Quinoa Month

Healthy Quinoa Month Recipes

It’s Quinoa Month, so it’s the perfect time to make the most of the protein-packed grain with these healthy quinoa recipes.

Whip up this 5-Minute Savory Breakfast Quinoa for a hearty, filling breakfast.

5-minute Savory Breakfast Quinoa


Skip takeout tonight with these tasty Chicken Quinoa Burrito Bowls.

Chicken Quinoa Burrito Bowls
Image and Recipe via Gimme Some Oven


Sweet Potato Quinoa Bites are a perfect snack on-the-go, especially for your little ones.

Healthy Sweet Potato Quinoa Bites


Bake a batch of Skinny Pumpkin Quinoa Muffins and skip the expensive coffee-shop pastry.

Skinny Pumpkin Quinoa Muffins


This warm Chicken Quinoa Soup is a great pick-me-up for sick or rainy days.

Chicken Quinoa Soup


Skip the candy bars at the store and treat yourself with Quinoa Chocolate Crunch Bars.

Quinoa Chocolate Crunch Bars
Image and Recipe via Rachl Mansfield


Add some protein to your pizza night with this Ultimate Quinoa Pizza Crust.

Recipe Remake: The Ultimate Quinoa Pizza Crust

Brain Injury Awareness Month

Brain Injury Awareness Month

It’s Brain Injury Awareness Month, and every 9 seconds, someone sustains a brain injury. Learn more about brain injuries.

Brain Injuries


Acquired brain injuries (ABIs) are ones that aren’t hereditary or from a degenerative disease. These can be caused by infection, electric shocks, nearly drowning, stroke, seizures, tumors, substance abuse, and overdose. 

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are from a trauma to the brain, and every day, 137 people die of TBI-related injuries. At least 5.3 million Americans live with a TBI-related disability.

Traumatic Brain Injuries


Opioid addictions and overdoses can cause permanent brain injuries and disabilities.

Opioids and Brain Injuries


Strokes are brain injuries that can permanently alter your life. Learn more about preventing strokes.

Preventing Strokes


Concussions are brain injuries, and without treatment, they can cause serious problems. But a better way to detect them might be on the way.

Concussions' Effects on the Brain


More than 13,000 service members and veterans are diagnosed with TBIs, and knowing the signs is key to getting help.

Military and Vet Brain Injuries

Healthy Chocolate Recipes

Healthy Chocolate Recipes

It’s American Chocolate Week, and you don’t have to break your healthy diet to enjoy it with these healthy chocolate recipes.

Whip up a simple and indulgent Greek Yogurt Chocolate Mousse that will impress anyone.

Greek Yogurt Chocolate Mousse


These tasty No-Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Crunch Bars are the perfect kid-friendly treat.

Healthy No Bake Chocolate Peanut Butter Crunch Bars (Vegan, Gluten Free)


This Chocolate Banana Frozen Yogurt Bark is a cool, refreshing treat when you’re craving ice cream.

Chocolate Banana Frozen Yogurt Bark


Chocolate Quinoa Cake is a great replacement for your sugary boxed-cake mix.

Chocolate Quinoa Cake


Treat yourself with these beautiful Raw Chocolate Raspberry Slices.

Raw Chocolate Raspberry Slices
Image and Recipe via Frankie’s Feast


Skip the candy bar with these healthy and easy Chocolate Coconut Balls.

Healthy Chocolate Coconut Balls


Skinny Double Chocolate Banana Muffins are a great way to start your morning if you have a sweet tooth.

Skinny Double Chocolate Banana Muffins

Healthy Radicchio Recipes

Healthy Radicchio Recipes

This week, we’re helping you get ready for spring by featuring in-season, healthy radicchio recipes.

First up is an easy Radicchio, Avocado, Chicken, Grape, and Hazelnut Salad.

Raddichio, Avocado, Chicken, Grape and Hazelnut Salad with Balsamic Honey Vinaigrette


­Whip up these simple Quesadillas with Apple, Radicchio & Pomegranate for a healthy app.

Fall Quesadillas with Apple, Radicchio & Pomegranate


Grilled Radicchio, Summer Squashes, and Scallions go great with fish or chicken for a healthy dinner.

Grilled Radicchio, Summer Squashes, and Scallions
Image and Recipe via Martha Stewart


These Tuna and White Bean Radicchio Lettuce Wraps make the perfect light lunch.

Tuna and White Bean Radicchio Lettuce Wraps
Image and Recipe via Brook Lark


Fig, Green Bean, and Radicchio Salad with Hazelnuts is a surprisingly delicious combination.

Fig, Green Bean, and Radicchio Salad with Hazelnuts
Image and Recipe via Gourmande in the Kitchen


Radicchio, Pear, Gorgonzola, Pomegranate, and Walnut Salad is a tasty lunch or pre-dinner salad.

Radicchio, Pear, Gorgonzola, Pomegranate, and Walnut Salad


This beautiful Pumpkin Ricotta Gnocchi with Pancetta and Seared Radicchio will impress guests.

