Tag Archives: costs

Grocery Shopping Fresh

Grocery Shopping Like a Pro

Even after you’ve gotten ready to head to the store, grocery shopping on a budget for healthy meals can be hard. But there are some things you can do to make it easier.

Stock Your Pantry

Keeping your kitchen stocked with certain key things can make cooking easy. This list has some items that are perfect for this. And this article has some healthy foods perfect for your pantry that only cost about $2.

Add one item that won’t go bad, like a spice, grain, beans, or frozen veggies to your cart each shopping trip to help you build your pantry without dropping a lot of money at once. (These are also good things to buy in bulk when they’re on sale if you have space to store them.)

Having this stocked pantry will help you throw together meals fast, help you save on packaged or premade meals you might’ve grabbed in a hurry, and make shopping easier.

Choosing Your Store

Choosing where you shop can also help you save. Besides the grocery store, some great places to find good deals are:

  • Ethnic markets
  • Dollar stores
  • Retail supercenters
  • Wholesale clubs
  • Farmers markets

At the Store

Once you’re at the store, you should try to shop the outer edge of it as much as possible. The outer edge usually has the fresh produce, like fruits and veggies, meat, dairy, bread, and frozen food. It’s typically the inner aisles that are full of boxed and processed foods.

Fruits & Veggies

It’s recommended that you eat 5 servings of veggies a day, so it’s important to really use that part of the store. With that in mind, fruits and veggies, fresh or frozen, should take up about a third of your cart on each shopping trip.

  • Shop in season 

At the farmers market, you have to buy what’s in season, but at the grocery store, there are lots of choices. But when you buy what’s in season, you can save a lot, and your food will be the tastiest and freshest it can be. This list can help you find what’s in season when.

  • Buy bags at the right time

With certain go-to things your family will always use, like apples, oranges, potatoes, and onions, buying them in the big bags when they’re in season can help you save even more.

  • Stock up on canned and frozen fruits and veggies

Canned and frozen fruits and veggies are picked while they’re in season and tasting best, and they’re good for you, too. So instead of buying fresh peas when they’re not in season, stock up on frozen ones to save and get the best flavor. Plus, they last much longer.

Look for frozen veggies without added sauces or butter. Choose canned fruit in 100% fruit juice and veggies with “low-sodium” or “no salt added.”

Canned veggies and broths are perfect for easy soups and stews, and canned fruit makes great fruit salad and snacks for the kids.

Packaged Goods

Avoid a lot of the packaged and processed foods in the center of the store. Cookies, candy, chips, crackers, and soda are all high in things you don’t want, like sugar, salt, and bad fats, and low in things like protein and nutrients. They’re also expensive.

  • Look for whole grains

Be careful you don’t get fooled by things that just call out wheat. Instead, look for whole grains and whole-grain breads.

  • Find high-protein foods besides meat

Yogurt and cheeses are great sources of protein, as are beans and other legumes, which you can find dried or canned.

  • Be smart about cereal

Cereals are one of the top foods for hidden sugar. Look for ones with little or no sugar. You can always add honey to flavor it in the bowl. Also look for cereals high in fiber to start your day right.

  • Try new things in the bulk aisle

If you want to try a new grain, nut, or dried fruit, the bulk aisle with bins is a great way to taste test. Scoop out a small bag for your family to taste before buying bigger servings.

Shopping Tips

Make the most of your trip by paying attention to how your store organizes things, their price tags, and food labels.

  • Don’t shop at eye level

Stores oftentimes stock the most expensive things right where they’ll catch your eye. Looking at the upper and lower shelves can help you find the best deal.

  • Grab from the back

Stores also stock from the back, putting newer things behind the older ones. Grabbing from the back gets you fresher food with better expiration dates, so your food will be good for longer.

  • Look for store brands

Many stores have their own brands of items, and in most cases, you’ll get the exact same or very similar thing at a much better price.

  • Read the label

Reading the nutrition label can tell you a lot about what’s in a food, if it’s good for you, and help you choose between brands.

  • Pay attention to serving sizes

Some things might seem good for you until you check the serving size. Sometimes the serving size is much smaller than what you’d actually eat in a sitting, which makes the numbers on the label look better.

