Tag Archives: back

Bone and Joint Health National Awareness Week

2015 Bone and Joint Health National Awareness Week

This week is Bone and Joint Health National Awareness Week. 54% of Americans over 18 have these conditions.

Americans and Bone and Joint Conditions

 

1 in 3 people over 18 needed medical care for bone and joint conditions in the last decade, 19% more than the last decade.

Bone and Joint Care

 

Bone and joint conditions are the most common cause of long-term pain and disability worldwide.

Bones and Joints and Long-Term Disabilities

 

Since Baby Boomers started on Medicare, the cost of bone and joint health has risen, and is expected to continue for decades.

The Cost of Bone and Joint Health

 

October 16th was World Arthritis Day. Find an event and resources or get involved.

World Arthritis Day

 

October 17th was World Spine Day. Learn more about protecting your back and spine at work.

October 18th was World Trauma Day. Around the world, people are still learning to protect a life in critical situations. Learn more.

World Trauma Day
Treat Yourself During a Move

My Healthy Journey: Another Year, Another Move

Time to Move, Yet Again

My roommate just got a big job promotion and skipped town on me, which means that while I am thrilled for her, it’s time to move again.

I have moved 13 times since I started college in 2008. I went to school in Chicago, and so each year, I moved all my belongings up in the fall and then back down in the summer. Then my senior year, I moved to Manhattan… and then back to Chicago. And since I’ve been back in Central Illinois, it hasn’t been much better.

So you would think I would be a pro at the nomadic life, right? Wrong.

Moving still stresses me out. They say moving ranks high on the list of life events that cause the most stress, among things like death of a family member and divorce. I don’t know if that’s true, but by the time you get to lucky move number 13, it definitely starts to feel like it.

I’ve already signed a new lease and have until April to get everything out, which puts me in a pretty good situation. But I can feel it hanging over me like a storm cloud.

Even though you’d think the most stressful part of the process would be finding a new home, the truth is for me, that physically moving all my stuff is what I dread the most.

So here it is.

My Plan to Stay Sane for My ONLY Move in 2015

(No, really, I mean it. I refuse to move again until 2016.):

1. Make a list.

I’ll make the biggest list you’ve ever seen, so I don’t forget anything. I’m going to make a schedule, so I know which days I need to pack which rooms. Plus, this will remind me to set aside time for things like setting up my electricity, water, and renter’s insurance.

2. Do a little every day.

I’m going to plan it just right so that I get a load of stuff moved in each day when I commute before the big final furniture push. Because moving one load a day sounds totally doable, right?

3. I’m going to burn all my books…

That’s a lie. I love my books. But moving them for the 13th time will make me reconsider my life choices the next time I’m having trouble leaving Barnes & Noble without 6 new hardcovers. It’ll be great for my wallet! Positives people, focus on the positives.

4. Take my time.

I have two and a half weeks to make the switch, no need to go crazy trying to do it all the first weekend.

5. Clear out the clutter.

Each time I move, I swear I eliminate at least 3 boxes of stuff when I realize that half of the things I move, I WILL NEVER NEED AGAIN. What will go this time?! Round and round it goes! Where it lands, nobody knows…. DingDingDing! We have a winner! It’s time for those college notebooks to GO! (It’s wise to do this before physically moving them to the new place and discovering you don’t have anywhere to put any of it, trust me.)

6. Get help.

I’m going to wrangle every innocent passerby into helping me with the offer of cookies and all of the FREE things that I was planning to throw away or donate! Okay, not really. (Warning: Don’t actually welcome total strangers into your new home.) But I will torture all the family members who are still talking to me 13 moves in.

7. Stay fueled.

I’m going to get plenty of sleep and eat well. This means I will not binge on TV shows instead of sleeping. (Must not start House of Cards. Must not start House of Cards…) And I will eat a proper number of (preferably) healthy calories. Then I will have enough energy to move without replacing all bodily fluids with coffee, as I have in past moves.

8. Don’t fight the elements.

I will pay close attention to the weather, which I’m usually really bad about, so that I don’t try to move my mattress in a snowstorm  and so that I do not fall on ice and break my hip.

9. Stay safe.

I will protect my back by packing correctly (heavy items in the right size boxes and on the bottom, not overpacking, etc, etc.), not falling on the ice from #8, wearing a brace when needed, and lifting with my knees. Also by having very little furniture.

10. Control myself.

I will not unpack EVERYTHING the first day I get there. My more obsessive habits usually take over, and I must have everything perfect before I will sit down. It’s exhausting. I will not do this.

11. Focus on the positives.

My, what a wonderful, long workout this is! My new apartment is newer and nicer and will therefore be much warmer than the older house I’ve been in, (my feet will finally thaw!). My complex has a gym! And pools! It is about five minutes from my work, getting rid of my long commute, wasted gas, and added miles on my car. And because I have almost no furniture, this is a wonderful opportunity to reinvent my home. Would I like to pretend I live on the beach? In a Frank Lloyd Wright house? The future? Or perhaps Downton Abbey? The options are endless! (Or, you know, whatever’s cheapest.)

12. Treat myself.

This means that I am buying ice cream post-move. Oh, and a terrarium. What is a terrarium you ask? They’re these awesome little plant ecosystems that you keep in glass jars and bowls in your house that look kind of like this:

Look a Terrarium!

They’re adorable, they never grow too big, and you only have to water them like every two weeks. Much better than a houseplant.

13. Find my normal.

Then I will resume my schedule of working/eating/cuddling my dog in bed to Netflix/sleeping. And then I can focus on my 2015 goals of finishing my novel, getting fit, and actually watching every Oscar-nominated movie of 2015 (and 2014… and 2013…)

So there you have it, the perfect plan, ready to go for your next (now) stress-free move! You’re welcome.

Wish me luck.

Wintertime Worries and Falling

Falling and SAD in the Winter

The air is getting crisper and unfortunately, the sun shines less and less. Before we know it, snowflakes and ice will begin to fall. These wintery mixes can compromise both our balance and mental health. Both falling and SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) can come with the winter weather.

Falling

Each year, more than 300,000 injuries result from falls. Give yourself plenty of time and don’t rush around. Be especially careful getting into and out of your car by holding onto the door or framework for support.

If you must carry things, try to distribute the weight evenly and carry them below waist level, to help keep your center of gravity low. Go down icy stairs sideways.

Take short, flat-footed steps with your feet slightly farther apart than normal with your hands out of your pockets. Keep your eyes on the ground in front of you.

Wear boots or shoes with good traction. Rubber soles are better than plastic or leather. If you wear heels, wear wedges of no more than 2 inches. Once you’re inside, wipe and dry your shoes off to prevent creating slippery conditions inside too.

If you do lose your footing, try to fall so your thighs, hips, then shoulders hit the ground in that order, to keep your arms from taking all your body weight and possibly breaking. Tuck and bend your back and head toward your chest to keep from smacking your head.

SAD

A person suffering from SAD usually experiences depression and unexplained fatigue throughout the winter, while his or her symptoms disappear with the return of spring.

The reasons for developing SAD are still largely unknown, although experts believe it’s somehow triggered by decreased exposure to sunlight.

The symptoms are very similar to depression, but someone with SAD will experience these changes in mood and behavior in a regular, seasonal pattern.

A person with SAD or depression may have a few or all of the symptoms, like loss of energy, changes in mood, trouble concentrating, appetite changes, and weight gain.

Once you’re diagnosed, your doctor may prescribe antidepressants for just the months you need them. Another option is light therapy. Light therapy uses a special light panel or box that mimics the light from the sun.