Tag Archives: cheese

National Cheese Month

National Cheese Month

It’s National Cheese Month, and you can make the most of everybody’s favorite with these healthy cheesy recipes.

Step up your grilled cheese with this veggie-filled Mediterranean Grilled Cheese Sandwich.

Mediterranean Grilled Cheese Sandwich

 

Load up your pasta night with healthy veggies with this Fettuccine with Kale, Caramelized Onion, and Goat Cheese.

Fettuccine With Kale, Caramelized Onions and Goat Cheese

 

Lighten up pizza night or impress guests with this Pear Naan Pizza with Honey Whipped Cheese.

Pear Naan Pizza with Honey Whipped Goat Cheese

 

These lightened-up Spinach Goat Cheese Turkey Burgers have a kick you’ll love.

Spinach Goat Cheese Turkey Burgers
Image and Recipe via Eat Live Run

 

Lighten up your kids’ favorite with this rich White Cheddar Avocado Mac and Cheese.

White Cheddar Avocado Mac & Cheese
Image and Recipe via Life As a Strawberry

 

Have your friends over for a night-in with this beautiful Goat Cheese and Basil Dip with Honey.

Goat Cheese and Basil Dip with Honey
Image and Recipe via The Butter Half

 

This Whole Wheat Spinach Goat Cheese Pizza is an adult spin on pizza and packs a flavorful punch.

Whole Wheat Spinach Goat Cheese Pizza
Image and Recipe via Eat Good 4 Life

Protect Your Children's Dental Health

Foods for Children’s Dental Health

It’s National Children’s Dental Health Month, so we have some recipes to try to work into your kids’ diets that are good for their teeth.

Cheese has been found to raise the PH in your mouth, which lowers risk of tooth decay.

For your adventurous eaters, try this healthy Cheesy Turkey Stuffed Peppers.

Cheesy Turkey Stuffed Peppers
Image and Recipe via Cookie Named Desire

 

Yogurt’s probiotics are good for your gums. Try these 7 Healthy Fro-Yo Recipes.

7 Healthy Fro-Yo Recipes
Image and Recipes via Greatist

 

Leafy greens are high in calcium and vitamins for your teeth. Sneak them in with 20 Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes.

20 Healthy Green Smoothie RecipesImage and Recipe via Yummy Healthy Easy

 

Apples help you produce saliva that rinses out your mouth and is good for your gums.

Try Apple Pie in a Jar for a fun new way to get your kids to eat their apple a day.

Apple Pie in a Jar
Image and Recipe via Vie de la Vegan

 

Carrots can help lower your risk of cavities and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A.

If your kids love pasta, this Raw Carrot Pasta with Peanut Sauce is a great way to get their veggies.

Raw Carrot Pasta with Peanut Sauce
Image and Recipe via Betsy Life

 

Celery has great vitamins that are good for gums, and it acts like a toothbrush scraping out food and bacteria.

The apples in this Celery Root and Apple Salad can help convince your kids to get their veggies in.

Celery Root and Apple SaladImage and Recipe via Gourmande in the Kitchen

 

Almonds are a great source of calcium and protein while being low in sugar.

These Sea Salt Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters taste like candy and are good for your teeth.

Sea Salt Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters
Image and Recipe via Sally’s Baking Addiction

Grocery Shopping Fresh

Grocery Shopping Like a Pro

Even after you’ve gotten ready to head to the store, grocery shopping on a budget for healthy meals can be hard. But there are some things you can do to make it easier.

Stock Your Pantry

Keeping your kitchen stocked with certain key things can make cooking easy. This list has some items that are perfect for this. And this article has some healthy foods perfect for your pantry that only cost about $2.

Add one item that won’t go bad, like a spice, grain, beans, or frozen veggies to your cart each shopping trip to help you build your pantry without dropping a lot of money at once. (These are also good things to buy in bulk when they’re on sale if you have space to store them.)

Having this stocked pantry will help you throw together meals fast, help you save on packaged or premade meals you might’ve grabbed in a hurry, and make shopping easier.

Choosing Your Store

Choosing where you shop can also help you save. Besides the grocery store, some great places to find good deals are:

  • Ethnic markets
  • Dollar stores
  • Retail supercenters
  • Wholesale clubs
  • Farmers markets

At the Store

Once you’re at the store, you should try to shop the outer edge of it as much as possible. The outer edge usually has the fresh produce, like fruits and veggies, meat, dairy, bread, and frozen food. It’s typically the inner aisles that are full of boxed and processed foods.

Fruits & Veggies

It’s recommended that you eat 5 servings of veggies a day, so it’s important to really use that part of the store. With that in mind, fruits and veggies, fresh or frozen, should take up about a third of your cart on each shopping trip.

  • Shop in season 

At the farmers market, you have to buy what’s in season, but at the grocery store, there are lots of choices. But when you buy what’s in season, you can save a lot, and your food will be the tastiest and freshest it can be. This list can help you find what’s in season when.

  • Buy bags at the right time

With certain go-to things your family will always use, like apples, oranges, potatoes, and onions, buying them in the big bags when they’re in season can help you save even more.

  • Stock up on canned and frozen fruits and veggies

Canned and frozen fruits and veggies are picked while they’re in season and tasting best, and they’re good for you, too. So instead of buying fresh peas when they’re not in season, stock up on frozen ones to save and get the best flavor. Plus, they last much longer.