  • Learn how to read unit price on the price tag

Unit price tells you how much something costs per pound, ounce, quart, or other unit of measure. It can tell you which brands are the most affordable. This guide can help you read or calculate unit price.

  • Have a calculator handy

Whether it’s on your phone or you bring a small calculator along to the store, having one on hand can make it easy to compare labels and costs.

Up Next:

Learn how to read and make sense of nutrition labels to get the most out of your food.

Community Care

Vantage Point: North Central Washington Cares

At a North Central Washington event I heard someone say, “Show me a community, a place where people care for their elders, and I will show you a good place to live.” Whether I am going to a senior networking forum in Chelan, Douglas, Grant, or Okanogan counties, conducting Medicare education, visiting one of our provider offices or collaborating on a fun event, I find NCW continues to grow as a place that recognizes, respects, and strives to enhance the quality of life for our seniors.

I recently had an opportunity to listen as Bruce Buckles, Aging and Adult Care of Central Washington’s executive director, presented on federal and state policies that impact seniors and adults with disabilities. Afterwards, I realized that with a rapidly aging population, as well as the daunting costs of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, it is more important than ever to support programs that care for and benefit the aging.

We can’t always control what happens with laws, but on the local level, it’s a privilege for Health Alliance Medicare to partner with lots of outstanding, proactive agencies in caring for our seniors.

This month, Health Alliance Medicare is honored to join many other Grant County senior networking agencies to hold the inaugural Columbia Basin All-Senior Expo and Picnic. The free event will include a catered lunch, fitness demonstrations, raffles, door prizes, education, and fun entertainment all to celebrate Grant County seniors.

I have a favorite saying, “Regard the small as important and make much of little,” so I was excited when I saw a toddler, just starting out in life, looking up at a stage taller than herself and mirroring the steps of seniors at a Stay Active and Independent for Life geriatric fall prevention class during a recent health fair.

May we always look up to our elders, recognize and respect what they have to teach us and remember we are also aging and have the power today to help strengthen our communities by making sure we have adequate resources, programs, and health care. If we can do that, there is no doubt NCW will continue to thrive as a good place to live and age.

Raising Skin Cancer Awareness

Skin Cancer Awareness Month

May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, and it is a subject that touches everyone’s lives.

1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer, no matter their skin color. This mini prevention handbook has tips to protect yourself:

The Mini Skin Cancer Prevention Handbook
Image via the Skin Cancer Foundation

 

Do you know the sign of a melanoma? Use this guide to check yourself:

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Image via the American Academy of Dermatology

 

Clothing can protect your skin from the sun, but is your style helping you? Find out:

Clothing: Your First Line of Defense
Image via the Skin Cancer Foundation

 

How is sunscreen actually protecting you and when should you wear one? Get answers:

Sunscreen Effect on Screen
Image via Visually

 

Choosing the right sunscreen matters, and the American Academy of Dermatology can help you figure out that label:

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Image via the American Academy of Dermatology

 

Protecting your eyes with sunglasses is important too. Get UV facts from the vision experts:

Protect Your Eyes From the Sun
Image via The Vision Council

 

Skin cancer has costs, and tanning increases your risk. Protect yourself and your kids:

Tanning Infographic
Image via MD Anderson Cancer Center

Save

Your Insurance Team's Support

Vantage Point: We Work Together to Support You

Painted in the stairwell of Samaritan Hospital is an inspirational message, “All of us, for each of you.” The same can be said of our Health Alliance Medicare team in North Central Washington that works together to provide elevated customer service for members and our provider partnerships.

Eileen, our program assistant, is the first face members see when they visit the Wenatchee office. Eileen feels that by supporting staff and prioritizing tasks, she can focus all her attention on members when they come in.

“Health Alliance isn’t just insurance coverage,” she says. “It is a place to come if you have questions, are seeking information, or would just like a cup of coffee and an ear.”

Jessica, our bilingual customer service representative, says, “The most rewarding part of my job is having the ability to see our members face to face, build relationships, and let them know I am here to listen and help.”

Through her role at Health Alliance, Teri, our customer service lead, hopes to insure our members only have good experiences when adverse situations arise. Teri credits the overall team from claims to medical management for its support in helping her achieve her goal.

