Tag Archives: annual

Your Preventive Care

Your Yearly Preventive Care and Physical

Getting your yearly physical, where you can get covered preventive care and screenings, helps you be your healthiest. It’s important that you not only know what’s recommended for your age and what you need to stay up to date, but also that you get to the doctor for this each year!

What Happens at Your Physical

Each year, you should schedule a physical with your doctor to focus on your health and wellness. At the appointment, you can:
  • Keep track of your health habits and history
  • Get a physical exam
  • Stay up-to-date with preventive care
  • Get education and counseling and set health goals

Health Habits & History

One of the first things that happens at your annual appointment is a nurse or your doctor will ask you to answer some questions about your health and family history, including questions about:
  • Your medical history
  • Your family history
  • Your sexual health and partners
  • Your eating and exercise habits
  • Your use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs
  • Your mental health history, including depression
  • Your relationships and safety
This info can help you in the future. From getting diagnosed to being protected and helping you in an emergency, this information can help save your life.

Physical Exam

At your yearly physical, you can expect your doctors or nurses to:
  • Measure your height and weight
  • Calculate your body mass index (BMI) to check if you’re at a healthy weight
  • Take your blood pressure and temperature
From there, your doctor may give you your regular preventive care screenings and shots or refer you to a specialist for certain screenings, counseling, or care.

Preventive Care

As an adult, certain preventive care and screenings are covered for you, depending on timing and what your doctor recommends.
Immunizations (Shots)
Doses, recommended timing, and need for certain immunizations can vary based on your case:
  • Diphtheria
  • Flu shot
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Herpes Zoster
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal
  • Mumps
  • Pertussis
  • Pneumococcal
  • Rubella
  • Tetanus
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)
Condition Screenings & Care
  • Aspirin use – To prevent heart disease for adults of a certain ages
  • Cholesterol screening – For adults of certain ages or at higher risk
  • Blood pressure screening
  • Type 2 diabetes screening – For adults with high blood pressure
  • Colorectal cancer screening – For adults over 50
  • Depression screening
Weight Management
  • Obesity screening and counseling
  • Diet counseling – For adults at higher risk for chronic disease
Alcohol & Tobacco Use
  • Alcohol misuse screening and counseling
  • Tobacco use screening – For all adults and cessation interventions for tobacco users
  • Lung cancer screening – For adults 55 to 80 at high risk for lung cancer because they’re heavy smokers or have quit in the past 15 years
  •  Abdominal aortic aneurysm – A one-time screening for men of certain ages who have ever smoked
Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Screenings
  • Sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling  – For adults at higher risk
  • Hepatitis B screening – For people at high risk, including people from countries with 2% or more Hepatitis B prevalence, and American-born people not vaccinated as infants and with at least one parent born in a region with 8% or more Hepatitis B prevalence
  • Hepatitis C screening – For adults at increased risk and once for everyone born from 1945 to 1965
  • HIV screening – For everyone ages 15 to 65 and other ages at increased risk
  •  Syphilis screening – For adults at higher risk
Women also have some additional covered screenings and benefits. Get more details about this specific preventive care while learning about your well-woman visits. And learn more about what preventive care the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends you get and when.

Education, Counseling & Health Goals

Your doctor can help you manage your conditions or diseases and prevent future problems by talking to you about your life and health each year. Your doctor might have valuable handouts, websites, advice, and information to help you take care of yourself or might want to refer you to a specialist who can help you further. Your doctor is also the perfect person to help you set goals to maintain or improve your health. From quitting smoking and knowing how to self-check for cancer to changing your diet and exercise for your weight, cholesterol, or blood pressure, your doctor can help you plan to be your healthiest.

Prepare for Your Visit

Preparing yourself with questions to ask and answers to your doctor’s questions can help you make the most of your visit.

Know Your Family History

Your family’s history of health and wellness is an important part of your own health record. Histories of illness and disease can help doctors look out for issues that run in families and more. This family health history tool can help you track your family’s health, so that you’re always organized to talk to your doctor. Not sure about your family history? Filling this out is the perfect time to talk to family members for firsthand details.

