Tag Archives: childhood

Healthy PB&J Recipes

Healthy PB&J Recipes

April 2 was National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day, and in honor of everyone who never quite grew up from the beloved classic, here are fun interpretations of healthy PB&J recipes.

First up are some healthy ways to elevate PB&J for your grown-up tastes.

PB&Js for Grown-Ups
Image and Recipe via Shape

 

Transform breakfast for your family with this PB&J Oats Power Bowl.

Whip up these PB&J Superfood Energy Balls for a quick snack on the go.

PB&J Superfood Energy Bars
Image and Recipe via The Healthy Maven

 

These No Added Sugar PB&J Baked Oatmeal Bars are perfect for breakfast or a snack for the kids.

No Added Sugar PB&J Baked Oatmeal Bars
Image and Recipe via Lively Table

 

Peanut Butter and Jelly Chia Pudding is an easy and delicious way to transform PB&J into a healthy breakfast.

Whip up this simple Peanut Butter & Jelly Smoothie to drink your childhood favorite.

Peanut Butter & Jelly Smoothie
Image and Recipe via Greatist

 

Make this easy Vegan Strawberry PB&J Granola for a healthy snack or breakfast.

What Grandparents Should Know About Vaccines

Covered Bridge: 3 Things Grandparents Should Know About Vaccines

There are few things more exciting in this world than the arrival of a grandchild. The anticipation of seeing if the baby has your child’s eyes, the enjoyment of picking out all of those adorable baby clothes, and those precious weekends at grandma’s!

While flu season is slowly falling behind us, new grandparents should also remember the importance of protecting their grandchild from preventable illnesses by understanding all vaccines. Vaccines are not just important for the newborn, but also for you.

  1. Vaccines Are Safe and Effective

    The medical community is in agreement that vaccines are safe and effective and that they do not cause serious harm to children. Vaccines are the single most important method to prevent diseases like polio, whooping cough, and the measles. Vaccines go through rigorous testing, and children are far more likely to be harmed by the illnesses than by the vaccines themselves. The World Health Organization has a useful website debunking myths about vaccines.

  2. Whooping Cough

    Do you think whooping cough is an extinct illness from your childhood? Sadly, because people haven’t been vaccinating their kids, illnesses that were once very rare thanks to high vaccination rates are now reappearing.

    Whooping cough (also called pertussis) is one illness that is especially dangerous to newborns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that in 2017, there were 17,972 reported cases of whooping cough. While that number is down from 2014, it certainly shows there is still an issue.

  3. Time for a Booster?

    You may be thinking, “Wait! I was already vaccinated against whooping cough when I was a child.” But the CDC recommends you get a Tdap shot, the vaccine that protects against whooping cough, every 10 years or if you’re 65 or older and in close contact with infants. Don’t forget about your annual flu shot either.

Take steps to protect the health of you and your grandbaby. Making precious memories with your new grandchild will be more enjoyable with that peace of mind.

 

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Hunt for Happiness Week

Hunt for Happiness Week

It’s Hunt for Happiness Week, and it’s the perfect time of year to find what makes you happy and figure out how to prioritize it in the new year.

If you’re not eating healthy meals or getting enough sleep, you may not be ready to focus on what makes you happy. Start with the basics that give you the foundation you’ll need for happiness.

Start with the Basics for Happiness

 

Think about what you want to focus on and what makes you happy in 2019 by making a vision board on your Pinterest.

Making Your Happiness Vision Board

 

Don’t treat the blues with something you’ll feel guilty about later. Skip the fast food burger and instead go for a hike, sing along to your favorite album, or cuddle your pet.

Create a happy space in your home. Use colors and artwork you love, your favorite candle and music, a cozy throw or sweater, and a favorite activity. Spend time in it daily.

Happy Space in Your Home

 

What made you happiest as a child? Pick up a puzzle, adult coloring book, or your baseball glove and relive your happiest childhood activities.

Relive Childhood Happiness

 

Appreciate the everyday moments of happiness in your life, whether that’s your morning coffee, time playing with your kids, or watching TV with your loved ones at night.

Appreciate the Small Happy Moments

 

Research shows that giving can make you happier and more grateful. Find a cause you believe in and volunteer or join a charity 5k with friends.

Giving Is Good for Happiness
Trends Coming Full Circle

Vantage Point: Coming Full Circle

I don’t know why, but lately, everywhere I look, I see so many things becoming popular that are from “back in the day.” Yes, we all know as each day goes by, we’re getting just a bit older. We don’t feel it, but as I look back 3 or 6 months at a time, I notice subtle changes.

When I was growing up, my parents still owned a telephone that had a long swirly cord attached, and you had to sit in the kitchen to be on the phone. As time went on, I remember going to friends’ houses after school, and they had wireless home phones that they could take into their rooms.

I would go home and beg my parents to please get a wireless home phone. It took a lot of begging, but we finally got one. Now, I see that fewer and fewer people have home phones at all, and I personally miss them.

Then came the camera. As a child, my mom would purchase film for her camera, we’d take pictures, and once the film was full, we’d take it to the store and fill out an envelope with our information to pick up our pictures in a couple of days.

Then, digital cameras with an SM card came around. You could retake pictures as many times as you wanted and then choose which ones you wanted to print.

Now, most of us don’t even own cameras since we have cameras on our phones. Most people don’t even print pictures nowadays, they just save them to hard drives, social media, and the cloud. I’ve personally lost so many pictures when my phone has suddenly stopped working.

My younger sister recently had a birthday, and I asked for a list of things she might want. At the top of her list was an Instax mini camera. I had no idea what that was, so I looked it up online.

