Tag Archives: blood sugar

Everyday Diabetes Management

Everyday Diabetes Management

Managing your diabetes, preventing complications, and keeping your blood sugar in a healthy range all require regular maintenance. These simple steps and screenings can help you with your everyday diabetes management.

Steps for Maintaining Your Blood Sugar

Recommended Screenings

  • Have your A1C tested 2 to 4 times per year, with the goal of getting your A1C level below 7.
  • Get an annual eye exam to check for retinopathy, or changes in the blood vessels in the eye. Retinal damage can occur without any symptoms.
  • Have your kidney function checked yearly with a urine test. Diabetes can cause kidney problems and even kidney failure. 
  • Have your doctor perform a foot exam each year to monitor the feeling and circulation in your feet. Diabetes can damage the nerves in your feet, which is called neuropathy.

Learn more about managing your diabetes with our helpful diabetes resources.

Defeat Diabetes Month

Defeat Diabetes Month

It’s Defeat Diabetes Month. 9.4% of Americans have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t even know they have it.

Diabetes affects 1 in 4 people over 65 years old. Managing your diabetes is even more important as you age.

Managing Diabetes As You Age

 

The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood sugar, exercise, and diet change can all help you manage your disease long-term.

These resources are packed with lifestyle tips that can help you make smart day-to-day choices when you have diabetes.

Diabetes can lead to more health problems, like heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and more.

Preventing More Serious Diabetes Complications

 

Curious about the history of diabetes? Learn more about how humans have made sense of it through the years.

Rifling Through the History of Diabetes

The History of Diabetes

Learning About Your Family's Diabetes

Around the Web: You and Your Family’s Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), in 2012, 29.1 million people had diabetes, and 8.1 million of them didn’t even know they had it. Managing you and your family’s diabetes can be a challenge.

Sometimes, you don’t realize the reach the disease can have on your health and your lives.

Diabetes Guides

  • Your diabetes can affect your feet, eyes, and mouth. These guides tell you how diabetes affects them and ways to prevent problems.
  • Controlling your blood sugar through an insulin-based treatment plan can be tricky, but these tips can help.
  • Your blood sugar can also swing for reasons other than what you eat, so awareness is key.
  • When you’re first diagnosed, insulin injections can be a scary part of dealing with your diabetes. This guide can help walk you through the process.
  • You can also check out the YouTube video playlist Diabetes Basics from the ADA to learn more about how diabetes works and ways to protect yourself.

Your Family’s Diabetes

Of the 9.3% of the U.S. population who has diabetes, about 208,000 people are under age 20. And when you’re still growing up, the age difference can change the affects, both physically and emotionally.

The ADA’s page For Parents and Kids is a great place to start as you explore your child’s diabetes. Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy for Life is also an in-depth resource for kids and their families about living with type 2 diabetes.

The National Diabetes Education Program also has these PDFs of helpful info and tips written specifically for teens and their needs:

The ADA also has a page, Everyday Life, that helps you find resources to help your kids live with diabetes through all the stages and events of life. Topics include leaving them with babysitters, telling others, playing sports, and even parties, dating, and driving.

Their YouTube channel also has a playlist of videos to help you make sure your kids are Safe at School.

 

For additional diabetes resources and ways we can help, join our Disease Management program.

Blood Sugar Maintenance

Tips for Managing Your Blood Sugar

Stress and Your Blood Sugar

Everyday stress can make your diabetes  worse by triggering hormones that change blood sugar. Plus, when you’re stressed out, you’re less likely to practice good self-care.

According to Livestrong, stress causes blood glucose to rise by releasing two hormones, cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones increase your glucose in order to help reduce your stress.

Stress can make you emotional, which for many people can lead to binge eating. People usually turn to foods filled with sugar and carbohydrates for comfort, which raise your blood sugar.

To cope with stress and reduce its impact, try to:

  • Breathe deeply. Practice breathing slowly and deeply at least once a day to calm yourself.
  • Move more. Even simple exercises like a quick walk or dancing around the living room can make you feel better.
  • Focus on the positive. Find something you enjoy that takes your mind off whatever is causing your stress.
  • Practice good self-care. Eat right, exercise, and get plenty of sleep.

Move More

Outdoor play helps keep your blood sugar in check. It’s also a great way to have fun with your friends and family.

Do something you love or would like to try. Here are some ideas to get you started!

  • Go fishing at a local lake.
  • Try hiking in a nearby state park.
  • Plant a family garden in your backyard.
  • Ride your bike through your neighborhood.
  • Go roller skating, walking, or running with a friend.
  • Play a backyard sport like basketball or catch with your family.

Remember to check your blood sugar before starting. You might need to eat an extra snack if it’s too low.

If you’re leaving home, pack testing gear, meds, extra snacks, and water. Wear your medical ID bracelet and bring contact numbers and a copy of your emergency plan.

Diabetes shouldn’t stop you from having fun. Just plan ahead so you have what you need, and always take a break right away if you start feeling dizzy.

