Tag Archives: acceptance

Mother Knows Best

Long View: Mother Knows Best

Picture it, jumping back and forth on furniture, hearing a mother say, “Stop jumping. You are going to get hurt.” Or hearing a mother say, “Finish your vegetables, and drink your milk.”

Or as a teenager, arriving home past curfew, while Mom waits awake with a worried look on her face. And then she says, “One day you will understand, when you have your own kids. You will feel worried when you don’t know where they are.”

Now that I am a mother, I know exactly what she meant.

“Mother knows best,” is a phrase I think we all heard while growing up. And isn’t that the truth at any age?

Mothers are often who we turn to for big and small things going on in our lives; they’re the ones we celebrate with and mourn with. They share stories of the past to help us learn more about the future. And when I go to my mom’s, or when I would visit my grandmother, I don’t know what it is, but I can sleep there better than anywhere else. I guess it is because it’s where I feel safe and loved for all that I am, no matter what. That’s my experience at least.

My mom has become one of my best friends in my adult life, someone who will always advocate for me, lift me up, and be there in happiness and tears. And I do the same for her.

Now, I have an 18-year-old daughter, and we have developed a similar relationship. Just like they say, time sure does fly, but motherhood has been one of the most rewarding parts of my life. I always want my daughter to feel safe, loved, and supported. I hope pain is limited in her life, but I always want her to know I will be there for her, no matter what the age, if she needs me.

She graduates from high school this month, and that will be an emotional day. When she turned 18 in February this year, she said, “Well, it is my last birthday.” I didn’t quite understand why she was phrasing it that way.

In her mind, it was the reality of becoming an adult, and she felt like that was the last time someone would focus on her special day because she was an “adult” now. Not sure why as adults we think we are less important to focus on, but I will celebrate her and my mother anytime.

May is the month when people recognize and celebrate their mother. Everyone does things a little differently. Maybe they go out and buy flowers, get the perfect card, go out for lunch, and pamper them for the day. Mothers deserve celebrating, and maybe you have something special planned too.

Outside of this special, dedicated time in May, it is also important to appreciate and spend time with them throughout the year to let them know how much we appreciate all of the advice and guidance we receive and to continue to learn more of those “mother knows best” moments!

Terra Mullins leads the community outreach team at Health Alliance. She is a wife, a mother, and has two really cute Mal-Shi pups! She loves nature and learning new things.

Learning for Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month. Whether you’re pregnant, familiar with Down syndrome, or learning more, get the facts.

NDSS’s webinar series covers many topics in relation to Down syndrome, from health and education to family life.

Embracing Differences

 

Find a Buddy Walk to promote acceptance and inclusion of those with Down syndrome.

Save the Date to Help Down Syndrome

 

Hear stories of Down syndrome firsthand.

Sharing Stories from Down Syndrome

 

Use DS-Connect, the NIH’s Down syndrome registry to contribute and connect to ongoing research.

Fueling the Future

 

Check out Down Right Awesome, the podcast about living with Down syndrome.

Living with Down Syndrome

 

Find ways to advocate for Down syndrome awareness.

Making a Difference for Down Syndrome

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Make a Difference for Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness

Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month

July is National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month. We had more info each day on these issues and how you can help!

Each year, about 4,400 infants in the U.S. are born with a cleft lip or palate. Donate now.

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Clefts are a hole or notch in the lip, palate, or ridge, and they can happen together. They vary in seriousness and treatments. Learn more from the CDC.

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The National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) helps learn about prevention for cleft lips and palates. They have found that diabetes, smoking, thyroid disease, and certain medications during pregnancy can increase chances.

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Books like Wonder can help teach your kids about facial differences, which helps with awareness and acceptance of cleft lips and palates.

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Some who adopt get kids dealing with cleft lips or palates, but this Q&A can help you learn more about the issues.

A young baby with a cleft palate looking over the shoulder of her mother

 

Learn how you can make a difference and do cleft lip and palate community outreach with Pathfinder.

Join a family-to-family connection from cleftAdvocate to get help with questions anytime.

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Autism Awareness

National Autism Awareness Month

April is National Autism Awareness Month. So, how do we get from simple awareness to true acceptance? Start by learning more about autism and The Autism NOW National Autism Resource & Information Center.

 

Last year the CDC estimated that 1 in 68 kids in the U.S. have autism, making it clear that it affects millions of Americans. It is affecting your community, so help make a better world for autism.

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Autism is a developmental disability that, in varying amounts, affects social communication, restrictive and repetitive behaviors, interests, or activities. Learn more.

What do people with autism wish you knew? Read their personal stories on The Autism NOW Blog during Autism Awareness Month.

Learning About Autism

 

Catching problems like autism in children early makes a huge difference. Early screening and milestone checklists can help.

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It’s important to break down myths and misinformation to understand and accept what autism really means. Learn about the full range of disorders.

Growing insurance coverage and knowledge about autism helps those that have it, but we can all do more. Get involved.

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