Tag Archives: affordable

Canned Food Month

Canned Food Month

It’s Canned Food Month, and canned ingredients can be key to having a versatile pantry that can help you whip up all kinds of dishes quickly, and they’re affordable!

First up is a super simple and light Pumpkin Mousse that’s like pie without the crust.

Pumpkin Mousse

 

Make the most of canned beans and tomatoes and pack in the winter veggies with homemade Minestrone Soup.

Minestrone Soup
Image and Recipe via Carl’s Bad Cravings

 

Hummus is a super simple dip that makes the most of canned chickpeas. Try these 4 flavors.

Homemade Hummus (four flavors)

 

Meal prep these Black Bean Breakfast Bowls for easy, savory breakfast all week long.

Black Bean Breakfast Bowls

 

Whip up this Lemony Lentil and Chickpea Salad with Radish and Herbs for a hearty lunch or side.

Lemony Lentil and Chickpea Salad with Radish and Herbs
Image and Recipe via Cookie and Kate

 

This Chipotle Ground Turkey Chili is the perfect meal to make out of your pantry’s canned goods.

Chipotle Ground Turkey Chili

 

You won’t believe this gorgeous Coconut Pineapple Cake is made with canned pineapple.

Coconut Pineapple Cake

Coconut Pineapple Cake

National Home Care and Hospice Month

National Home Care and Hospice Month

November is National Home Care and Hospice Month. Home health care includes a wide range of care you can get for an illness or injury at home.

Home care is usually less expensive, more convenient, and just as effective as care in a hospital.

Home Care

 

Hospice is special care for people who are terminally ill, including medical and physical care and help with social, emotional, and spiritual needs.

Hospice Care

 

An important part of home care and hospice is being prepared for the future. Document your decisions for your loved ones.

Preparing for the Future

 

If you’re a caregiver, you should understand your loved ones’ home care and hospice options.

Prepared Caregivers

 

If you or a loved one has a serious issue, palliative care, or specialized medical care tailored to you, can help relieve your symptoms and improve your life.

Planning for Long-Term Care

 

Advance directives help your loved ones carry out your wishes in life-threatening circumstances. Have yours ready.

Having Your Advance Directives Ready

Affordable Health Services for National Health Center Week

National Health Center Week 2015

This week is National Health Center Week, so we had more info about finding these resources each day.

The Champaign Urbana Public Health District’s website can connect you to local health resources and info and Board of Health info.

Care

 

The Francis Nelson Health Center in Champaign provides care to those who need it most and can’t afford it. Learn more about their services or help the cause.

If you’re a University of Illinois student, McKinley Health Center is your first stop for all kinds of health information, including online classes.

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The Champaign County Christian Health Center offers free and quality health services. Learn more about making appointments, giving, fundraising, and volunteering.

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Avicenna Community Health Center has been providing health screenings and learning to the CU community since 2009. Learn about what they do and how you can help.

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While Medicaid in Illinois has expanded, there are other ways to get help too. Carle’s Community Care Discount Program helps people get the care they need.

Health Insurance Policy brochure

 

Looking for health centers across the nation? This government database can help!

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Versatile Healthy Pepper Recipes

Healthy Pepper Recipes

Bell peppers are in-season, and they’re so versatile that you can use them for any meal with these healthy pepper recipes.

First up was a tasty twist on a classic, Philly Cheesesteak Stuffed Peppers.

Philly Cheesesteak Stuffed Peppers
Image and Recipe via She’s the Bross

 

These Easy Oven Fajitas are an easy and affordable take on your restaurant favorite.

Easy Oven Fajitas

 

This Cauliflower Roasted Red Pepper Soup is a healthy and delicious lunch or dinner option.

Cauliflower Roasted Red Pepper Soup

 

Try making this Easy Pepper Steak at home instead of picking up your usual Chinese takeout.

Easy Pepper Steak

 

Make homemade Mini Pepper Nachos for a healthy take on the bar-menu classic.

Mini Pepper Nachos
Image and Recipe via Closet Cooking

 

Steak Fajita Stuffed Baked Potatoes with Avocado Chipotle Crema are a delicious all-in-one meal.

Steak Fajita Stuffed Baked Potatoes with Avocado Chipotle Crema

 

These Homemade Focaccia and Roasted Red Pepper and Arugula Sandwiches are perfect for this week’s lunches.

Homemade Focaccia + Roasted Red Pepper & Arugula Sandwiches

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Fresh Fiddlehead Ferns at Your Farmers Market

Making the Most of a Farmers Market

There are lots of reasons to get out to your local farmers market, but going to a farmers market for the first time is very different than going to the supermarket. We can help make sure it goes smoothly with these tips from a farmers market veteran:

1. Prepare.

  • Illinois has a Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program that gives you a free booklet of checks that you can use at local markets. Check it out on the Illinois Department on Aging’s site for details and participating counties and markets .
  • Many vendors only take cash (and some take SNAP and WIC benefits). Some booths only take small bills, 20s and smaller.
  • Many vendors don’t offer bags, so it’s a good idea to bring a few cloth ones you can use.
  • Most markets don’t allow dogs, so leave them at home.
  • Have an idea of what is in stock at that time of year, so you know what to expect. Use this map to find out what’s in season where you live.

2. Check the info booth first. If your market has an info booth, check there before you start shopping. The people working can let you know if there are any special things going on that day, like cooking demos.

Certain markets, like the new Champaign Farmers’ Market downtown, have special deals for SNAP users, so it’s always good to check with the info booth. At their market, they will double up to $20 of benefits per person while funds last when you bring your Link card to the market booth!

3. Go early or go late. If you go early, you will have first pick of the freshest and largest selection. If you go late, some farmers will offer discounts to clear out their stock before heading home.