Major procedures, hospitalization, surgeries, and discharge plans all need prior approval, and Cindy, our utilization review nurse on the medical management team, uses her experience in risk management, coupled with patient advocacy, to take care of our members through major health issues, thus controlling unnecessary costs.

Medicare is not only complicated for our members, it can be complicated for providers as well. Therefore, Leslie, our provider relations specialist, works directly with clinical staff members to help them understand policies, procedures, and operating systems. By providing face-to-face customer service at the provider offices, it makes providers’ jobs easier, positively impacting their care of our members.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services ranks Medicare Advantage plans on a five-star scale, and factors within that quality scale relate to providers assessing, managing, and controlling chronic conditions. Amanda, our coding consultant, works directly with physicians to provide coding education and finds it rewarding when she and the doctors learn something from each other, ensuring overall great health care to our members.

Whether they’re working with members or providers or making medical decisions behind the scenes, these are just a few of the local people committed to working together toward the common goal of ensuring quality of care, setting Health Alliance Medicare apart in North Central Washington.

Treatment Cost Calculator Savings

Take Control of your Healthcare Costs with our Treatment Cost Calculator

Today’s technology means that from airline tickets to driving routes, the power to choose is at our fingertips more than ever before. With Health Alliance’s new Treatment Cost Calculator, we extend that power to making healthcare choices, too.

This innovative tool lets you explore a wide range of options and decide for yourself where to go for care.

With the Treatment Cost Calculator you can easily:

• Review a helpful estimate of costs for specific treatments (based on your plan’s coverage)
• Compare costs for in-network and out-of-network providers
• Search by medical treatment, service, or condition
• Find doctors, hospitals, and clinics in your area

It’s a new era of patient power in health care. Try the Treatment Cost Calculator today, and feel better knowing you made an informed decision that works for you.

Log in at YourHealthAlliance.org to use the tool and learn more.

Affordable Care

Crunching Numbers for You

The Affordable Care Act is here to make health care affordable! Let’s run through some facts about the kinds of help you can get paying for your Health Alliance individual insurance plan, called premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies.

What’s a premium tax credit?

A premium is what you pay monthly to have insurance. A premium tax credit lowers your cost to make a plan affordable for you.

What is a cost-sharing subsidy?

A cost-sharing subsidy makes other health insurance costs affordable, like your deductible, coinsurance, and out-of-pocket max.

Who qualifies for help?

There’s a little math involved here. First, you need to know your individual or family income. If your income falls between 100% and 400% of the federal poverty level, you can get help from the government.

You can get government help if you’re…
An individual with a gross income* of $12,000-$46,000 a year
A family of four with a gross income of $24,000-$94,000 a year

*Gross income is everything you make in a year, before any taxes or deductions.

What’s the federal poverty level?

The federal poverty level depends on your family’s size. In 2013, it was $11,490 for a single adult and $23,550 for a family of four. You can make up to 4 times that amount and still get help!

How much help will I get?

Again, there’s a little math involved. A few tools online will do the math for you, or a Health Alliance rep can help find your subsidy amount. Call or stop by our Champaign location at 206 W. Anthony Drive, near Alexander’s Steakhouse—we’ll crunch the numbers for you.

How do I apply this help to my bill?

The only thing you have to do is pick a plan from the Public Marketplace. Any public plan will let you apply for government help. The government deals directly with us after you enroll to apply its help to your bill.

What can I do if I don’t qualify for help, but I still don’t have a lot of money? 

  1. Think about your individual risk. Your individual risk is the plan’s medical deductible added to the out-of-pocket max. This is the most you’ll have to pay (besides the monthly premium,) before a plan will cover 100% of your costs. What are you OK with paying if the worst were to happen?
  2. Pay attention to a plan’s deductible and out-of-pocket max. The higher your deductible and out-of-pocket max, the lower your monthly premium. Keep in mind that if you get sick or hurt, you will have to pay for all your medical costs until you meet your plan’s deductible.
  3. Call or stop by. It’s not a sign of weakness. It’s smart. When you need medical advice, you call the doctor. When you need health insurance insight, you talk to our helpful reps.