Older Driver Safety Awareness Week

Older Driver Safety Awareness Week

It’s Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, and the ability to drive safely can be affected by changes in our physical, emotional, and cognitive health. Although these changes are part of normal aging, they can affect each individual at different rates.

Just as one plans for retirement, it’s important to plan for your transportation needs.

Planning for Future Transportation

 

December is the perfect time to have a conversation with loved ones as you come together for the holidays.

Talking to Family About Driving As They Age

 

When an older driver decides it’s time for a check-up, useful driving fitness education tools can help identify challenges and help them adjust.

Evaluate Your Ability to Drive As You Age

 

Driving intervention plans, drawn up between a client and therapist, can help older individuals drive safely for as long as possible.

When someone needs to adjust to keep driving or can no longer drive, family and friends can help with resources for independent transportation in the community.

Planning for a Future Without Driving

 

Exploring alternative types of transportation can help older adults stay independent. Options can include community networks, public transit, and ride sharing apps.

Resources to Stay Independent

 

Vision problems and certain medications can also cause issues driving early. Talk to your doctor to get help.

Health Issues and Driving As You Age

Buckwheat Month

Buckwheat Month

It’s Buckwheat Month, and this ingredient can help you go gluten-free and take the place of ingredients like oatmeal and quinoa. Plus, it’s delicious! Give it a try with this week’s healthy buckwheat recipes.

This easy Overnight Coconut Buckwheat Porridge is perfect for busy families.

Overnight Coconut Buckwheat Porridge {VIDEO}

 

This Warm Buckwheat and Beetroot Salad is a beautiful and hearty side dish for any meal.

Warm buckwheat and beetroot salad

 

Whip up these Crispy Buckwheat Breakfast Flatbreads for this weekend’s brunch.

Crispy Buckwheat Breakfast Flatbreads
Image and Recipe via Gather and Feast

 

Buckwheat Crepes are a light take on this kid-friendly favorite.

Buckwheat Crepes {Gluten-Free}

 

Cut out the flour with these Buckwheat Chocolate Chip Cookies this holiday season.

Buckwheat Chocolate Chip Cookies

Buckwheat Chocolate Chip Cookies (Gluten Free)

 

Go gluten-free and skip the takeout with this easy and delicious Buckwheat Pizza.

Gluten-Free Buckwheat Pizza

 

These Apple, Almond, and Buckwheat Muffins will be a hit with the family for breakfasts on the go.

Image and Recipe via Green Kitchen Stories

Prepare for Holiday Travel

Vantage Point: The Gift of Preparedness

The holidays provide the perfect time for people to be out and about, traveling to various destinations.

You think about if you have all the gifts and various outfits with you in case different events arise. Did your family members pack what they need, and did you pack your toothbrush? Those are all very important things to focus on, but have you thought about what you might need if something during your travels goes awry?

Do you have what you need to make it through an unplanned emergency? Yes, I know it’s not fun to think about things that could go wrong. But if you do, it just might help or even be lifesaving, depending on the circumstance. Just one tip to remember when you’re playing the mental game of what could go wrong that I like to remember: not fear, just prepare. Don’t live in fear. Just try to have the basics covered.

Let’s imagine that you’re taking a holiday trip by car to visit family. Let’s say that they are pretty far away, a few hours, and the weather hasn’t been the greatest lately, but today it’s OK. They are forecasting snow closer to where your family lives, but you think you’ll beat the snow by an hour or so. But what if you don’t?

What if the car breaks down, and it throws your timeline off, and you do encounter that snowstorm? And what if you didn’t break down, but the storm is worse than predicted, and you can’t get to your destination? Do you have the supplies you’d need to get help or wait out the storm?

I know it’s literally impossible to plan for all the potential issues, but thinking of it in categories can help you plan the best items to have for you and your family. Think shelter, food, and water as a basic start. Your vehicle can hopefully be your shelter, so what about the other variables?

  • Stay hydrated and fed. 

    Because you’re traveling, you might pass through an area where there aren’t any stores close by, and now the family is hungry, and it doesn’t look like you’ll be moving toward your destination anytime soon. The first item you should think about having with you is water. It’s always smart to have water, from a few jugs or bottles to a whole case. You can never go wrong having extra handy. Next you should think about food. These can range from snack items to protein bars and high-calorie survival bars.

     
  • Keep warm. 

    Because you’re traveling in the winter in our imagined scenario, it’s probably going to be cold in your area. If something happens where you lose the heat in your car, do you have supplies to keep everyone warm? You might think about having warm blankets, hand warmer packets, layers of clothes to put on, and a thermos of warm soup, water, cocoa, or coffee. (And this isn’t the be-all-end-all list, but just some ideas to get you thinking!)

If you’re thinking that those are great starter ideas, but you might need more robust supplies, there are plenty of things out there to help. Winter travel kits at the local box stores make it easy to be prepared in a variety of situations. You can also search for more winter car travel safety tips online.

The possibilities are endless, and you really can tailor your needs to your family and their well-being. Happy travels!

Breck Obermeyer is a community liaison with Health Alliance Northwest, serving Yakima County. She is a small-town girl from Naches and has a great husband who can fix anything and 2 kids who are her world.

Family Time for the Holidays

Covered Bridge: If Only Time Stood Still

As a child with a birthday in December (of course shortly followed by Christmas), I can say I always wished the first part of December away. I was so excited about all the festivities to come that I merely wanted the days to pass until the real excitement began.

