Tag Archives: stress

Reduce Traveling Stress

My Healthy Journey – Traveling Stress

The end of April and beginning of May might be the craziest month-long stretch I’ve ever planned for myself. I will be battling traveling stress each week with almost no downtime in between.

First, I spent a weekend with loved ones around Indy, going to the zoo and shopping. Then, my mom, sister-in-law, and I went on a big weekend trip to New York City to see a Broadway show. The next weekend, I’m headed to Chicago to visit some old friends. The 2 weekends after that, I’m driving home for events, and then the weekend after that, I’m off to Seattle.

No matter what, traveling is stressful, so to get through it, I’m trying to plan ahead, stay on top of things, make the healthiest decisions I can on the go, and enjoy the moments of fun that are the whole point of traveling in the first place.

Planning Ahead to Avoid Traveling Stress

While tickets and such have been booked ahead of time, the planning never ends there.

Clean Before

First, I spring-cleaned my apartment like crazy so that it could survive the coming month without looking like a wasteland.

Spring Cleaning List

I pulled tons of great tips to make this list from the helpful resources we shared in our Spring Cleaning for National Cleaning Week post, like using rubber gloves to wipe dog hair off my furniture, freshening up my garbage disposal, and more.

Organize, Organize, Organize

I’ve been making a list of all the things I need to do before each trip, so I don’t do something silly and forgetful, like making myself late by forgetting to put gas in my car before driving to the airport.

And this list doesn’t just include the things I need to pack but also the things I need to do around the house and the errands I need to run first.

NYC To Do List

This helps me stay on track and not forget all the little things that have to be pulled together at the last minute.

Pack Early

I try to pack as much as I can ahead. The key to-do’s I can mark off in advance:

  • Buy or organize travel liquids if I’m flying.
  • Check the weather forecast.
  • Plan versatile outfits, like things that can mix and match and fit the weather and planned activities, including shoes because I get blisters easily.
  • Organize or switch to a purse better for travel.
  • Never forget essentials, like headphones, a book, sunscreen, bandaids, gas in the car, and meds.
  • Pack snacks.
  • Plan driving times and routes.
  • Charge devices.

Packing Ahead

Then, at the last minute, I can just add in the things I’m still using, like my makeup bag, toothbrush, and phone charger, and avoid all that last-minute packing stress.

Planning for Work

Another important key to planning ahead is making sure work is ready for me to be completely unavailable.

Usually that just means talking to my co-workers in advance and making sure anything that takes place on the weekends, like social media for the next week, is done early.

One of the easiest ways to ruin your vacation is to have to drop everything for work, so make sure you’ve talked to your co-workers and set boundaries for when you’ll be available.

Then, stick to those boundaries because vacations are an important part of avoiding burnout. If you’re only going to check email once a day, stick to that and do it at a time when it won’t ruin your day.

Staying on Top of Things to Avoid Traveling Stress

No matter how much planning you do, it can all fall apart while you’re there if you focused on the wrong thing.

Planning Activities

I like to make plans for each day with loose free time around them. You never want to have to be too many places in one day, so one meal with reservations and one event or activity that requires tickets in advance per day is probably plenty. You can munch or discover something new when you’re actually hungry the rest of the time, which can help you avoid overeating on a trip. And you’ll have more time to focus on something you love instead of rushing off to your next activity.

I also like to have extra time planned in so that if I’m exhausted, I can take a nap, shower after a hot outdoor activity, or simply enjoy downtime by watching a movie or grabbing an appetizer with my loved ones.

Get Your Bearings

Another key can be knowing your location and how to get around. I’ve lived in New York and Chicago, so I know my way around the neighborhoods and how the subways work, and pulling up a location on my phone is more than enough for me to find my way in either place.

However, I’ve never been to Seattle, so looking at maps and familiarizing myself with what’s where will be a much more important part of planning that trip so I don’t end up lost when I get there.

Identify what you need to focus on in preparation for each trip for a smooth journey to avoid hiccups in the moment.

Start the Day Off Right

Each morning of your trip, it’s a good idea to review your plans with everyone. Not only will it put you all on the same page, but it will help you remember which important tickets, confirmation numbers, or reservation details you need to bring along that day for your planned activities.

Making Healthy Choices to Avoid Traveling Stress

Traveling stress skyrockets for me when I feel guilty about it, so I’m trying to make healthy choices wherever I go.

A few weeks ago, I bought a Ringly ring. Ringly is a fitness tracker that syncs to your phone but looks like jewelry. I’d been wanting a tracker for a while, and the design of these adorable pieces made me finally get on board.

