it still suits your needs.

Medicare.gov is a great resource, as is your local senior center. You can also call Health Alliance at 1-888-382-9771 or TTY 711 (8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily from October 1 to February 14 and weekdays the rest of the year) or go to HealthAllianceMedicare.org for insight. Because I know this subject can be a little dry, I turned it into a poem from our vantage point. I hope you enjoy!

The chaos starts in mid-October.
Medicare says, “Think it over.”
The plan choice that you made last year,
It may be time to change and steer.

You stay at home most all the year.
Your children want you safe and near.
You dislike the awful weather.
HMOs might suit you better.

Maybe you’d like a PPO.
The freedom helps the snowbirds go,
To warmer climes away from ice.
So bon voyage! (It must be nice!)

Supplements can come in handy.
If you’re mobile, they are dandy.
Great if you like to get away,
If you are active day by day.

We brace for those who wait ‘til later.
Here’s our next procrastinator,
Frantic, stricken, and full of fear.
(Showing up late year after year.)

My co-workers have lost their voices.
December 7 ends your choices.
(And why’d they pick Pearl Harbor day?
It’s odd, I know, I just can’t say.)

We’re done, all is signed and dated.
You now feel somewhat elated.
No need to worry and have no fear,
We will be back again next year.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

 

Health Alliance Medicare is an HMO and PPO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Health Alliance Medicare depends on contract renewal.

med-AEPpoem-0815 | Y0034_16_35982 | Accepted