Even though I share a birthday with my twin sister and some of our presents consisted of sharing, I wanted nothing more than to see what gifts we might receive for our birthday. Fast forward 10 days, and all we wanted to see were the gifts we would receive for Christmas, hoping not to have to share those.

That’s usually the way kids work, right?

Now, as an adult, my daughter’s birthday is 2 days from mine, which means I care less about what I get and more about what we get to do for her. My husband and I rarely get gifts for one another. We find much more joy in giving to others than receiving ourselves.

These days, we look forward to making cakes for birthdays and favorite meals for our kids. We look forward to family coming to town to visit and trying our best to get thoughtful gifts for them that we hope they’ll enjoy.

We enjoy the extra company and chaos that ensues with it. We spend more time sitting around the table chatting with family and less time worrying about the cleanup of a meal we spent most of the day preparing. After all, it will be there tomorrow. Our family may not be.

It’s also important to remember that while some of us think of joy and family during the holiday season, others feel isolation and anxiety, and the shorter, darker days and cold weather don’t help. We often forget about those who may be living alone. I encourage you this holiday season to take an extra moment to make time for the ones who may need it more than you know.

During the holidays, which is oftentimes the only time we get to be with distant family, take the extra time to not worry about what can be put off until tomorrow. Spend it talking, communicating, and interacting. We rush through life as children to get to the next exciting moment, but what if the most exciting moments now are the ones shared over a meal and simple conversations?

Happy Holidays!

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

National Pomegranate Month

National Pomegranate Month

It’s National Pomegranate Month, and you can work the in-season fruit into both sweet and savory recipes for a fresh burst of flavor. These healthy pomegranate recipes can help you get started.

First up is a beautiful dish for holiday breakfast, Cinnamon Spice and Pomegranate Oatmeal.

Cinnamon Spice and Pomegranate Oatmeal

 

Baked Balsamic Goat Cheese Stuffed Pomegranate Chicken is an easy weeknight dinner for the family.

Baked Balsamic Goat Cheese Stuffed Pomegranate Chicken

 

Lighten up everyone’s favorite with this Caramelized Butternut, Crispy Kale, and Fontina Pizza with pomegranate salsa.

Caramelized Butternut, Crispy Kale, and Fontina Pizza

Caramelized Butternut, Crispy Kale + Fontina Pizza

 

This beautiful Apple-Pomegranate Breakfast Crumble would be perfect for a Christmas morning surprise.

Apple-Pomegranate Breakfast Crumble (Gluten and Grain Free!)

 

Whip up a romantic date night with Beef Filets with Pomegranate-Pinot Sauce.

Fall Farro Salad with Halloumi & Pomegranates
Image and Recipe via My Fitness Pal

 

This Fall Farro Salad with Halloumi & Pomegranates is a celebration of colorful in-season veggies.

Fall Farro Salad w/ Halloumi & Pomegranates

 

Go vegetarian for dinner tonight with Baked Pumpkin with Rocket, Feta, and Pomegranate.

Baked Pumpkin with Rocket, Feta, and Pomegranate
Image and Recipe via Adeline and Lumiere

National Marrow Awareness Month

National Marrow Awareness Month

November is National Marrow Awareness Month, and it’s the perfect time to celebrate the doctors, researchers, and donors helping fight back against marrow-based diseases. Learn more about which diseases can be treated by bone marrow transplants.

Bone marrow is the tissue inside your bones that helps make blood cells. White blood cells help fight infections, red blood cells help carry oxygen throughout your body, and platelets help to control bleeding.

Bone Marrow and Blood Cells

 

A bone marrow transplant replaces unhealthy marrow with healthy marrow from a donor. Learn more about the most common types of transplants.

Types of Bone Marrow Transplants

 

Bone marrow transplants can treat blood cancers like leukemia or lymphoma, bone marrow diseases like anemia, or other immune system or genetic disease like sickle cell disease. Learn more about how marrow donation works.

What BMT Treat

 

Are you a patient facing a bone marrow transplant or a caregiver of someone who is? Learn more about the process, from the first steps to life after a transplant.

Patients and Caregivers and BMT

 

Becoming a donor is an important decision. Learn more about the process and the support you can get as a donor.

Becoming a Bone Marrow Donor

 

Even if you can’t be a donor, you can still join the National Marrow Donor Program’s community to help.

Prematurity Awareness Month

Prematurity Awareness Month

It’s Prematurity Awareness Month, and a premature birth takes place more than 3 weeks before the expected due date.

Learn the signs and symptoms that you might be going into labor early.

Signs of Premature Labor

 

Some of the greatest risk factors for premature birth are previous premature births, a pregnancy with multiple babies, smoking or drug use, and going less than 6 months between pregnancies.

Risk Factors for Giving Birth Too Early

 

Premature babies can deal with mild symptoms or more serious complications. Some signs include a small size, sharper features from a lack of stored baby fat, low body temp, and trouble breathing or feeding.

Signs of Prematurity

 

Premature babies will likely need longer hospital stays. Your doctor and a specialized team help care for the baby and can explain what’s happening every step of the way.

Hospital Stays for Premature Labor

 

Short-term complications from premature birth can include issues with their lungs, heart, brain, blood, metabolism, and immune system.

Long-term complications from premature birth can include cerebral palsy, chronic health issues, and problems with their learning, vision, hearing, and teeth.

Complications from Premature Birth

 

If you’re at risk of a premature birth, your doctor might have you take progesterone supplements or have a surgical procedure on your cervix. They might also have you avoid vigorous activity or go on bed rest for the end of your pregnancy.

Preventing Premature Labor

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