Tag Archives: American Diabetes Association

Controlling Carbohydrates for a Healthy Lifestyle with Diabetes

Around the Web: Your Healthy Lifestyle for Diabetes

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, it affects many parts of your life. Making healthy lifestyle choices is important when trying to manage your diabetes.

Things you might not think about, like sleep, stress, and salt, can affect your diabetes. Keep these lifestyle tips in mind.

Your food choices have a huge impact on your blood sugar, and a healthy diet is a key piece of the puzzle when it comes to managing your diabetes. Counting carbohydrates can be an important part of managing your diabetes, especially if you use insulin, and this WebMD guide can help.

Sometimes, it can feel like diabetes is limiting your choices when it comes to food, but there are still lots of options. This list goes over 11 Drinks for People With Diabetes, so you have more options than water, and this guide can even help you choose the occasional cocktail safely.

You can also check out these helpful examples of the best and worst meals for dining out with diabetes.

The American Diabetes Association’s YouTube channel has a Healthy Eating and Recipes playlist with video tutorials to help you choose and prepare healthy meals.

Exercise is also an essential part of any healthy lifestyle. It’s important to get up and get out there for your body and for your diabetes.

Try these 10 muscle moves that help with your diabetes to begin strength training.

These tips can help you use exercise to prevent diabetes-related nerve pain and to improve your balance.

For more workouts and a huge variety of healthy recipes, head over to our Pinterest. And to learn more about nutrition, weight management, and the great fitness discounts we offer to our members, visit our online Wellness section.

Learning About Your Family's Diabetes

Around the Web: You and Your Family’s Diabetes

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), in 2012, 29.1 million people had diabetes, and 8.1 million of them didn’t even know they had it. Managing you and your family’s diabetes can be a challenge.

Sometimes, you don’t realize the reach the disease can have on your health and your lives.

Diabetes Guides

These visual guides can help you understand the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Your diabetes can affect your feet,  eyes, and mouth. These guides tell you how diabetes affects them, and ways to prevent problems.

Controlling your blood sugar through an insulin-based treatment plan can be tricky, but these tips can help.

Your blood sugar can also swing for reasons other than what you eat, so awareness is key.

When you’re first diagnosed, insulin injections can be a scary part of dealing with your diabetes. This guide can help walk you through the process.

You can also check out the YouTube video playlist Diabetes Basics from the ADA to learn more about how diabetes works and ways to protect yourself.

Your Family’s Diabetes

Of the 9.3% of the U.S. population who has diabetes, about 208,000 people are under age 20. And when you’re still growing up, the age difference can change the affects, both physically and emotionally.

The ADA’s page For Parents and Kids is a great place to start as you explore your child’s diabetes. Be Healthy Today; Be Healthy for Life is also an in-depth resource for kids and their families about living with type 2 diabetes.

The National Diabetes Education Program also has these PDFs of helpful info and tips written specifically for teens and their needs:

The ADA also has a page, Everyday Life, that helps you find resources to help your kids live with diabetes through all the stages and events of life. Topics include leaving them with babysitters, telling others, playing sports, and even parties, dating, and driving.

Their YouTube channel also has a playlist of videos to help you make sure your kids are Safe at School.

For additional resources and ways we can help, visit us online and join our Diabetes Disease Management program.

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

This month is American Diabetes Month, and this year is all about helping Americans get cooking to stop diabetes. We will give you more info each day this week.

Get Moving Mondays are all about getting you active and helping you keep a healthy lifestyle all week long.

And visit our health and wellness tool Rally or our Pinterest workout board to get active today!

Tasty Tip Tuesdays are about making sure that people can prevent diabetes with a healthy diet, and still eat delicious food.

And visit our Pinterest for healthy swap info and recipes.

What’s Cooking Wednesdays help you choose healthy recipes for your holiday meals to help prevent diabetes.

And visit our Pinterest Thanksgiving board for more healthy holiday recipes.

Get Together Thursdays are all about hosting events to cook to prevent diabetes with your friends and family, and make healthy choices together.

And find healthy recipes, cocktails and more on our Pinterest.

Fact Check Friday will challenge your knowledge about nutrition and diabetes with questions from the American Diabetes Association. Share them and spread the knowledge!

Weekend Challenge to Stop Diabetes is an opportunity to help raise funds to stop it. Visit the American Diabetes Association to find fun ways to help today.

Still feeling like you don’t know much about diabetes? Visit the American Diabetes Association (link below,) or find more resources on our Disease Management page.

Get more info on this weekly schedule!

Barbeques

Oh, Sweet Summertime Barbecues!