Talk to Your Doctor

Prepare for your appointment by knowing any questions or issues you want to talk about ahead of time. Some things you might want to ask:
  • What immunizations or shots you need
  • Your diet and eating healthy food
  • Advice for exercise and getting active
  • Mental health concerns, like depression and anxiety
  • Specific issues you might be having, like sore joints, back pain, migraines, and more

Know What’s Covered

Learn more about your covered immunizations. And log in to Your Health Alliance or search by your member number to see what preventive care your plan covers. You can use our general preventive care guidelines and prescription drugs or our Medicare preventive care guidelines to get an idea of what our plans cover. If you’re not sure what’s covered and what you’ll need a preauthorization for, you can check your coverage and preauthorization lists at Your Health Alliance. Now that you’re ready to go to your annual physical, log in to Your Health Alliance if you need to set a Primary Care Provider (PCP) and find a covered doctor, or start searching for doctors in our network.
Healthy Vision Month

Healthy Vision Month

May is Healthy Vision Month, so we had more info about protecting your eyes each day.

Taking care of your eyes is important at every age. Routine eye exams are especially important with kids who might not know or be able to tell you if something’s wrong with their vision. Learn more.

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Your medical history isn’t just important to your primary doctor. Things like your family’s history, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain medications can affect your eyes too.

Eye exams check for lots of things, like making sure your pupil reacts correctly to light and your side vision, which the loss of can point to glaucoma.

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Eye exams can also check for more rare problems, like colorblindness with simple tests like this one:

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The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends an eye disease screening for adults by age 40, when signs of the disease and changes in vision from age start to occur. Talk to your doctor and protect your vision!

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Your eye doctor uses regular eye exams to both prescribe glasses and to make sure that prescription stays up-to-date so you can always see your best.

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Keeping up with your glasses or contacts’ prescription and having clean habits with your contacts are important to protecting your vision.

Close-up of two contact lenses with drops on light background.

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Women's Health and Taking Control

National Women’s Health Week

Next week is National Women’s Health Week, so had more info on the subject each day this week.

Are you wondering what steps you should be taking for better health? It’s different for every age. Find out what you should be doing.

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Did you know your annual well-woman visit is covered by your insurance? Don’t let anything stand in the way for getting screened. Things to know about your visit:

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Get active! You can reduce your risk of many diseases by exercising for just 30 minutes a day. So skip that Friends rerun and get busy:

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Your mental health and stress can hurt your physical health, and women are more likely to have anxiety and PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)sm. Tips to take care of your brain too:

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Risky actions are unhealthy for you, and your family. Protect them by making smart choices:

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What you put in your body matters, and you have to make those decisions 200 times a day! Make smart ones for better health:

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Take the National Women’s Health Week pledge to join women across the nation who are coming together to take a step towards better health.

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Wellness Visits to Prevent

Vantage Point: Wellness Visits – Well Worth Your Time

Every spring I look forward to taking my horse for a checkup. I like to hear how healthy and well taken care of he is. I cannot say I feel the same about taking time from my busy schedule for my own yearly wellness visits. Still, as I read my recent screening results and compared them to last year, I saw my scores got better. That makes me feel good about taking care of myself.

I also like the quality time I get with my doctor compared to more urgent visits when I’m sick. During the wellness exam, doctors really take the time to ask how you feel, talk about concerns and help you set health goals to help keep problem visits at bay.

Health Alliance Medicare plans cover wellness visits at no charge. Our plans also cover the routine screenings that are right for your age and gender. Please note, though, that if you bring up a problem during the wellness visit and your doctor treats or helps you deal with that problem, you might have to pay for the visit. Remember, your health is most important, so don’t be afraid to share concerns with your doctor, just be aware that doing so could change the visit from a wellness visit to something else.

Wellness (also called preventive) visits change when you move to Medicare. Medicare covers a “Welcome to Medicare” exam within 12 months of getting your Medicare Part B benefit and an annual wellness visit after that. Be sure to say you have Medicare when you schedule the exam so it is billed correctly.

Health Alliance Medicare supports members not just when they’re sick, but throughout their lives, and focuses on prevention by covering the wellness exams, immunizations, and disease screenings you need. In addition, Health Alliance Medicare may offer you a free health risk assessment with our nurse practitioner, right in the convenience of your own home. If so, I encourage you say yes to this important and free part of your coverage.

Like I do with my horse, sometimes we take care of others better than we do ourselves. But early detection of health problems through a wellness visit can save your life. The time is well worth it.