National Rice Month

National Rice Month Recipes

It’s National Rice Month, and rice is a great way to get grains in any meal. Because of its popularity around the world, it’s also a great way to try new flavors. Mix more rice into your meals with these healthy rice recipes.

First up is One-Pot Spinach Rice, a healthy and hearty side dish for your next dinner.

One Pot Spinach Rice

 

If you need a fast, all-in-one dinner, look no further than Cajun Chicken & Rice.

Cajun Chicken & Rice

 

Drop the takeout menu and try this Clean-Eating Chicken Fried Rice instead.

Clean Eating Chicken Fried Rice

 

Bring the flavors of Mexican food home with Cilantro-Lime Black Bean Shrimp and Rice.

Cilantro-Lime Black Bean Shrimp and Rice
Image and Recipe via Julia’s Album

 

Herbed Wild Rice with Mushrooms tastes so good you’ll abandon boxed wild rice.


Image and Recipe via Fork in the Kitchen

 

These 24 Healthy Rice Bowls will help you choose what’s for dinner this fall.

Rice Bowls
Article via Buzzfeed and Image via Sandra’s Easy Cooking

 

Trying to cut back on grains? Make Cauliflower Rice to sneak in extra veggies.

Cauliflower Rice
Image and Recipe via Gimme Delicious

Healthy Chicken Recipes

Healthy Chicken Recipes for National Chicken Month

It’s National Chicken Month, and chicken doesn’t have to mean boring dinners with these healthy chicken recipes for light family meals.

First up are quick and easy Grilled Chicken Avocado Wraps for you to pack for lunch.

Grilled chicken avocado wrap

 

Taco Tuesday is the perfect time to make these Skinny Baja Chicken Tacos.

Skinny Baja Chicken Tacos
Image and Recipe via The Live Fit Girls

 

Don’t skimp on comfort food this fall with this recipe for Healthy Chicken Pot Pie.

Healthy Pot Pie
Image and Recipe via Well Plated

 

Save on the expensive meal out by making these Baked Chicken Fajita Roll-Ups instead.

Baked Chicken Fajita Roll-Ups

 

No takeout needed with this simple Skinny Slow Cooker Kung Pao Chicken.

Skinny Slow Cooker Kung Pao Chicken

 

Dinner and cleanup are quick and easy with Honey Dijon Chicken and Veggies Foil Packets.

Honey Dijon Chicken and Veggies Foil Packets:
Image and Recipe via Eat Well

 

You’ll be ready for fall soup season with this Southwest Chicken Detox Soup.

Southwest Chicken Detox Soup

SaveSave
Depression Awareness

Depression Awareness for Suicide Prevention Month

It’s National Suicide Prevention Month, and someone with depression dies of suicide every 13 minutes, over 41,000 people per year. We spent the week raising depression awareness.

Depression affects more than 18 million, or 1 in 10, people and takes an economic toll of over $100 billion in the U.S. each year.

The Cost of Depression

 

Severe depression can be one of the most debilitating conditions, rated in the same category as terminal cancer.

Depression's Reach

 

Fewer than half of the people in the world with depression get treatment because of lack of resources or the stigma of mental health issues.

Depression's Toll

 

Depression can be caused by social, psychological, and biological factors, and your physical health can make a difference. Exercise can help.

Exercise to Feel Better

 

There are treatments for moderate and severe depression, from therapy to medicine.

Depression Treatment

 

You can also adjust your lifestyle to improve depression. Avoid stress, alcohol, and drugs, maintain a healthy diet, and get plenty of sleep and exercise.

Lifestyle Changes and Depression

SaveSave
PCOS Awareness Month

PCOS Awareness Month

It’s Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS Awareness Month. PCOS is an endocrine disorder that affects 1 in 10 women, more than 7 million total.

Learning About PCOS

 

More women suffer from PCOS than the number of people diagnosed with breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus combined.

Unity in the Face of PCOS

 

With PCOS, many women develop cysts because of a hormonal imbalance. Insulin may also be linked to it.

Insulin Levels

 

PCOS Symptoms can include infertility, abnormal menstrual cycles, weight gain, pain, and more.

PCOS Symptoms

 

Your doctor can perform an exam or tests to check for signs and symptoms of PCOS. Ask about them at your next well-woman visit.

You and Your Well-Woman Visit

 

If you suffer from PCOS, you’re more likely to have serious health problems like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and sleep apnea.

More Serious Health Risks that Go with PCOS

 

There isn’t a cure for PCOS, but your doctor can help you treat it and its symptoms. You can also donate time or money.

PCOS Treatment and Support

SaveSave
Better Breakfast Month

Better Breakfast Month

In honor of Better Breakfast Month, we have healthy and delicious breakfast recipes for you each day this week.

Take a morning off from bread with Avocado, Egg, and Spinach Sweet Potato Toasts.

