Tag Archives: breast cancer

World Cancer Day,

Covered Bridge: One Day, Awareness for All

It’s likely that we’ve all known or come across at least one individual who has touched our lives with their empowering story. What do I mean by empowering story, you ask?

I mean the story of a family member, friend, fellow co-worker, or acquaintance that leaves a chill in your bones when you listen to how hard they fought. The kind of story that leaves a lasting impression on how you view life. One that alters who you are, even just a little. And one that proves, when faced with hardship, struggles, and even death, these individuals gave it all they have. Their fight can come from something greater than any of us can imagine, a love of life so great that fighting to beat it is the only choice they have.

You see, February 4 was World Cancer Day, which is meant to raise awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment. World Cancer Day was founded by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) to support the goals of the World Cancer Declaration. We regularly hear about different months dedicated to raising awareness about certain types of cancer, but World Cancer Day is awareness for all cancers.

Here at Reid Health Alliance Medicare, we highly encourage you to get preventive care, keep yourself healthy and educated about cancer, and have the tools to keep the ones you love in the know.

Here are a few tips to protect yourself from cancer from WorldCancerDay.org:

  • Quit smoking. Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of cancer. Quitting at any age can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life.
  • Maintain a healthy weight and make physical activity part of your everyday life. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of bowel, breast, uterine, ovarian, pancreatic, esophagus, kidney, liver, advanced prostate, and gallbladder cancers. Specific changes to your diet, like limiting red or processed meat, can also make a difference.
  • Reduce your alcohol consumption. Limiting alcohol can help decrease the risk of mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, bowel, liver and breast cancer.
  • Protect your skin. Reducing exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun and other sources, like tanning beds, can help reduce the risk of many skin cancers.

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Coming Together for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Protect yourself now. How can you reduce your risk of breast cancer? Learn more.

Find out what you should be doing to detect breast cancer early.

Staying Ahead of Breast Cancer

 

Create your early detection plan and make sure you’re protected from breast cancer.

Preventing Cancer Now

 

Nervous about your mammogram? What you should know:

7 Things to Know About Getting a Mammogram

 

Use Beyond the Shock, a comprehensive guide to breast cancer, if you or a loved one is diagnosed.

Moving Forward After Breast Cancer

 

Stories of hope offer support to those who have or care for someone with breast cancer.

Hope for Moving On

 

How can you support the breast cancer cause? Get started today.

Get Involved to Stop Breast Cancer

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Going to Your Well-Woman Visit

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

Your insurance covers an annual well-woman visit. But what exactly does that mean?

Your yearly well-woman visit can be either a combination of your annual physical and care specific to you as a woman or a separate appointment for just that care.

Preventive Care at Your Well-Woman Visit

Your plan covers a lot of preventive care and screenings, many of which you’ll get at your yearly physical. But for some of the care, you’ll probably want to schedule a separate well-woman visit with a specialist, like a gynecologist, or even multiple appointments with your doctor and different specialists.

Depending on timing and what your doctor recommends, this care includes:

Screenings & Care
  • Osteoporosis screening – For women over age 60, depending on risk factors. Beginning at age 65, you should get this bone density test annually.
  • Domestic and interpersonal violence screening and counseling
Cancer Screenings & Counseling
  • Breast cancer genetic test counseling (BRCA) – For women at higher risk.
  • Breast cancer mammography screenings – Every 1 to 2 years for women starting at age 50 until at least 74. Most clinics require a referral from your primary care provider (PCP) or gynecologist for mammograms.
  • Breast cancer chemoprevention counseling – For women at higher risk.
  • Cervical cancer screening – If you’re between the ages of 21 and 65, your doctor should review your history to choose a Pap smear schedule for you.
Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Screenings
  • Sexually transmitted infections counseling – For sexually active women.
  • Chlamydia infection screening – Women age 25 or younger and sexually active should get tested annually. If you’re older, talk to your doctor about being tested.
  • Gonorrhea screening – For all women at higher risk.
  • HIV screening and counseling – For sexually active women.
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test – Every 3 years for women with normal cytology results who are 30 or older.
  • Syphilis screening – For women at increased risk.

And if you’re pregnant or may become pregnant, there’s even more preventive care covered for you.

Prepare for Your Visit

Preparing with questions, and answers to your doctor’s questions, can help you make the most of your visit.

Know Your Family History

Talk to your family members, especially your mom, about your family’s history of women’s health issues. For example, as a woman, you’re more likely to get breast cancer if it’s genetic on your mom’s side of the family. So knowing this information can help your doctor keep an eye out for genetic issues you’re at risk for.

