Tag Archives: bacteria

Contact Lens Safety Month

Contact Lens Safety Month

It’s Contact Lens Safety Month, and we’ll have tips to help protect your eyes each day this week.

Always make sure you get contact lens prescriptions from an eye doctor and get instructions on lens care when you first get contacts.

Lenses from Your Doctor

 

Don’t reuse contact lens solution. It loses its ability to disinfect them, so use fresh solution each time you take your lenses out.

Fresh Contact Solution

 

Don’t use saline solution for cleaning your lenses. Saline solution is best for rewetting your contacts, but it won’t clean or disinfect them.

When to Use Saline Solution

 

Never re-wet your contacts with saliva. Your mouth is not sterile, and it can easily cause eye infections.

Rewetting Your Contacts

 

If your contacts are bothering you, don’t ignore it. Irritation can be a sign of infections or other problems, so take them out as soon as possible.

Eye Irritation and Contacts

 

Take out your contacts before you shower or swim. Your lenses can trap bacteria from water against your eyes and cause serious infections.

Water and Your Contact Lenses

 

Unless your contacts are specifically designed to wear through the night, never sleep in your contacts. Your lenses can trap bacteria in your eyes, and it’s good to have oxygen flow.

Your Contacts and Sleeping

National Handwashing Awareness Week

National Handwashing Awareness Week

It’s National Handwashing Awareness Week, and washing your hands can significantly reduce the spread of disease.

December is a busy time, and between the rush of the holidays and the weather you are more susceptible to getting sick. Washing your hands can help you avoid germs.

Avoid Holiday Sickness

 

Teaching handwashing to a community can reduce respiratory illnesses in the community, like colds, by 20%.

The Value of Washing Your Hands

 

Know when it matters most to wash! Always wash your hands after going to the bathroom, before, during, and after making food, and after touching an animal.

When to Handwash

 

If you are sick, washing your hands after you blow your nose, cough, or sneeze can help you avoid spreading it to your loved ones.

Fighting the Spread of Germs

 

You should be washing your hands for at least 20 seconds, and make sure to get under your fingernails.

Dry your hands completely to avoid bacteria. If paper towels are available, they’re better for removing germs.

Drying with Paper Towels

 

If you can’t always wash your hands, hand sanitizer is a great alternative. Buy a small bottle for your purse or pocket.

Hand Sanitizer for Cleanliness

Protect Your Children's Dental Health

Foods for Children’s Dental Health

It’s National Children’s Dental Health Month, so we have some recipes to try to work into your kids’ diets that are good for their teeth.

Cheese has been found to raise the PH in your mouth, which lowers risk of tooth decay.

For your adventurous eaters, try this healthy Cheesy Turkey Stuffed Peppers.

Cheesy Turkey Stuffed Peppers
Image and Recipe via Cookie Named Desire

 

Yogurt’s probiotics are good for your gums. Try these 7 Healthy Fro-Yo Recipes.

7 Healthy Fro-Yo Recipes
Image and Recipes via Greatist

 

Leafy greens are high in calcium and vitamins for your teeth. Sneak them in with 20 Healthy Green Smoothie Recipes.

20 Healthy Green Smoothie RecipesImage and Recipe via Yummy Healthy Easy

 

Apples help you produce saliva that rinses out your mouth and is good for your gums.

Try Apple Pie in a Jar for a fun new way to get your kids to eat their apple a day.

Apple Pie in a Jar
Image and Recipe via Vie de la Vegan

 

Carrots can help lower your risk of cavities and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A.

If your kids love pasta, this Raw Carrot Pasta with Peanut Sauce is a great way to get their veggies.

Raw Carrot Pasta with Peanut Sauce
Image and Recipe via Betsy Life

 

Celery has great vitamins that are good for gums, and it acts like a toothbrush scraping out food and bacteria.

The apples in this Celery Root and Apple Salad can help convince your kids to get their veggies in.

Celery Root and Apple SaladImage and Recipe via Gourmande in the Kitchen

 

Almonds are a great source of calcium and protein while being low in sugar.

These Sea Salt Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters taste like candy and are good for your teeth.

Sea Salt Dark Chocolate Almond Clusters
Image and Recipe via Sally’s Baking Addiction

Protecting Your Pets for Christmas

Holiday Pet Safety

You may not have realized that the holidays can be a dangerous time for your furry friends, but these holiday pet safety tips can help.

Make sure your Christmas tree is anchored so it can’t tip and fall when your pets jostle it.

Christmas tree water may contain fertilizers and is a breeding ground for bacteria, which can cause upset stomachs in pets.