You charge it in a ring box and manage it from an app on your phone, and no one would ever know from looking at it that it’s a tracker.

Ringly Box Ringly Ring

Because of this new tracker, I can see how much walking I’m doing each weekend. The weekend in Indy, I walked 9.2 miles. And in NYC, we planned in time to walk the High Line and the bottom half of Central Park. We ended up walking 25.5 miles total!

I also try to choose healthier food choices most of the time without sacrificing the experience.

Enjoying the Moment to Avoid Traveling Stress

Finally, the stress-busting key for me is enjoying the fun parts of traveling. Those moments have to outweigh the stress, or it’s not worth it!

In NYC, we:

  • Ate at Bobby Flay’s Gato
  • Saw the new show Amélie
  • Spent a day at Chelsea Market
  • Walked the High Line
  • Had a ball at Waitress, including the perfect-serving-size, tiny Key Lime and Marshmallow Pies at intermission (And they raised $20,000 dollars in a little auction at the end of the show for charity!)
  • Indulged in the special Easter brunch menu at Tom Colicchio’s Craft
  • Explored Central Park

With more crazy weekends ahead of me, I hope my planning helps me stay sane!

Tips for Your Travels

If you need more tips to make it through your next trip and traveling stress, these can help:

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Aging with Your Pets

Long View: Aging With Our Pets

My grandparents had a Chihuahua that lived to be 20 years old. Suzy had her own knitted sweaters to wear when she went outside. Every night, Grandma cooked and cut up liver in tiny, bite-sized pieces for Suzy’s dinner.

I’m not sure what the life expectancy and living arrangements for most dogs were in the 1950s and 1960s, but I would wager that Suzy’s life was particularly plush for that era. When I came along in 1968, my parents gave me the middle name of Sue. I often wondered if this was a happy coincidence or a tribute to that beloved Chihuahua.

Today, I have a yellow Labrador retriever puppy named Harvey. Grandpa’s name was Harvey. Touché.

Americans love their pets. Take a stroll through your local big-box pet supplies chain, and the number of things a person can buy for their animals will amaze you. Strollers, raincoats, probiotics, gluten-free and vegan dog food, and even memory foam mattresses. Within just a few miles of my house, Harvey can go to a doggy day camp, swim at an indoor pool just for pooches, and later have his hair and nails done at the pet spa.

Your pet pampers you in different ways. Owning a pet lowers stress, reduces blood pressure, and raises mental sharpness. A study from the University of Missouri-Columbia showed that petting a dog for 15 minutes releases the feel-good hormones serotonin, prolactin, and oxytocin, while also lowering the stress hormone cortisol.

Pets can open up a lonely world and get you out of bed in the morning. Walking a dog (or a cat, if you are particularly brave and the cat is extremely cooperative) is good exercise. Those of us with an empty nest find a new sense of purpose. And nurturing a beloved animal gives us unconditional love in return.

An older person with a pet companion can be a heartwarming love match. I reached out to Stacey Teager, from the Quad City Animal Welfare Center, for some advice for those who are looking to add a pet to their home in later years.

  • Make sure your pet gets regular checkups and immunizations. Have your animal spayed or neutered.
  • Never give your pet “people” medications. Always consult a veterinarian before medicating your pet.
  • Have a plan in place with your family or close friends for caring for your pet should you become sick and need to be hospitalized or stay in a nursing facility.
  • Match your pet with your physical capabilities. My 50-pound Labrador retriever puppy can drag my mother down the sidewalk. This is dangerous for both her and the dog. A quieter, smaller animal is a better choice for her to walk around the neighborhood.
  • Despite my grandmother’s loving intentions, don’t feed your pet table scraps or human food. Animals can get overweight and unhealthy with just a few added ounces. If you like to bake, there are lots of recipes for animal treats that use ingredients found in your pantry.

Lora Felger is a community and broker liaison at Health Alliance. She is the mother of 2 terrific boys, a world traveler, and a major Iowa State Cyclones fan.

Act Happy Week

Act Happy Week

Next week is Act Happy Week, and happiness can affect your health more than you realize.

Live for the Day

 

Believe it or not, the effects of positive thinking can actually improve your health and happiness.

Positive Thinking Grows

 

Positive thinking lowers depression and distress and is tied to handling stress well.

Positive thinking is also tied to longer life spans, greater resistance to the common cold, and better heart health.

Active and Happy

 

Positive and optimistic thinkers also tend to live healthier lifestyles, with more physical activity and a healthier diet.

Act Happy for a Healthier Lifestyle

 

Practice makes perfect. Try putting things in positive terms. “I’ve never done it before” becomes “I can learn something new.”

