Tag Archives: Braille

National Braille Literacy Month

National Braille Literacy Month

It’s National Braille Literacy Month, and despite growing technology, braille is still important. 70% of blind adults are unemployed, but of those who are employed, 90% can read braille.

Despite Tech, Braille Matters

 

There are over 60,000 blind children in the U.S., but only 10% of blind students are learning to read with braille.

Literacy for blind students depends upon braille, and it’s proven to help them gain independence and employment as adults.

Independence Through Braille

 

60% of blind students drop out of school, and not being able to read plays a huge part. Imagine not being able to reread a sentence as you’re learning new words or not being able to understand literature.

The Importance of Reading for Finishing School

 

Partially sighted children are the ones most likely to be left behind in both print and braille reading.

Partially Sighted Students Getting Left Behind

 

85% of blind students go to public schools, but many states don’t require them to teach braille, despite how it helps prepare students for the future.

Preparing Blind Students for the Future

 

Students who learn braille are more likely to finish high school, go to college, have better self-esteem, and get jobs as adults.

A Brighter Future with Braille

Blind Prespective

Vantage Point: Local Organization Puts Struggles of Blind in Plain Sight

During my outreach travels for Health Alliance Medicare, I’ve been blown away by the beauty of the sun rising over the cornfields of the Columbia Basin and eagles nesting along the Wenatchee River. Recently meeting Jodi Duncan of Samara’s Foundation for the Blind and Visually Impaired, however, inspires me to never take my sight for granted.

Jodi founded Samara’s, named after her daughter who developed juvenile diabetes at age 9 and began losing her vision in her early 20s. Before passing from the disease in 1995, Samara asked her mom, “How come they can’t help people like me?”

In Jodi’s grief, she took that question to heart.

The foundation’s mission is to give people with sight impairments the opportunity to improve their quality of life and further learning through advocacy and technological support. Samara’s work includes providing audio crosswalks, Braille printers, magnifying equipment, teacher training programs, and camp opportunities for all ages. Samara’s outreach within Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties relies on funding from events that Jodi’s small army of volunteers organize and facilitate.

One of the biggest myths about Samara’s foundation is that a person in need has to rent the equipment. All equipment is loaned free of charge, and 100 percent of the money Samara’s raises stays local. Some fundraisers include a quilt raffle or a “Dinner in the Dark,” where participants eat blindfolded.

For information or for ways to support Samara’s, please call 509-470-8080 or visit Samaras.org.

Through my work at Health Alliance Medicare, I regularly get the opportunity to help connect people to valuable community resources. But in meeting Jodi, I could not help but be especially touched as tears still well in her eyes while talking about her daughter. This showed me the foundation named in Samara’s honor is more than just a non-profit—it is the work of a mother’s eternal love.