Heart-Healthy Recipes

Heart-Healthy Recipes

For American Heart Month, these heart-healthy recipes will help you lighten up your diet at any age.

Skip the drive-thru with flavorful Egg White, Spinach, and Feta Breakfast Sandwiches.

Egg White, Spinach, and Feta Breakfast Sandwiches
Image and Recipe via From Playdates to Parties

 

Skip the appetizer with this Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Chicken for dinner.

Spinach Artichoke Stuffed Chicken

 

This Blackberry Glazed Salmon is so beautiful that no one will guess you’re trying to eat healthy.

Blackberry Glazed Salmon

 

Lighten up the classic with this Creamy Avocado Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad for lunch.

Creamy Avocado Greek Yogurt Chicken Salad

 

Do snacking with a sweet tooth right with these Apple Cinnamon Cookie Energy Bites.

Apple Cinnamon Cookie Energy Bites

 

Skip the temptation of chips and margaritas and make these Baked Chicken Chimichangas at home instead.

Baked Chicken ChimichangasImage and Recipe via The Girl Who Ate Everything

 

Curl up on the couch on cold nights with this Heart-Healthy Turkey Chili.

Heart Healthy Turkey Chili

Heart Health in Young Adults

Heart Health in Young Adults

It’s American Heart Month, and this year’s focus is on preventing heart disease and promoting heart health in young adults. More young adults are dying of heart disease, and their rates of risk factors are rising.

When you’re a young adult, the best way to protect yourself from heart disease is with smart lifestyle choices, like eating a heart-healthy diet.

Heart Healthy Lifestyle Choices

 

Find time to be active, from yoga class to lunchtime walks. Aim for 2.5 hours of physical activity per week.

Teens who use e-cigarettes are more likely to smoke tobacco products. Avoid tobacco altogether, or kick it now to protect your heart.

Avoiding Tobacco and Addiction

 

You’re never too young to know your numbers. High blood pressure and cholesterol can affect you younger than you might realize. Learn to take your own blood pressure.

Learning About Blood Pressure

 

Stick to a medication routine to manage and control conditions like high blood pressure that put your heart at risk.

A Medication Routine

 

Reduce stress in your life to protect your heart. Even high levels of noise, like living by railroad tracks, may be bad for your stress level and your heart.

Stress, Noise, and Your Heart

 

Stay in the know and see your doctors annually. Even now, we’re still learning more about what can cause heart attacks in healthy people.

Staying On Top of Your Heart Health

Healthy Valentine's Date Recipes

Healthy Valentine’s Date Recipes

This week, get ready for a romantic date night in with delicious, showstopping, healthy Valentine’s date recipes.

You don’t have to have meat to indulge with this beautiful Ratatouille.

Ratatouille
Image and Recipe via Pure Wow

 

These easy Braised Short Ribs will melt in your mouth.

Braised Short Ribs

 

Your loved one doesn’t need to worry about this Cheater’s Skillet Paella. It only helps you cheat at cooking paella.

Cheater’s Skillet Paella
Image and Recipe via Pure Wow

 

Beautiful Chicken & Quinoa can help you lighten up date night eating.

Healthy Valentine’s Day Dinners For Two!

 

You don’t have to go out to get great ramen with this simple Rotisserie Chicken Ramen.

Rotisserie Chicken Ramen
Image and Recipe via Pure Wow

 

Skip the buttery dinner out with these Shrimp Scampi Zoodles for Two.

Shrimp Scampi Zoodles for Two

 

Make this Cornish Game Hen to blow your loved one away this Valentine’s Day.

Cornish Game Hen
Image and Recipe via Bakers Royale

Children's Mental Health Week

Children’s Mental Health Week

It’s Children’s Mental Health Week. Sometimes kids are just being kids, and sometimes they can have real mental health concerns, and getting help can improve their quality of life.

Self-esteem is an important part of kids’ long-term mental health. These are some simple ways to boost your child’s self-esteem.

Boosting Your Children's Self-Esteem

 

If children worry excessively to the point that they’re restless and have trouble concentrating or sleeping and it interferes in their day-to-day life, they may have an anxiety disorder.

Worrying Too Much As a Child

 

Children might have ADHD if they frequently lose things, have trouble paying attention, are forgetful, and have trouble holding still.

ADHD Signs and Symptoms

 

If your child swings from highs that include excessive energy, risky behavior, and a feeling that nothing can go wrong to lows that include constant sadness and low energy, they may have bipolar disorder.

Bipolar Disorder in Children

 

Depression includes feelings of sadness and hopelessness that last longer and go above normal feelings of sadness. If your child has it, there are treatments to help.

Fighting Depression as a Child

 

Your child might have obsessive compulsive disorder if they’re overly afraid of germs and things being disorderly or if they have to double-check things over and over.

OCD in Kids

 

If your child is having delusions, it can be very scary for you and for them. Learn more.

Go Red for Heart Health

Long View: You Can’t Beat a Healthy Heart or 6 More Weeks of Winter

Just when you think the holidays are over and the thrill of the new year has finally tapered down, here comes February — Groundhog Day, Super Bowl Sunday, Mardis Gras, Valentine’s Day, and Presidents Day. February is a multi-themed, food-filled month of celebration.

We anticipate the shadow reveal of Punxsutawney Phil, we break out the football-shaped cheese ball to root for our team, we plan our menu of anything and everything on Fat Tuesday, and if that isn’t enough, we love to eat chocolates on the day of love. Then when it’s all over (and after a slight weight gain), we hit the mall for some comfy stretch wear with Presidents Day sale bargains!