Of course, it’s the new version of Polaroid camera. Apparently, they’re the cool thing to have with all the young teens. I found it humorous that everything had come full circle. First, we had physical versions of our pictures, then we loved the digital versions, and now we want the physical versions again.

Everything really does come full circle, fashion, music, and even electronics. I myself am really considering getting a Polaroid camera so I can be part of the cool kids again.

 

Jessica Arroyo, born and raised in the Wenatchee Valley, is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off, she enjoys spending time with her husband and infant son.

Hot Cocoa and Winter Health Risks

Long View: Cold Hands, Hot Cocoa

I always remember December from my childhood, when the weather got subzero, and the wind was playfully whipping snowflakes around. School was out for the holidays, and my sister and I always loved to play outdoors, despite the frigid temperatures.

We would come downstairs with our garb, and Mom would get us all bundled up to brave the weather. Snowsuits, scarves, hats, gloves, and boots were standard outerwear those days. My mom would secure the scarf so that it would stay put, and the hat would cover my ears and my forehead. When she was through, I could barely see and hardly move.

I remember stiffly walking out the door, hoping that with more movement, I would loosen up enough to enjoy some of the winter wonderland we called our yard. Hot cocoa would be waiting for us when we came in, and it was like magic what that cup of warmth could do!

Today, I run out of the house without a coat, hat, gloves, or scarf, thinking, I’m just going to the car, then running in to work. My days of bundling up are over. This is what happens when you go from 6 years old to 60. But honestly, what am I thinking?

Winter health risks should be a concern for our aging population. (Hey, that’s me too!) The most obvious risk is the weather itself. Midwestern winters can consist of ice and snow. Driving is a challenge. Walking is even more of a challenge. Slips on ice are a major risk, so it’s important to wear the right shoes or boots with good traction if you have to go out.  

Hypothermia is also a common winter weather health risk. Hypothermia means your body temperature has fallen below 95 degrees, and once it gets to that point for a prolonged period of time, you can’t produce enough energy to stay warm.

Symptoms include shivering, cold pale skin, lack of coordination, slowed reactions and breathing, and mental confusion. It’s good to pay attention to how cold it is where you are, whether it’s indoors or outdoors. Also, make sure you’re eating enough to keep up a healthy weight. Body fat helps you stay warm.

Frostbite is another health risk during the winter months. Frostbite means your skin has been over-exposed to cold temperatures, and it usually affects the nose, ears, cheeks, fingers, and toes. It can be severe and cause permanent damage to the skin, and even progress to the bone.

Frostbite can affect anyone who is exposed to below freezing temperatures, in particular, those who aren’t wearing the right clothing. It’s important to wear layers, preferably 2 to 3 layers of loose-fitting clothing, as well as a coat, hat, gloves, and a scarf. Covering up your nose and mouth will also protect your lungs from the cold air.

As for drinking a cup of hot cocoa, well, that is a winter weather health benefit! According to a study at Cornell University, hot cocoa has almost twice as many antioxidants as red wine, and 2 to 3 times more than green tea! This winter, enjoy the magic of the season by keeping yourself safe and warm.

 

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.

Healthy Frozen Pop Recipes

Healthy Frozen Pop Recipes

Summer’s winding down, but it’s never too late to stock your freezer with some refreshing and tasty treats with this week’s healthy frozen pop recipes.

First up is a colorful treat, Tropical Coconut Chia Pops.

Skip the iced latte with these Roasted Blueberries ‘n’ Cream Matcha Pops.

Rehydrating Electrolyte Pops are the perfect treat after a day at the pool or working outside.

Rehydrating Electrolyte Pops
Image and Recipe via Raising Generation Nourished

 

Relive your childhood or excite your kids with these Healthy Fudge Pops.

Healthy Fudgesicles
Image and Recipe via Gluten Free on a Shoestring

 

Dress up your ice pop for adults with these easy Herb-Infused Fruit Pops.

Have Coconut Lime Pops to feel like you spent the day at the beach.

Coconut Lime Popsicles
Image and Recipe via The Charming Detroiter

 

Ditch the ice cream pint with these Mint Chocolate Chip Greek Yogurt Pops.

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School Lunches Done Right

Vantage Point: Eating Like a Grown-Up

With the holidays fast-approaching, I think fondly of my mother. She was a private and commercial cook for over 40 years and was very good about making our family eat balanced meals. Of course, she included my school lunches in that quest as well.

Like every kid, I wanted a lunch just like my friends’. Their menus consisted of:

  • Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches
  • Bags of chips
  • Carrots (only a few)
  • A Twinkie or Hostess cupcake

My mother had other ideas. Here’s an example of what my lunches consisted of:

  • Meatloaf sandwich
  • Cut-up celery
  • An apple or pear
  • A box of raisins

To a sixth-grader, this was so not cool. I pleaded and begged with my mom to change what she was putting in my lunches, to no avail. By high school, I was buying lunch, and she never knew what I ate.

Fast forward to my lunches as an adult. Most days, I eat leftovers from dinner the night before, which works out great because they are well-balanced meals. However, on those days when I am on-the-go out of the office, it’s a little bit more work to eat a balanced meal. I sometimes feel like I am channeling my mother, or she’s haunting me.

I think all of our tastes develop and get more complex as we get older. And with that, healthier eating gets easier, especially if we make the choice. I find myself making that choice by looking for places to eat where the food is served fresh, well-balanced, and healthy.

And every once in a while, I still find myself wanting a Twinkie or a Hostess cupcake, well…just because I can.

 

Joy Stanford is a community liaison with Health Alliance, serving Thurston County. She’s been involved with Medicare for 20+ years and truly enjoys it. She enjoys gospel, R&B, and country music, and she owns over 100 pairs of shoes.