Tag Archives: blood

Becoming a Blood Donor

National Blood Donor Month 2017

January is National Blood Donor Month, and it’s the perfect time to make a New Year’s resolution to give.

Resolve to Give Blood

 

Why do you donate? The mother in this article donates knowing the supply isn’t guaranteed.

Giving Blood to Save Lives

 

Get the facts about the value of blood, giving, and eligibility, and find a place to give.

Learn the value of giving from this woman’s firsthand story. She was saved by blood donations.

Saved by Donated Blood

 

Can’t give? Volunteer or host a blood drive to still give back.

Blood Drive to Save Lives

 

Give the gift of life. Some need blood donations to survive.

 

Go digital with the Red Cross’s blood app to schedule appointments, track your donations, and earn rewards.

Track Your Donations On-the-Go

National Kidney Month

National Kidney Month

March is National Kidney Month. Did you know your kidneys filter 200 liters of blood each day?

The Power of Kidneys

 

Your kidneys regulate the salt, potassium, and acid in your body and filter out waste. And they release hormones and produce vitamin D and red blood cells.

Kidneys at Work

 

Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the U.S. More than 26 million have it, and most don’t know it.

Kidneys at Work

 

More than 590,000 Americans have kidney failure. This quiz can tell you if you’re at risk.

Quiz Yourself on Kidney Health

 

Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure. Managing your diabetes is key.

Treatment of Diabetes Begins

 

Subscribe to the Make the Kidney Connection News newsletter for monthly tips on kidney health.

Stay Informed on Kidney News

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Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month

Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month

March is the first-ever Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month. Join us this week in taking the Red Tie Challenge and learn more about these disorders.

Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month

 

More than 3 million Americans suffer from bleeding disorders, like hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, or rare factor deficiencies.

Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder where your blood doesn’t clot normally and can be fatal in emergencies.

The Scope of Hemophilia

 

von Willebrand disease is a bleeding disorder caused by low levels of clotting protein in your blood.

von Willebrand's Reach

 

Join us and those across America taking the Red Tie Challenge and help start a conversation about bleeding disorders.

Take the Red Tie Challenge!

 

It’s the perfect opportunity to learn how to tie the perfect knot.

Tying the Windsor Knot
Image via Chattanooga Time Free Press

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Giving Blood to Save Lives

National Blood Donor Month 2016

January is National Blood Donor Month, and there are reasons donations drop at this time of year, like:

Changing Weather

Winter Blues

Cold & Flu Symptoms

Busy Holiday Schedule

 

Do you know how important your blood donation is? Save a life today.

1 in 7 People

3 Lives

Every 2 Seconds

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Save

Rifling Through the History of Diabetes

The History of Diabetes

Become a Blood Donor

National Blood Donor Month 2015

January is National Blood Donor Month, and we gave you more info about blood and how you can help save lives each day this week.

Are you interested in hosting a blood drive in your community? The American Red Cross can help you save lives.

Did you know that donating 1 pint of blood can save up to 3 lives? Do you know your blood type and who you can donate to? Learn more with the American Red Cross.

Pint

 

Not sure if you’re allowed to donate blood, or how much you can give? The American Red Cross can tell you!

02 11 2014

 

If you’re new to donating blood, The American Red Cross can help you get ready to save lives.

BASE ok

 

If you can’t donate, you can still kick off your new year right by volunteering at a blood drive near you. Find opportunities.

Volunteer

 

This Red Cross video can walk you through the blood donation process step-by-step, so you know exactly what to expect.

 

Now that you’ve given blood, what happens to it? Find out what’s next.

STUDIO INGRID 201 250414

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Understand Blood Pressure

Understanding Blood Pressure

Getting your blood pressure checked is nothing new. But do you understand it all?

What Exactly Is Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure’s the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a common disease when that pressure of the blood flowing through the blood vessels is too high.

If your blood pressure gets too high, it can cause serious damage which can lead to blockage which can cause heart attacks, strokes, and heart failure.

There are 2 main types of high blood pressure:

  • Primary high blood pressure is the most common type and it tends to develop as you age.
  • Secondary high blood pressure is caused by another medical condition or use of certain medicines and it usually goes away when this issue is treated.

Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

  • Age – Men usually develop it around age 45 and women after age 65.
  • Race – High blood pressure and serious complications are more common for African Americans.
  • Family history – It tends to run in families.
  • Certain chronic conditions – Kidney disease, diabetes, and sleep apnea can raise your blood pressure.
  • Stress
  • Pregnancy
  • Being overweight
  • Not being physically active
  • Tobacco use
  • Too much salt
  • Too much alcohol
  • Too little potassium
  • Too little vitamin D

If you have some of these other risk factors, your doctor may set your blood pressure target lower.

What Are the Numbers?

  • Systolic is the pressure in your arteries when your heart contracts, the top number.
  • Diastolic is when your heart rests, the bottom number.

 What Are They Doing?

When a nurse takes your blood pressure, you might wonder what they’re doing. These are the steps they’re following:

  • They wrap the blood pressure cuff around your arm.
  • They place a stethoscope under the cuff at the crease of your elbow (where the major blood vessel of the upper arm is.)
  • They inflate the cuff until it stops the flow of blood.
  • They slowly loosens the cuff’s valve to let the blood start to flow again and listen for sounds in the blood vessel.
  • Then, the first tapping noise they hear, they’ll note as the systolic number, the maximum pressure when the heart contracts.
  • The taps fade, and they note the pressure at the last tap as your diastolic number, the minimum pressure while your heart’s at rest.
  • Along with your numbers, they note which arm they took your blood pressure on and how you were positioned, like sitting with your feet flat.

 Where Should My Numbers Be?

Systolic Measure

Diastolic Measure

What to Do

Normal

Below 120

Below 80

Maintain a healthy lifestyle to avoid raising your levels.

High-normal

120 to 139

80 to 89

Make lifestyle changes.

High

140 to 159

90 to 99

Make lifestyle changes. Possibly start a low-level diuretic.

Extremely High

160 or higher

100 or
higher

Often 1 or 2 meds are required right away, plus lifestyle changes.

Source: Consumer Reports, “onHealth”, Volume 23 Number 2

It’s also normal for your blood pressure to change when you sleep, wake up, are active, and are excited or nervous.

If you’re worried about your blood pressure, keep an eye on your levels and take them with you to your next appointment. A broad look at your numbers can help your doctor put you on the right track for heart health.