Planning Ahead

You can never be too prepared with your diabetes. Take time to pack a diabetes emergency kit now before an emergency strikes. Here are some important items for packing the perfect kit:

  • A 3-day supply of:
    • Medicines, marked with their name and correct dose
    • Insulin
    • Insulin pump
    • Lancets
    • Syringes
  • Extra batteries
  • Alcohol wipes for cleaning the injection area
  • A cooler for storing insulin and meds
  • Flashlight, in case you lose power
  • Medical ID bracelet to help first responders quickly know your needs. Your tag should have:
    • Your name
    • Diabetes, insulin pump, or insulin dependent
    • Known allergies
    • Medicines
    • Emergency contact numbers
  • A list of your meds and doses
  • A blood sugar log to help you keep track of your numbers in an emergency
  • Drinks and snacks like water, juice, fruit cups, and hard candies
  • Your doctor’s name and contact information
  • Emergency contact information with cell and work phone numbers, emails, and home addresses

Be sure to update your kit with new meds and supplies as things change. Also, mark on your calendar when your supplies and meds will expire.

There is no better time than now!

Managing Your Diabetes Instantly

Apps for Managing Your Diabetes

These days, we can do almost anything with our phones and tablets, and that includes getting help managing your diabetes. Check out these apps (and more) that the American Diabetes Association recommends.

Managing Your Diabetes On-the-Go

Glucose Buddy

Glucose Buddy has tools to track blood sugar levels, med doses, nutrition, and exercise, including handy graphs. And you can set up phone alerts to remind you when to check your levels.

Carb Counting with Lenny

This app makes learning to eat with type 1 diabetes fun and easy. There is a “Does This Food Have Carbs?” game and pictures of common foods with their carb counts.

Diabetes Nutrition by Fooducate

Eating smart is one of the best ways to control your diabetes. Diabetes Nutrition helps you do that by showing you what is actually in the foods you eat. Scan the barcode to see nutrition facts, added sweeteners, and a health grade for the food. When that food isn’t getting a great grade, just tap the screen to see healthier choices.

LogFrog DB

LogFrog helps track blood sugar levels with a frog as your guide. This app makes logging your levels feel like a game. Graphs show spikes in your levels to help you decide if you should change up your daily plan. You can also set alerts so you always remember to check levels and take your medicine on time. This app is a great option for helping your kids manage their diabetes.

GoMeals

GoMeals helps you eat right, even when you’re away from home. You can look up nutrition facts for restaurant meals and food. You can look at restaurant menus to help you plan ahead for smart choices. You can also track your foods and nutrition after eating.
Packing for Traveling with Diabetes

Packing Your Pump: Traveling with Diabetes

Traveling is already stressful. When you add in you or your family’s diabetes, it just gets worse. But, like all vacation planning, good prep is key to making sure traveling with diabetes goes smoothly.

Preparation for Traveling with Diabetes

It’s best to travel when your diabetes is under control, so schedule a check up with your doctor before your trip if you need to.

Make sure you have enough of current prescriptions to take while traveling. With some things, you can stock up in advance. For others, you may have to take your prescription with you and get it filled on the road. Make sure you also know which pharmacies your plan covers before getting a prescription filled there.

Keep a document that lists all of the medicines and supplies you’re traveling with. Not only can it help you pack before leaving home or the hotel, but you can also show it to security agents at airports to help them check your supplies quickly.

Call or check out your insulin pump company’s website before you fly. Not all pumps can go through the X-ray machines safely, so it’s important to check for yours. If your pump can’t go through, let one of the TSA agents know and ask for a pat down check instead.

Packing for Traveling with Diabetes

According to the TSA, most diabetes supplies, including insulin, pumps, unused syringes, lancets, and blood glucose meters are allowed in your carry-on.

It’s important that you pack supplies and snacks in your carry-on so that you can monitor your diabetes during the flight without problems.

Keep medications in their original containers, and keep them in a separate, clear plastic bag. This makes it easy for security to check what kind of meds you have and that they’re yours.

Use your list to make sure you’ve packed everything you need to take care of your diabetes.

If your kids are traveling without you, it’s important to both help them pack their supplies, and to make sure they have their emergency plan and important numbers, like your phone number and their blood sugar levels, handy when traveling.

At the Airport

Once you’re at the airport, the key to a smooth flight is communication.

Make sure you tell the security officers you are traveling with diabetes supplies and meds and if you need a pat down or your bag checked by hand to protect your pump.

Use a phone, an app, or a watch that can stay on your home time zone, so you can keep track of when you should be eating and taking medicine on your normal schedule. It’s easy to get distracted on vacation, so alarms are also an easy way to remind yourself at the right time.

Once you’re on your flight, if you feel sick and need food, a drink, or to get your carry-on quickly, it can help if you let your flight attendant know what’s happening. They can help you better and faster if they know it’s important for your diabetes.

Always make sure you’re wearing your shoes after you go through security and on your flight. Never go barefoot to protect your feet.

After Arriving

Once you’ve made it to your hotel, it’s a good idea to make sure your supplies are still organized after the flight.

Make sure you’re still keeping track of meals, meds, and your levels like you would at home. Try to plan activities so you’ll have plenty of time to go back to your room to check your levels or take meds, or be ready to bring things with you.

And of course, watch what you eat. Vacation is a good time to enjoy yourself, but still keep a good count of your carbs.

With a little extra planning, diabetes won’t be able to stand in your way of an amazing trip!