4. Take a lap. Unless you know your market really well, don’t just buy the first things you see. By walking a lap through the market first, you can get the lay of the land, compare prices and selection, and taste samples.

5. Talk to the farmers. The farmers can answer questions about how the food was grown and harvested, talk about why their produce is or is not organic, offer recipes, give info about something you’ve never tasted, or recommend their favorites.

6. Be mindful. It’s considered rude to squeeze stone fruits, like peaches, plums, or tomatoes, because it can bruise them. And it’s considered rude to open husks of corn before buying them, which can actually make them less sweet. Also, look for whole produce, meaning veggies like carrots and beets with their green tops still whole. These will stay fresh longer, and you can make things like pesto sauces with the greens.

7. Take a risk. Sometimes you find things that are new, different, or even strange at the farmer’s market. This is the perfect opportunity to try something new because the farmers can usually give you advice on how best to use it.

8. Bring a friend or the family. Grocery shopping, unlike the farmers market, can feel like a chore. Take people with you to talk and walk with outside, and the farmer’s market instantly becomes a more fun activity. And you can always save money and split certain produce.

9. Keep it simple. When you’re cooking your food at home, go for simple recipes. Because you bought such fresh produce, you should let it shine. Put fresh wild strawberries over a salad or in a breakfast parfait instead of baking them into a cake. If you’re worried you won’t be able to use all of something you bought you can always freeze it and use the rest later. Use this guide from the FDA to make sure you’re storing and washing produce correctly.

10. Find the right market. Many areas have more than one farmers market within driving distance. If you can, test them all. Large farmer’s markets have a lot of energy, selection, and sometimes even dining options, but smaller markets often have good deals. Find the one that works best for you.

Find farmer’s markets near you. Learn more about which ones take SNAP and WIC, or check out this list of all the farmer’s markets that take Illinois Link Benefits.

Up Next:

Do you really understand what you’re getting when you buy organic? We break it down in Organic 101.

And make sure you’re cleaning your fresh fruits and veggies the right way to keep your family safe.

Fresh Marionberries at Farmers Markets

Why You Should Be Shopping at Farmers Markets

You should try shopping at your local farmers markets for these 6 reasons:

1. It can save you money. At a farmers market, you can pick out exactly how much of something you need. Only need one carrot? No need to buy a bunch you won’t use, like you might have to do at the grocery store.

And the produce at a farmer’s market is only what’s fresh and in-season. It’s also local. At the grocery store, you’re paying for your fruit to be shipped across the country from where it is in-season. By buying your fruits and veggies locally based on what is fresh, you stop paying your food’s travel costs.

Illinois also has a Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program that gives you a free booklet of checks that you can use at local markets. Find details and participating counties and markets on the Illinois Department on Aging’s site.

2. You can support your community. Because the people selling at farmer’s markets live in the area, your money goes back into the local economy.

3. Many accept SNAP and WIC benefits. Many farmers markets accept these to make sure families can afford buying healthy, fresh food. Learn more about which ones take SNAP and WIC, or check out this list of all the farmer’s markets that take Illinois Link Benefits.

Certain markets, like the new Champaign Farmers’ Market downtown, have special deals for SNAP users, so it’s always good to check with the info booth first. At their market, they will double up to $20 of benefits per person while funds last when you bring your Link card to the market booth!

4. It has lots of healthy foods. Fresh fruits and veggies are full of nutrients and antioxidants and are a big part of the MyPlate guidelines from the USDA that help you eat healthier.

5. The farmers often have suggestions. They can tell you what foods are the best right now, help you find new things to try, and tell you the best ways to cook what you buy.

6. It’s a good family activity. It’s a great way to get your kids involved and learning about healthy eating, and it’s so nice to shop outside on a beautiful day.

Find farmers markets near you.

Up Next:

Need tips on shopping at farmers markets? We can help you do it right!

Cooking Together for a Healthy Diet at Any Age

A Healthy Diet as You Age

National Nutrition Month has been going on all March long. And while it would be great for everyone to commit to a healthy diet,  it’s harder for some people to bounce back from bad food choices than it is for others.

For older adults, those sugary and salty snacks can add up to a problem quickly. But you can help certain problems that get worse with age by making smart food decisions when you’re young and even when you’re older.

Eating better can make a huge difference in your overall health. Studies show a healthy diet can reduce the risk of osteoporosis, high blood pressure, heart disease, and certain cancers.

Here are some things for older adults and their caregivers to keep in mind.

1. Choose healthy foods that help you eat a balanced diet, and always drink plenty of water. Foods and drinks with empty calories, like soda and chips, don’t do you any favors nutritionally and don’t help you feel full.

2. Your food choices affect your entire body. Choosing whole grains, fiber, fruits, and vegetables and drinking plenty of water can help you stay regular and keep good digestive health.

3. If you have a specific medical condition, make sure you check with your doctor about foods you should include, like foods high in calcium, or things you should avoid, like those high in salt.

4. Don’t let your teeth or dentures stand in the way of eating meat, fruits, or vegetables. Visit your dentist to check for problems or adjust the fit of your dentures so mealtime is easier.

5. If you feel like food is getting stuck in your throat, you may not have enough spit in your mouth. Drink plenty of liquids when you eat for help swallowing, and talk to your doctor to see if a condition or medicine you’re on could be causing your dry mouth.

6. Make cooking and eating fun. Invite friends for a potluck where you each make and bring one part of the meal. Try cooking a new recipe with a friend or stage a cook-off to see who makes the better dish. Plan a date with your loved one where you cook a meal together. Have dinner at a senior center, community center, or religious organization for an affordable way to meet new people.

Follow us on Facebook and on Pinterest to find healthy recipes.