Look for frozen veggies without added sauces or butter. Choose canned fruit in 100% fruit juice and veggies with “low-sodium” or “no salt added.”

Canned veggies and broths are perfect for easy soups and stews, and canned fruit makes great fruit salad and snacks for the kids.

Packaged Goods

Avoid a lot of the packaged and processed foods in the center of the store. Cookies, candy, chips, crackers, and soda are all high in things you don’t want, like sugar, salt, and bad fats, and low in things like protein and nutrients. They’re also expensive.

  • Look for whole grains

Be careful you don’t get fooled by things that just call out wheat. Instead, look for whole grains and whole-grain breads.

  • Find high-protein foods besides meat

Yogurt and cheeses are great sources of protein, as are beans and other legumes, which you can find dried or canned.

  • Be smart about cereal

Cereals are one of the top foods for hidden sugar. Look for ones with little or no sugar. You can always add honey to flavor it in the bowl. Also look for cereals high in fiber to start your day right.

  • Try new things in the bulk aisle

If you want to try a new grain, nut, or dried fruit, the bulk aisle with bins is a great way to taste test. Scoop out a small bag for your family to taste before buying bigger servings.

Shopping Tips

Make the most of your trip by paying attention to how your store organizes things, their price tags, and food labels.

  • Don’t shop at eye level

Stores oftentimes stock the most expensive things right where they’ll catch your eye. Looking at the upper and lower shelves can help you find the best deal.

  • Grab from the back

Stores also stock from the back, putting newer things behind the older ones. Grabbing from the back gets you fresher food with better expiration dates, so your food will be good for longer.

  • Look for store brands

Many stores have their own brands of items, and in most cases, you’ll get the exact same or very similar thing at a much better price.

  • Read the label

Reading the nutrition label can tell you a lot about what’s in a food, if it’s good for you, and help you choose between brands.

  • Pay attention to serving sizes

Some things might seem good for you until you check the serving size. Sometimes the serving size is much smaller than what you’d actually eat in a sitting, which makes the numbers on the label look better.

  • Learn how to read unit price on the price tag

Unit price tells you how much something costs per pound, ounce, quart, or other unit of measure. It can tell you which brands are the most affordable. This guide can help you read or calculate unit price.

  • Have a calculator handy

Whether it’s on your phone or you bring a small calculator along to the store, having one on hand can make it easy to compare labels and costs.

Up Next:

Learn how to read and make sense of nutrition labels to get the most out of your food.

Serving Up Healthy Pizza

Healthy Pizza

This week in comfort food, we wrapped up March with the ultimate in takeout, homemade and healthy pizza.

First up was a Four-Cheese Pizza that is rich and yet, only 370 calories.

Four-Cheese Pizza

 

Bacon, Tomato, and Arugula Pizza lets you indulge with everyone’s favorite meat and get your vegetables.

Bacon, Tomato, and Arugula Pizza

 

Make these Individual White Chicken Pizzas, and freeze the rest for your next weekend craving.

Individual White Chicken Pizzas

 

This Kale, Pepper, and Red Onions Pizza uses whole wheat pizza dough so it’s healthy from start to finish.

Kale, Peppers, Red Onions Pizza

 

Instead of having a salad on the side, pile the greens on top with this Prosciutto-Arugula Pizza.

Prosciutto-Arugula Pizza

 

These Quick BBQ Chicken Pizzas use rotisserie chicken, so that this meal is easy anytime.

Quick BBQ Chicken Pizzas

 

Fresh Tomato-Feta Pizza is light, tasty, and has your favorite pizza toppings, like olives.

Fresh Tomato-Feta Pizza

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Calcium and Your Bones

Build Stronger Bones with Calcium and Vitamin D

You might think only people with osteoporosis or weak bones need to worry about getting enough calcium and Vitamin D. If you don’t have osteoporosis, or bone loss, and you eat a well-balanced diet, you’re probably getting the recommended daily amount of both.

But let’s be honest, a lot of us have a diet that is anything but well-balanced. (And no, alternating between frozen pizza and frozen fish sticks does not count as balanced.)

The good news is you don’t have to overhaul your entire diet to keep your bones in great shape. Making a few small changes can help you reach the recommended daily amounts.

Got Milk?

vitamin blog1

Milk is one of the easiest ways to make sure you’re getting enough calcium and Vitamin D.

An 8 oz. glass of fat-free or low-fat milk has around 30% of the daily recommended amount of calcium and 25% of the recommended Vitamin D. The same goes for calcium-fortified soy milk. Other dairy products like cheese and yogurt, are also rich in both.

The Non-Milky Way

If you are lactose intolerant or just don’t eat dairy, you can still get enough calcium and Vitamin D from your diet.

Try these non-dairy foods for calcium:

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Soybeans
  • White beans
  • Okra
  • Collards
  • Some fish, like sardines, salmon, perch, and rainbow trout
  • Calcium-fortified foods, like soy milk, oatmeal, cereal, and some orange juice

And these non-dairy foods for Vitamin D:

  • Fatty fish, like tuna, mackerel, and salmon
  • Egg yolks
  • Vitamin D-fortified foods, like orange juice, soy milk, and cereal

If you don’t think you’re getting enough of both from your diet, a supplement could help fill in the gaps.

But more is not always better, and getting too much of either can be harmful to your health. Talk to your doctor to make sure you get the right amount.

For recipes packed with calcium and Vitamin D, check out our Pinterest.