Tag Archives: communication

Better Hearing and Speech Month

Better Hearing and Speech Month

May is also Better Hearing and Speech Month, and we had education for you all week.

Your balance and risk of falling are tied to your inner ear, so ear infections, inner ear disorders, and objects in your ear can actually make you fall. Audiologists can help.

Your Ears and Falls

 

As a parent, do you know the early warning signs of speech, language, and hearing disorders? 

The Signs of Communication Disorders

 

Make sure you know how to recognize the signs of a communication disorder.

 

If your child is falling behind, you may want to have their hearing checked.

Hearing Loss & Academic Achievement

 

Hearing loss affects sentence structure and speech development.

Hearing Loss and Sentence Structure

 

If your child doesn’t use these sounds or letters, talk to their doctor about a hearing test.

Hearing Loss and Speech

 

Hearing loss makes learning vocab even harder for children.

Hearing Loss and Vocabulary

Tough Talks to Plan for the Future

Covered Bridge: Tough Talks Now Can Save Hurt Feelings Later

Have you ever noticed how much stuff you have packed in your house? It seems to have a life of its own! There was a point where I thought, “If I bring one more thing home, something will pop out of a window.” The thought of moving with all these treasures in tow is daunting.

Now imagine if you had to do so without notice or against your wishes. That would be a nightmare.

Sadly, I remember that a few short years ago, when my grandpa was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, his primary care doctor told him and my grandmother that it was time to downsize from their 4-bedroom home on 15 acres in the country to something a little more manageable.

He felt a part of his independence was being taken from him. But fortunately for him, being newly diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, he had a little more say in his plans for the future.

I am sure some of you have older friends and family members who could find themselves in that situation or worse. At some point, they might not have a say in their future and need to transition suddenly from independent living to a group or assisted-living facility, whether the move is short-term or permanent.

It seems that talking about this tough situation ahead of time could save everyone a lot of pain later.

There are some early signs that it is time to talk about moving options. A change might be in order if they have trouble getting dressed or making their own food. Sudden changes in behavior or severe forgetfulness are more alarming and require fast action to protect your loved one.

Help your friends or loved ones have this conversation with their primary care doctors to assess their needs and their next steps and to make the process as easy and stress-free as possible.

There you have it. And it wouldn’t hurt for all of us to plan for the future by simplifying our lives and possessions as we go along!

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Emotional Wellness Month

Emotional Wellness Month

October is Emotional Wellness Month. Emotional wellness means you know how to handle and express your feelings in a positive way and to drive positive change in your life.

Having emotional intelligence is an important part of putting your emotional wellness to work in your professional life. Learn to make the most of it.

Emotional Intelligence at Work

 

Expressing your feelings with respect through open communication, something you develop through emotional wellness, can help you build good relationships.

Communicating Your Way to Good Relationships

 

You would be surprised to know how much sleep can affect your day-to-day life, your feelings, and your emotional wellness. Make sure you get enough.

Sleep and Emotional Wellness

 

Confidence, knowing yourself and your mental health, and talking to others, including professionals, can help you build emotional wellness.

Support for Your Mental Health

 

Handling stress in a healthy way is a key part of your emotional wellness. We can help.

Beating Stress

 

Wondering how you rank in emotional wellness? Here are 7 signs you’re emotionally healthy.

Becoming Emotionally Healthy

Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week

Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week

Last week was Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week. Olympians Michael Phelps and Allison Schmitt helped raise awareness about children’s mental health.

Happy, Healthy Children

 

Your children may seem healthy, but you never know what’s happening in their heads.

 

Community members can help young adults by knowing the signs.

 

You can help a young adult with mental health issues by being a source of support.

 

Communicating with your doctor and family about your mental health is an important lesson to teach your kids. Teach them to share their feelings.

Children and young adults with mental health problems need real care and support.

 

Social health, which could include friendships and bullying, is an important part of your kids’ mental health. Learn more and talk to them.

Their Emotional and Social Support System

World AIDS Day and Raising AIDS Awareness

AIDS Awareness

World AIDS day was December 1, so we’re helping raise HIV and AIDS awareness this week.

Make sure you understand the basic facts.

HIV 101

 

From 2005 to 2014, the annual number of new AIDS/HIV diagnoses declined by 19%.

Who's At Risk?

 

1 in 8 of those infected with HIV don’t know they’re infected. Get tested.

We're Getting Tested!

 

51% of young people living with HIV don’t know they’re infected, so getting tested is key.

We're Doing It

 

Treatment helps save lives. Work with your doctor if you’re diagnosed.

HIV Treatment Works

 

An estimated 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV.Let’s Stop HIV Together

 

Talking about AIDS and raising awareness can save lives.

Stop HIV One Conversation At a Time

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You're Not Alone

Vantage Point: Choosing Hope

The surrounding orchards could not have been more green and vibrant as they readied to grow fruit. The river ran brilliant blue, reflecting a sky filled with puffy, white clouds. The sun shone brightly, arousing hope as only a perfect NCW spring day can. But it took a tragic turn for the worse as I received the call. A dear family member, known for his gentle heart, had tragically committed suicide.      

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death that could be prevented in the United States across groups, including seniors. Locally, rates have steadily risen in Chelan and Douglas counties since 2012, and Okanogan County has one of the highest rates in the state.

Washington state has recently declared that suicide prevention is a statewide public safety issue and is requiring MDs, DOs, APCs, nurses, and rehab staff to complete 6 hours of suicide prevention training as part of their licensure. This will help them gain the tools and knowledge to recognize at-risk patients, communicate with them, and take the appropriate steps for follow-through.

Reaching out to Carolina Venn-Padilla, MSW, LASW, of the Catholic Family and Child Service’s Suicide Prevention Coalition of North Central Washington, I shared my lack of knowledge and understanding.

Carolina was truly sorry to hear of my loss. She said it’s important to promote hope, connection, social support, treatment, and recovery to help with suicide prevention.

The public seems to think that suicide is a response to stressful situations and that suicidal thoughts may lead to death. It is important to combat this view with positive messaging that shows actions people can take to prevent suicide and stories that show prevention works, that recovery is possible, and that programs, services, and help exist.

This does not mean we should minimize the very real stories of struggle. For my family, that beautiful spring day changed our lives and saddened us to depths we may never recover from. I’m not close to having the answers to what we could have done differently, but I have chosen not to dwell on the negative. Instead, I will honor our loved one by calling attention to suicide and encouraging other families struggling to choose hope.

Help is never far away:

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off she enjoys spending time with her family and riding horses.        

Give Back Christmas Wishes

Give Back for the Holidays

This week, we’re helping you find ways to give back this holiday season.

Donate a homemade scarf to the Orphan Foundation of America’s Red Scarf Project and give foster teens in college a way to stay warm.

Donate a Red Scarf

 

Toys for Tots collects new, unwrapped, or your homemade toys to give to kids in need. Find a drop-off center.

Donate new, gently used, or homemade coats to those who need them with the Warm Coats & Warm Hearts Coat Drive.

Giving Warmth

 

Send a thoughtful holiday card to American service members, veterans, and their families with the American Red Cross’s Holiday Mail for Heroes program.

Reaching Out for the Holidays

 

Fill a shoe box with handmade or bought gifts to send a personalized present to a child in need through Samaritan’s Purse’s Operation Christmas Child program.

Give a Personalized Gift

 

Donate your old cell phone to Cell Phones for Soldiers and give the gift of communication to our troops and their families.

Give Your Old Phone

 

Give the gift of a good holiday meal to a family that might otherwise go without through a food bank near you.

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