Tag Archives: born

Preventing Group B Strep

Group B Strep Awareness Month

July is Group B Strep (GBS) Awareness Month, so we’re helping you learn more about it each day.

GBS is a type of bacteria that’s in the digestive track of up to 1 in 4 pregnant women, and can cause babies to be miscarried, stillborn, premature, handicapped, or very sick. Learn more.

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GBS Disease has 3 types, prenatal (during pregnancy), early-onset which happens within your baby’s first week, and late-onset, anytime after 1 week. Learn more.

Cropped shot of a father holding his infant child in the air

 

GBS does have noticeable symptoms! If you’re pregnant, call your doctor if you have less or no fetal movement after your 20th week, or if you have an unexplained fever.

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Once your baby’s born, call you doctor or take them to the ER if they have refuse to eat, sleep too much, have a high or low temp, red skin, or blue or pale skin from not enough oxygen. See the full list of symptoms.

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Babies can be infected with GBS from in the womb until several months old. Women usually don’t have symptoms, but should get infections during pregnancy treated right away.

I could lay here forever

 

You can check for GBS with a urine test during pregnancy if you’re worried you might have it.

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The hospital can also test your baby to see if they have GBS after they’re born, so talk to your doctor about any symptoms you see.

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Family Memories

Long View: Find Your Family Legacy

My mom and Aunt Winona were riding in my car, discussing the latest family birth, when I asked them each what hospital they were born in. They both laughed and said they were born at home.

When I asked them who helped my grandmother with the birth, they told me their Grandma (Lucy) Smith was there. “Grandma Smith was a very well-known midwife in the area and even helped deliver Omar Bradley.”

I said “What? Wait. Do you mean Omar Bradley, the famous Five-Star General?”

My mom said, “Yes, and she was very proud of it.”

This prompted me to do an Internet search and gather some family history to learn more. Lucy Belle Carter, my great-grandmother, was born in 1860 in Moberly, MO. She married John O. Smith in 1878 and moved to Renick, MO, where she gave birth to six children; the last surviving child, my grandmother, was born in 1898.

Omar Bradley was born near Clark, MO, in 1893, the son of John Smith Bradley and Mary Elizabeth Hubbard. The distance from Renick to Clark is 7 miles. My great-grandmother Lucy was 33 years old at the time of Omar’s birth and had four children of her own by then. The math and the geography make Lucy’s involvement in Omar’s birth feasible. Very interesting.

I know many of you probably do not know who Omar Bradley is, but he is definitely worth a Google. The point is a random question gave me a glimpse into my family’s history that I would have never known about otherwise. More discussion focused on the many changes my mother and aunt have witnessed in their lives. I remember when there were no color televisions. They remember when there were no televisions, and record players came with a crank. That’s quite a span of human development.

Encouraging your family members to share stories becomes their legacy to future generations. Without a little effort, these experiences could be lost or forgotten. Patience and a few open-ended questions can be rewarded by an insight into a fascinating family story or encounter. With a little encouragement, I might tell you why my brother and I were featured in a full-page picture in our local paper when we were kids … or the time I was introduced to Miss America at a car show in Pittsburg. Maybe in another column.