Talk to Your Doctor

Prepare for your appointment by knowing any questions or issues you want to talk to your doctor about. Some things you might want to ask include:

  • What immunizations or shots you need, like the HPV vaccine
  • If you should get STI screenings
  • Help getting pregnant or birth control options
  • How to do self-exams to regularly check for breast cancer
  • Mental and social health concerns, like relationship issues or domestic violence questions
  • Specific issues you might be having, like problems with your menstruation or abnormal pain or cramping

Know What’s Covered

Log in to Your Health Alliance or search by your member number to see what preventive care your plan covers.

Or use our general preventive care guidelines and prescription drugs or our Medicare preventive care guidelines to get an idea of what our plans cover.

If you’re not sure what’s covered and what you’ll need a preauthorization for, you can also check your coverage and preauthorization lists at Your Health Alliance.

Now that you’re ready to go to your well-woman visit, log in to Your Health Alliance to find a covered doctor, or start searching for doctors in our network.

National High Blood Pressure Education Month

National High Blood Pressure Education Month

It’s National High Blood Pressure Education Month. High blood pressure increases your stroke risk, and every 40 seconds, an American has a stroke. Learn more.

High Blood Pressure's Risk

 

The Dangers of Strokes for Women

Do you understand your blood pressure? Learn more now.

Understanding Blood Pressure

 

High Blood Pressure's Risk

Break down your risk of high blood pressure to understand it better.

Breaking Down Why Your Blood Pressure’s High

 

Your Age and Strokes

Learn to eat right and exercise to fight high blood pressure.

Learn to Eat Right and Exercise for Your Heart

 

 High Blood Pressure's Risk

Tobacco takes a toll on your blood pressure. Learn more and get help quitting.

Tobacco and Your Heart

 

Learn About High Blood Pressure

This handy guide helps break down the info around your blood pressure meds.

Your Meds and Your Heart

 

High Blood Pressure's Risk

We’ve got quick tips to help you cut back on salt for your blood pressure without losing flavor:

Cutting Back on Salt for Your Heart

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Busting Your Stress for Stress Awareness Month

Stress Awareness Month

It’s Stress Awareness Month, and 30% of Americans feel it affects their physical health. Relaxing is good for your heart and mind and can reduce the chance of stroke, colds, obesity, depression, and breast cancer.

Try aromatherapy with citrus scents, which can reduce stress.

Aromatheraphy and Your Stress Levels

 

Reading for just 6 minutes could reduce your stress by 68%, which is more than some other popular de-stressing methods.

Reading to Relax

 

Looking for a snack to take the stressful edge off your afternoon? Try these.

Smart Snacking Instead of Stress

 

Science has found that your dog can reduce your stress, especially if you take it to work.

The Ultimate Stress-Fighter

 

Try the Chocolate Meditation for an easy and tasty intro to the stress-busting activity.

Conscious Chocolate Consumption

 

Whether you’re trying to meditate, get better sleep, or be inspired, these apps can help you reduce stress.

Apps to Beat Anxiety

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October Awareness Months

October Awareness Months

There are a lot of important awareness months in October, so we will be connecting you to info and resources for a different one each day.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Learn more about this cancer, and how you can help.

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It’s also Down Syndrome Awareness Month. Learn more about it and how you can help.

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It’s also National Physical Therapy Month. There are ways physical therapy can help you age well. Learn more.

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It’s also SIDS Awareness Month. Make sure you know how to protect your baby and help make a difference.

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It’s also Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Help protect your loved ones and get involved with the cause.

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It’s also Spina Bfida Awareness Month. Learn more about it and help enhance the lives of those affected.

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It’s also Eye Safety and Injury Prevention Months. Learn more about how and when you should be protecting your eyes.

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Breastfeeding Your Newborn

World Breastfeeding Week

It’s World Breastfeeding Week and National Breastfeeding Month. Do you know the benefits?

The health benefits apply to mothers and their babies in both developed and developing countries.

Two month old baby sleeping

 

Breast milk is perfectly suited for a baby’s nutritional needs, and the process helps mothers and babies bond.

It’s also unmatched in its immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory properties that protect mothers and babies from many illnesses.

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Formula feeding increases the risk of common childhood infections and some rare but serious infections and diseases, like leukemia.

Shot of an attractive young woman bonding with her baby girl while doing yoga

 

The risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is 56% higher for babies who were never breastfed.

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Mothers who never breastfed are also at a higher risk for certain health issues, like breast and ovarian cancer.

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The U.S. is one of only 3 countries in the world without a guaranteed maternity leave, which can be important for breastfeeding moms.

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