Warm weather and barbecues go hand in hand. With so many tempting foods, it can be work to control your cravings. BBQ sauce, cheese, sweet drinks, and desserts can all be sugar-filled. So, as much as you want to enjoy everything, it’s important to do it in moderation.

Did you know that the average meal at barbecues has over 1,600 calories and 170 grams of carbohydrates?

Of course, meal plans are different from person to person, but the American Diabetes Association (ADA), recommends a normal meal have 45 to 60 grams of carbs. In just two tablespoons of BBQ sauce, you can rack up 15 grams of carbs and 10 grams of sugar. That’s before you even get to the s’mores!

But there are some easy ways to stay on track at summertime barbecues.

Tips for Cutting Calories at Barbecues

Fill your plate using the diabetes plate method. Load at least half your plate with non-starchy veggies, like grilled zucchini and peppers, leaving only a quarter of your plate for starchy veggies like corn and potato salad. Fill the last quarter with proteins like chicken or a turkey burger.

Serve or bring a tray of non-starchy veggies like carrots, celery, tomatoes, peppers and broccoli. Add a non-fat dip like salsa, fat-free dressing, or hummus.

Remember, non-starchy vegetables have about 5 grams of carbohydrate in 1 cup raw (½ cup cooked). These carbs are usually fiber, so unless you eat more than 2 cups raw, you probably don’t need to count the carbs.

Create a salad bar. Leafy greens, low-fat cheese, nuts (almond slices or walnuts), and a side of low-fat salad dressing go great with BBQ.

Pack flavored seltzer water or add fruit wedges to ice-cold water for a healthy and refreshing drink.

Make your own BBQ sauce. Combine:

  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1 cup diet cola
  • 1 tablespoon onion flakes or diced onion
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 minced garlic clove
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for five minutes.

 

For dessert, try this tropical fruit salad with mango-flavored chutney from Diabetes Forecast:

Peeled and diced:

  • 2 small kiwis
  • 1 large banana
  • 1 medium orange
  • 1 medium mango

Sauce

  • 1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt
  • 2 tablespoon mango chutney
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon cardamom

 

Happy grilling and check out our Pinterest for more recipes.

Managing Your Diabetes Instantly

Apps for Managing Your Diabetes

These days, we can do almost anything with our phones and tablets, and that includes getting help managing your diabetes. Check out these apps (and more) that the American Diabetes Association recommends.

Managing Your Diabetes On-the-Go

Glucose Buddy

Glucose Buddy has tools to track blood sugar levels, med doses, nutrition, and exercise, including handy graphs. And you can set up phone alerts to remind you when to check your levels.

Carb Counting with Lenny

This app makes learning to eat with type 1 diabetes fun and easy. There is a “Does This Food Have Carbs?” game and pictures of common foods with their carb counts.

Diabetes Nutrition by Fooducate

Eating smart is one of the best ways to control your diabetes. Diabetes Nutrition helps you do that by showing you what is actually in the foods you eat. Scan the barcode to see nutrition facts, added sweeteners, and a health grade for the food. When that food isn’t getting a great grade, just tap the screen to see healthier choices.

LogFrog DB

LogFrog helps track blood sugar levels with a frog as your guide. This app makes logging your levels feel like a game. Graphs show spikes in your levels to help you decide if you should change up your daily plan. You can also set alerts so you always remember to check levels and take your medicine on time. This app is a great option for helping your kids manage their diabetes.

GoMeals

GoMeals helps you eat right, even when you’re away from home. You can look up nutrition facts for restaurant meals and food. You can look at restaurant menus to help you plan ahead for smart choices. You can also track your foods and nutrition after eating.

Treating Diabetes with Glucose Checks

Treating Diabetes

There isn’t a cure for diabetes, but it is very treatable. Treating diabetes depends on which type of diabetes you have.

Type 1 Diabetes

Because those with type 1 diabetes can’t produce enough of their own insulin, they must treat their diabetes with insulin injections.

Type 2 Diabetes

For many, treatment for type 2 diabetes focuses on diet and exercise. If blood sugar levels stay high, oral medications can help your body better produce insulin.

In some cases, insulin injections are used.

For those who who are at risk of TOFI type 2 diabetes, it’s important to:

  • Exercise, which is the only way to shed fat on the abdominal organs.
  • Lower stress, which can temporarily raise your blood sugar.
  • Diet smart by avoiding “diet foods” that are actually loaded with sugar, like low-fat salad dressings and vitamin drinks.

Gestational Diabetes

Treatment for gestational diabetes needs to happen quickly to protect you and your baby.