Christmas Trees and Your Pets

 

Avoid mistletoe and holly. Holly causes nausea in pets, and mistletoe upsets their stomachs and can cause heart problems.

Avoiding Poisonous Christmas Plants

 

Kitties love sparkly tinsel, but when they nibble on it, it can cause blocked digestive tracts, which can lead to expensive surgery.

Protecting Playful Kitties

 

Keep wires and glass and plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach to avoid electric shocks and cuts to feet and mouths.

Curious Kittens and Ornaments

 

Make sure batteries aren’t left in pets’ reach. They can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus when punctured.

Toy Safety Around Pets

 

As you count down to the new year, avoid confetti strings, which can get stuck in pets’ intestines, and noise poppers and fireworks around timid pets.

Fighting Pet Fear

World Antibiotic Awareness Week

World Antibiotic Awareness Week

It’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week. Why should you care about antibiotic resistance?

Why It Matters

 

Reasons for the world antibiotic resistance crisis include:

  • Patients not finishing their full course of antibiotics

What You Can Do as a Patient

 

  • Health workers over-prescribing antibiotics

What You Can Do as a Health Worker

 

  • The overuse of antibiotics in livestock and fish farming

What You Can Do as a Part of Agriculture

 

  • Poor infection control in hospitals and clinics

How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads

 

  • Lack of hygiene and poor sanitation

What You Can Do as a Policy Maker

 

  • Lack of new antibiotics being developed

WHO_HWC_ 6x infographics_22.10.15

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Preventing Group B Strep

Group B Strep Awareness Month

July is Group B Strep (GBS) Awareness Month, so we’re helping you learn more about it each day.

GBS is a type of bacteria that’s in the digestive track of up to 1 in 4 pregnant women, and can cause babies to be miscarried, stillborn, premature, handicapped, or very sick. Learn more.

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GBS Disease has 3 types, prenatal (during pregnancy), early-onset which happens within your baby’s first week, and late-onset, anytime after 1 week. Learn more.

Cropped shot of a father holding his infant child in the air

 

GBS does have noticeable symptoms! If you’re pregnant, call your doctor if you have less or no fetal movement after your 20th week, or if you have an unexplained fever.

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Once your baby’s born, call you doctor or take them to the ER if they have refuse to eat, sleep too much, have a high or low temp, red skin, or blue or pale skin from not enough oxygen. See the full list of symptoms.

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Babies can be infected with GBS from in the womb until several months old. Women usually don’t have symptoms, but should get infections during pregnancy treated right away.

I could lay here forever

 

You can check for GBS with a urine test during pregnancy if you’re worried you might have it.

6

 

The hospital can also test your baby to see if they have GBS after they’re born, so talk to your doctor about any symptoms you see.

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Flaming Hot

Hot Enough

There’s a good reason to make sure you’re always cooking your meat to the right temps: foodborne illness.

Foodborne illness, or food poisoning, is when you eat or drink foods that are contaminated by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or even poisonous chemicals. There are more than 250 different foodborne illnesses. The top 5 are the most dangerous.

Myths vs. Facts

Myth: Food poisoning is rare and not that serious.

Facts:

Foodborne Illness Stats
Statistics via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Myth: I will know if I have food poisoning.

Facts: Food poisoning is often blamed on things like “a stomach bug,” but it can have many symptoms.

The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, and diarrhea. You could experience all of these or just one. It really depends on what caused it.

Myth: This happened because my food was dirty.

Facts: There are lots of reasons this can happen.

Fresh fruit and veggies can be contaminated if they’re washed in tainted water or touched by unwashed hands or sick people who help process the food.

Some healthy animals have certain kinds of bacteria to help their digestion. These can come in contact with the meat you eat during processing. Salmonella, one of the most dangerous foodborne illnesses, can infect a hen so that its eggs are infected from the start.

Leaving raw food to thaw out of the fridge or leaving cooked food out for too long, like at a potluck or BBQ, can let bacteria grow.

Food coming into contact during cooking with raw meats or dirty cutting boards and knives can spread the bacteria to things that were clean!

What Should I Do?

First, make sure you’re washing your fruits and veggies after you buy them and storing things safely.

Heat can kill bacteria, so always make sure you cook your food to the right temperature. You can do this by using a food thermometer.

Place the thermometer in the thickest part of the food, but it shouldn’t be touching bone or fat. Check the temp toward the end of cooking but before you think it will be done. And make sure to clean it well with hot, soapy water between each use.

Use these handy guides to cook and grill your food to safe temperatures:

Meat & Poultry Temperature Guide
Image via Food Network

 

Grill Master Guide
Image via Visual News

Up Next:

Wondering how long your food is actually good for? We can help make sense of all those dates!

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