Avocado, Egg, and Spinach Sweet Potato Toasts
Image and Recipe via Iowa Girl Eats

 

Need an easy meal to grab in a hurry? Overnight Oatmeal 6 Ways is the way to go.

Overnight Oatmeal 6 Ways
Image and Recipe via Fannetastic Food

 

Baked Sausage, Spinach, and Egg Breakfast Taquitos also make a good brinner.

Baked Sausage, Spinach and Egg Breakfast Taquitos

 

These Quick Raspberry Applesauce Paleo Breakfast Bars will feel like dessert.

Quick Raspberry Applesauce Paleo Breakfast Bars
Image and Recipe via Paleo Gluten Free Eats

 

Turkey & Egg Breakfast Casserole will be a hit with the family Saturday morning.

Turkey & Egg Breakfast Casserole
Image and Recipe via Aimee Mars

 

These Flourless Peanut Butter Waffles are the perfect gluten-free treat.

Flourless Peanut Butter Waffles {Protein Rich}

 

Whip up these Sweet Potato Hash Breakfast Bowls and get in a serving of veggies.

Sweet Potato Hash Breakfast Bowls
Image and Recipe via Kim’s Cravings

Save
Waiting for Fall

Vantage Point: Waiting for Fall and Enjoying the Present

It’s finally September, which means back-to-school and a return to the routines of a new school year. I often find myself mildly enjoying September. The weather starts to cool, and fair time is right around the corner. But I often want to rush through September to get to October, which is the month I really love.

I love the fall, and the entire month of October is literally my favorite time of year. I love the crispness in the air. I love the changing of the colors in nature. I love going to Thompson’s Farm in Naches with my family, getting a fresh, hot pumpkin donut, and maybe even taking a hay ride. I love carving pumpkins with my kids. I also love the flavors of fall.

I pretty much love anything and everything fall.

But as I was reflecting to write this piece, a thought came to my mind: enjoy where you’re at. This caused me to pause for a few minutes and to really reflect on what this means. I want to rush to the fall, but maybe I need to enjoy the end of summer.

Maybe I need to take my kids to the local fruit stand and get the end-of-summer harvest of peaches, apples, or watermelon before fall starts in the Valley. Maybe I need to plan a summer picnic or outdoor activity before it gets too cold outside to really be comfortable in the evening. Maybe we need to take one last camping trip or go fishing. Maybe I need to actually enjoy the season or time that I’m in instead of wanting it to be another one.

I think so often we are rushing or waiting for the next event or milestone (or season for me), that we don’t enjoy where we’re at right now. We are just rushing, trying to get through, and I don’t know if that’s really the best thing to do.

For me, I need to slow down and enjoy the month at hand, and not wish I were in another month, time, or place. Now, I’m actually excited that September is here, that summer is still here, and that I can still take in all the goodness of the summer’s ending with the ones that I love.

And I can still be excited for the coming of fall.

Breck Obermeyer is a community liaison with Health Alliance Northwest, serving Yakima County. She is a homegrown girl from Naches and has a great husband who can fix anything and 2 kids who are her world. When not attending community events or providing Medicare education throughout the Valley, she can be found indulging in her hobbies of homesteading, pioneer cooking, and learning new survival techniques. She also has a strong love for all things Halloween.

Busy Defining You?

Long View: Busy, Busy, Busy

One of the advantages of having an e-column is that once in a while, I get to rant. This is such an occasion.

Seems every time I ask someone how they are doing they answer, “Busy, you?”

I think it’s a given that we are all swept up in the relentless pace of modern-day life, but I wonder if that is what is defining us, the busyness, instead of what we are busy with?

I hear things like, “I am slammed at work,” or “swamped,” or my current favorite, “underwater.” None of these seem to refer to a joyful work-life balance, but I understand we shouldn’t judge others.

I asked some friends out to dinner, and they started listing all the times they were not available and all the fabulous activities they had planned. Yes, I admit it was a jam-packed schedule, but their monologue didn’t address my original question. We eventually agreed to an early-evening supper 2 months out. It was a very enjoyable occasion; however, I don’t think I needed to know all the details it took to get there.

I offered an acquaintance, a friend of a friend, some hostas from my yard. (I was separating them, and she had a new house in need of plants.) She agreed to a tentative time to come by and get them, but somehow, it just didn’t work out for her. The next attempt, she texted me a proposed time and canceled it 15 minutes later. On our final attempt, I got a text saying something had come up at work and she would be about an hour late. I replied, “Frankly my dear,” and haven’t heard from her since.

The next time someone asks me how I am doing, I am going to relate one joyous thing in my life and ask them to do the same. Maybe that will start the conversation on the right foot. I will come up with some better suggestions when I have a spare moment

By the way, I intentionally made this column shorter than usual, so that I could give you back a minute of your life. Please put it to good use.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.

UA-45064957-1