Treatment tries to keep your blood sugar levels at the same levels as healthy pregnant women’s through a combination of these:

  • Specialized meal plans
  • Regular, scheduled physical activity
  • Daily blood sugar testing
  • Insulin injections

It’s important to work with your doctor to make a treatment plan in all cases, but especially with gestational diabetes where personal changes are important for protecting your baby.

Testing

The A1c test measures your average blood sugar level over 2-3 months. Your doctor will generally order it every 3-6 months depending on which type of diabetes you have to keep an eye on how your treatment is working.

For most adults, the American Diabetes Association’s suggests your A1c be under 7%, but your doctor will help you decide what’s best for you. Studies show that people with diabetes keep normal A1c levels live five years longer, on average.

Checking your blood sugar with your personal meter helps you manage your treatment on a day-to-day basis. It gives you info right away to help you make decisions about taking your insulin, when to exercise, and tell you if you’re on track.

Keeping normal blood sugar levels reduces the risk of high cholesterol, and controlling your cholesterol can lower heart complications by 50%.

These two tests work together to tell you how your diabetes management is going. This chart shows what an A1c level translates to in blood sugar levels:

A1c         Average Blood Sugar (mg/dl)

6%                             126

7%                             154

8%                             183

9%                             212

10%                           240

11%                           269

12%                           298

Insulin Injections

The biggest challenge to people who are treating diabetes with insulin injections is balancing exactly how much insulin you need to take, which can vary based on:

  • Food
  • Exercise
  • Stress
  • Current emotions
  • General health

Not balancing these factors and your insulin can result in hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia.

Hypoglycemia is when you eat too little food, take too much insulin or diabetes meds, or get extra exercise, which causes your blood sugar levels to be too low.

Hyperglycemia is when you eat too much food, don’t take enough insulin, or are stressed or sick, and then your blood sugar levels are too high.

The best way to know if your blood sugar is high or low is to test your levels. But it’s also good to know the warning signs:

Hypoglycemia

  • Shaky
  • Dizzy
  • Nervous
  • Sweaty
  • Hungry
  • Clumsy
  • Confused
  • Trouble paying attention
  • Tingling mouth
  • Headache
  • Pale face
  • Seizure
  • Passing out

Hyperglycemia

  • Going to the bathroom a lot
  • Thirsty
  • Tired
  • Weak
  • Blurry vision
  • Hungry, even when you’ve eaten.

When your blood sugar level is too low, you can:

  • Eat or drink something with 15 grams of carbs:
    • Try three glucose tablets, 4 ounces of apple or orange juice, 4 ounces regular soda, 1 tablespoon cake frosting or three Jolly Ranchers.
    • Wait 15 minutes, and then check your blood glucose level again.
    • If your blood glucose is still too low, eat another 15 grams of carbs. Wait another 15 minutes, and then check your blood glucose again. You may want to keep eating until you feel better, but it’s very important to wait the full 15 minutes.

If you or your care team feel your signs are serious, inject glucagon which is the opposite of insulin—it raises your blood glucose level.

If your blood sugar is high, it’s important to remember that one high blood sugar reading isn’t a big deal, it happens to everyone from time to time. But if you keep running high day after day, talk to your doctor.

No matter what, it’s important to talk to your doctor and care team about the best way to manage your diabetes and how to handle these situations.

Summer Camp in Care

Summer Camp with Diabetes

Almost every kid wants to go to summer camp. It’s a place to hike, swim, play, learn new things, and make new friends. But you may feel like your kid’s disease is standing in their way.

The American Diabetes Association sponsors summer camp specifically for kids with diabetes. They’ll have a a great time with traditional camp activities and meet other kids with diabetes. And they’ll have daily diabetes care from health care professionals, as well as education about living with their disease.

You can donate, help start a summer camp, or find the nearest summer camp for your kids on the ADA’s website.

Check Out Nearby Summer Camps

Illinois

Camp Confidence
Des Plaines, IL
Ages: 4 to 9 years

Camp Discovery
Glen Ellyn, IL
Ages: 4 to 9 years

Camp Crossroads
Chicago
Ages: 4 to 9 years

Camp Granada
Monticello, IL
Ages: 8 to 16 years

Triangle D Camp
Ingleside, IL
Ages: 9 to 13 years

Teen Adventure Camp
Ingleside, IL
Ages: 14 to 18 years

Camp Can Do
Palos Park, IL
Ages: 4 to 9 years

Indiana

Camp John Warvel
North Webster, IN
Ages: 7 to 17 years