Setting Hopeful Goals

 

Humor can help. Give yourself permission to laugh, especially at difficult times, which can help lower your stress.

Laughter as the Best Medicine

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Finding Passion this Hobby Month

National Hobby Month

January is National Hobby Month, and you may not realize how much hobbies can help your health and reduce stress.

Fishing for Your Health

 

No idea how to start finding a hobby as an adult? We can help.

Finding Hobbies As an Adult

 

How does our blogger bust boredom with hobbies in the winter? Steal her ideas.

Hobbies to Bust Boredom

 

If you need help getting started, Discover a Hobby can help you find the perfect fit.

Still at a loss? Try one of these ideas if you still need a new hobby.

Hobbies for All

 

January is the perfect time to turn your healthy New Year’s resolution into your new hobby.

Resolutions to Hobbies

 

Check in with our blogger as she prioritizes self-care through hobbies and projects.

Hobbies for Self-Care

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National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month. Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses.

National Hospice & Palliative Care Month

 

Hospice care is special care for people who are terminally ill. It includes medical and physical care and help with social, emotional, and spiritual needs.

Hospice and palliative care empower people to live as fully as possible, surrounded and supported by family and loved ones, despite serious illnesses.

Know Your Options

 

Each year, more than 1.65 million Americans living with serious illnesses get care from the nation’s hospice programs.

 

Each year, hospice saves Medicare more than $2 billion through care and comfort for patients and families.

Protecting Yourself for the Future

 

Hospice care provides support for family and caregivers and can help take some of the stress of care off of them.

Preparing for the Future

 

It’s important to know about your options and prepare to share your wishes before a healthcare crisis with advance care planning.

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Meditation and Relaxation

My Healthy Journey: Find Time for Meditation

Sometimes, it feels like life is 5 steps ahead of you. At this time of year, I always feel it the strongest, as we launch this year’s websites and plans for 2017 and the holidays rush toward me.

The last few months have been a whirlwind of work, a move to Indiana, going remote with this job, a family trip to Phoenix, and huge holiday plans (like a trip to Philly) on the horizon.

I take comfort in knowing that I’m not the only one who sometimes feels like life is barreling ahead of me. My brother and sister-in-law bought an old house around this time last year and have completely redone it, which has taken them all year. I don’t know how they’ve had the energy to do it all.

Finding Calm

When things feel like they’re spiraling out of control (which, I mean, usually feels like it’s all the time), I just have to remind myself to take moments for myself.

Sometimes, it means buying myself a latte.  Sometimes, it means training for a 5K I’ll never run. (My chiropractor recommends I don’t run outside because inclines are bad for my back.) Sometimes, it means building a terrarium (which I finally did), watching a movie I’ve been wanting to see, or just taking 5 minutes to cuddle my dog.

My Terrarrium
Can you spot my hidden fox?

And sometimes, it means just finding a way to clear my mind. Cooking has always been one of the best ways for me to do that, and I’ve been trying out recipes from the Skinnytaste Cookbook.

Skinnytaste Cookbook

Skinnytaste's Chicken ParmMy favorite so far has been an amazing chicken parm made with whole wheat bread crumbs and homemade tomato sauce, and it’s baked instead of fried.

And recently, I’ve found those adult coloring books are a great way for me to clear my mind. They’re the perfect balance of intricate and easy.

New Healthy Habits – Meditation

I’ve been thinking about picking up something like meditation to get that same coloring book clarity. Our online wellness tool, Rally, has a mission to meditate for 20 minutes a day that can help you give meditation a try.

And these tips can help you get started with meditation. There are also lots of podcasts for you to listen to while you meditate, or this guide goes through some of the different approaches you can try to start meditating.

In the meantime, find whatever peace you can in the midst of the craziness.

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Protect Against Dryness for National Healthy Skin Month

National Healthy Skin Month

November is National Healthy Skin Month. These handy tips can help you protect your skin:

Healthy Skin Tips

 

The healthier your diet, the healthier your skin. Check out our blog or Pinterest for healthy recipes.

Eating Smart for You Skin

 

Next summer, prevent your skin problems.

Summer Skin

 

Stress and Your SkinStress is a huge contributor to skin problems, so take time to relax.

 

 

 

These tips can help:

Chasing Health: Writing, Resting, and Winning Winter

 

Do you know how to prevent skin cancer? We have tips to help:

Skin Cancer Awareness Month

 

Prevent dry skin this winter with these dermatologist-approved tips.

Don’t forget your lips this winter. Use lip balm with SPF to protect them.

Protect Your Kiss

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