But wait, how about doing something this month to celebrate our health and focus on our heart? If we can take advice from a small woodchuck about the weather, we surely can take advice from the American Heart Association about our health!

February is American Heart Month, and part of that is National Wear Red Day. For those of you who know me, my wardrobe pretty much consists of drab colors and neutrals, but this year, I broke out my red floral scarf for a splash of color as a symbol of support!

The American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute encourage all of us to take action against this killer disease. Studies show that 80% of cardiac and stroke events may be preventable with education and action.

Find time to talk to your family and get everyone on board with heart health. Encourage healthy eating habits by making healthier versions of your favorite food. Choose foods and recipes low in sodium and with no added sugar or trans fats. When you shop, buy colorful fruits and vegetables, which are all powerhouses when it comes to nutrition, and stay away from dairy and meat products that are high in fat.

Fiber is important in your diet, and you can find fiber not only in fruits and vegetables, but also in beans, nuts, and whole grain. Take the time to read the nutrition labels on items, and check out the sodium content. (A general rule is, if anything has more than 250 mg of sodium, you may want to search for something with less.)

Physical activity can also help you stay heart healthy. It’s not only what you put into your body, it’s also what you put out. Exercise helps to improve heart health, and it can even help reverse certain heart disease risk factors. Our heart becomes stronger from exercise, which helps it pump more blood through the body and work at maximum level without strain.

Aerobic activities at least 3 to 4 times a week are the best. Choose walking, swimming, or biking, and allow for a good 5 minutes of stretching beforehand to warm up your muscles and a cool down period after you’re through. And of course, always check with your doctor before starting any new physical routine.

So this February, maybe forego indulging in lavish holiday food choices (remember that New Year’s resolution?) and celebrate in a new way. Go out and buy something red to wear to celebrate heart health AND 6 more weeks of winter, or will it be an early spring? Better check with Punxsutawney Phil before you go!

Mervet Adams is a community liaison with Health Alliance. She loves her grandson, family, nature, and fashion.

World Cancer Day,

Covered Bridge: One Day, Awareness for All

It’s likely that we’ve all known or come across at least one individual who has touched our lives with their empowering story. What do I mean by empowering story, you ask?

I mean the story of a family member, friend, fellow co-worker, or acquaintance that leaves a chill in your bones when you listen to how hard they fought. The kind of story that leaves a lasting impression on how you view life. One that alters who you are, even just a little. And one that proves, when faced with hardship, struggles, and even death, these individuals gave it all they have. Their fight can come from something greater than any of us can imagine, a love of life so great that fighting to beat it is the only choice they have.

You see, February 4 was World Cancer Day, which is meant to raise awareness of cancer and to encourage its prevention, detection, and treatment. World Cancer Day was founded by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) to support the goals of the World Cancer Declaration. We regularly hear about different months dedicated to raising awareness about certain types of cancer, but World Cancer Day is awareness for all cancers.

Here at Reid Health Alliance Medicare, we highly encourage you to get preventive care, keep yourself healthy and educated about cancer, and have the tools to keep the ones you love in the know.

Here are a few tips to protect yourself from cancer from WorldCancerDay.org:

  • Quit smoking. Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of cancer. Quitting at any age can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life.
  • Maintain a healthy weight and make physical activity part of your everyday life. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of bowel, breast, uterine, ovarian, pancreatic, esophagus, kidney, liver, advanced prostate, and gallbladder cancers. Specific changes to your diet, like limiting red or processed meat, can also make a difference.
  • Reduce your alcohol consumption. Limiting alcohol can help decrease the risk of mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, bowel, liver and breast cancer.
  • Protect your skin. Reducing exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun and other sources, like tanning beds, can help reduce the risk of many skin cancers.

Morgan Gunder is a community and broker liaison for Reid Health Alliance. Born in the South and raised in the Midwest, she is a wife and mother with a passion for traveling, learning, and technology.

Healthy BBQ Recipes

Healthy BBQ Recipes for Meat Week

It’s Meat Week, which means people all over the country are enjoying their favorite barbecue, and we’re going to help you enjoy it too with healthy BBQ recipes.

First up is an easy, sweet Pineapple BBQ Chicken Meal Prep to prepare for the week.

Pineapple BBQ Chicken Meal Prep

 

Lighten up your favorite Super Bowl dish with Veggie Meatballs with Cranberry Barbecue Sauce.

eggie Meatballs with Cranberry Barbecue Sauce
Image and Recipe via Catching Seeds

 

Enjoy light and delicious Korean BBQ Chicken at home.

Korean BBQ Chicken
Image and Recipe via Rasa Malaysia

 

If you love BBQ chicken, lighten it up for a meatless day with Vegan BBQ Chicken Sandwiches.

Vegan BBQ Chicken Sandwiches
Image and Recipe via Vegan in the Freezer

 

Enjoy your favorite flavors with BBQ Chicken & Roasted Sweet Potato Bowls.

BBQ Chicken & Roasted Sweet Potato Bowls
Image and Recipe via The Creative Bite

 

Skip the red meat with this showstopping Asian BBQ Salmon.

Asian BBQ Salmon
Image and Recipe via Carl’s Bad Cravings

 

Lighten up your kids’ favorite pizza with this Sweet Potato Crust Pizza with BBQ Chicken.

Sweet Potato Crust Pizza with BBQ Chicken
Image and Recipe via The Soccer Mom Blog

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