Pumpkin Ricotta Gnocchi with Pancetta and Seared Radicchio
Image and Recipe via Yummly

National Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Awareness Month

National Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Awareness Month

It’s National Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Awareness Month, and in recent years, chronic fatigue syndrome has been recognized as a serious chronic disease.

Wondering what it’s like to live with chronic fatigue syndrome? This article dives into it.

Living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome


Signs and symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome include fatigue and extreme exhaustion, loss of memory or concentration, headaches, restless sleep, unexplained joint or muscle pain, and enlarged lymph nodes.

Signs of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome


People who have chronic fatigue syndrome can be hypersensitive to even normal exercise and activity and can experience extreme exhaustion more than 24 hours after activity.

Sensitivity to Exercise and Activity


Some people’s chronic fatigue syndrome may be triggered by things like viral infections, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances.

Viral Infection Trigger


It is more likely to affect you if you are in your 40s or 50s, are a woman, of have difficulty managing stress. Learn more.

Your Risk of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome


Chronic Fatigue Syndrome can increase or contribute to depression, work absences, social isolation, or restrictions on your lifestyle.

Complications of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Trends Coming Full Circle

Vantage Point: Coming Full Circle

I don’t know why, but lately, everywhere I look, I see so many things becoming popular that are from “back in the day.” Yes, we all know as each day goes by, we’re getting just a bit older. We don’t feel it, but as I look back 3 or 6 months at a time, I notice subtle changes.

When I was growing up, my parents still owned a telephone that had a long swirly cord attached, and you had to sit in the kitchen to be on the phone. As time went on, I remember going to friends’ houses after school, and they had wireless home phones that they could take into their rooms.

I would go home and beg my parents to please get a wireless home phone. It took a lot of begging, but we finally got one. Now, I see that fewer and fewer people have home phones at all, and I personally miss them.

Then came the camera. As a child, my mom would purchase film for her camera, we’d take pictures, and once the film was full, we’d take it to the store and fill out an envelope with our information to pick up our pictures in a couple of days.

Then, digital cameras with an SM card came around. You could retake pictures as many times as you wanted and then choose which ones you wanted to print.

Now, most of us don’t even own cameras since we have cameras on our phones. Most people don’t even print pictures nowadays, they just save them to hard drives, social media, and the cloud. I’ve personally lost so many pictures when my phone has suddenly stopped working.

My younger sister recently had a birthday, and I asked for a list of things she might want. At the top of her list was an Instax mini camera. I had no idea what that was, so I looked it up online.

Of course, it’s the new version of Polaroid camera. Apparently, they’re the cool thing to have with all the young teens. I found it humorous that everything had come full circle. First, we had physical versions of our pictures, then we loved the digital versions, and now we want the physical versions again.

Everything really does come full circle, fashion, music, and even electronics. I myself am really considering getting a Polaroid camera so I can be part of the cool kids again.

Jessica Arroyo, born and raised in the Wenatchee Valley, is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. During her time off, she enjoys spending time with her husband and infant son.

Busting Stereotypes Across Generations

Long View: What Exactly Is a Whippersnapper?

I once told a youthful and entrepreneurial friend of mine that I was having trouble viewing his website. He responded, “You need to update your browser. A lot of older people use the one you have on your computer.”

I’ve found it best to pause before responding to comments like these. After counting to 5, I responded, “That’s called ageism-prejudice or discrimination against a particular age group.” I refrained from calling him a whippersnapper, although it was on the tip of my tongue. While he seemed to get my point of view, the incident started me thinking.

How often do we all make snap judgments based on stereotypes? More often than we care to admit. I rarely associate youth and wisdom, but that said, I know mature people who have managed to avoid accumulating any wisdom or insight during their lives. I guess we all associate youth with vitality, but we all know teens who are confirmed couch potatoes or spend inordinate amounts of time glued to their smart phones.

Here at Health Alliance, we work with some folks who require more support and information. Others want to cut to the chase and get on with their lives. Impatience doesn’t seem to be a trait associated with any particular age, does it?

It seems to be human nature to hold stereotypes dear, even subconsciously. We all have experiences that color our perceptions, so what’s the problem with making assumptions based on our own biases?

Prejudice stops us from fully experiencing the people in our lives. It’s easy to drop people into simple, broad categories and focus on more important things, like our own busy lives. The loss occurs when we dismiss people without getting to know them as individuals. Having preconceived ideas about any group saves time, but it diminishes our chance to get to really appreciate someone as a fellow human being instead of a representative of their subset.

I’m making a concerted effort to be more sensitive with the words I use, and I am trying to be aware when I make a snap judgment. I know some of you feel you are prejudice-free. Ask yourselves if you are truly non-biased or just kidding yourself.

Actually, I meant to say, ask yourselves if you are being naive and lacking in experience.

Patrick Harness is a community liaison with a long history of experience in health insurance. If you ask him to pick a color, he always chooses orange, and he is known for his inability to parallel park.