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Your Preventive Care

Your Yearly Preventive Care and Physical

Getting your yearly physical, where you can get covered preventive care and screenings, helps you be your healthiest. It’s important that you not only know what’s recommended for your age and what you need to stay up to date, but also that you get to the doctor for this each year!

What Happens at Your Physical

Each year, you should schedule a physical with your doctor to focus on your health and wellness. At the appointment, you can:

  • Keep track of your health habits and history
  • Get a physical exam
  • Stay up-to-date with preventive care
  • Get education and counseling and set health goals

Health Habits & History

One of the first things that happens at your annual appointment is a nurse or your doctor will ask you to answer some questions about your health and family history, including questions about:

  • Your medical history
  • Your family history
  • Your sexual health and partners
  • Your eating and exercise habits
  • Your use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs
  • Your mental health history, including depression
  • Your relationships and safety

This info can help you in the future. From getting diagnosed to being protected and helping you in an emergency, this information can help save your life.

Physical Exam

At your yearly physical, you can expect your doctors or nurses to:

  • Measure your height and weight
  • Calculate your body mass index (BMI) to check if you’re at a healthy weight
  • Take your blood pressure and temperature

From there, your doctor may give you your regular preventive care screenings and shots or refer you to a specialist for certain screenings, counseling, or care.

Preventive Care

As an adult, certain preventive care and screenings are covered for you, depending on timing and what your doctor recommends.

Immunizations (Shots)

Doses, recommended timing, and need for certain immunizations can vary based on your case:

  • Diphtheria
  • Flu shot
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Herpes Zoster
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Measles
  • Meningococcal
  • Mumps
  • Pertussis
  • Pneumococcal
  • Rubella
  • Tetanus
  • Varicella (Chickenpox)
Condition Screenings & Care
  • Aspirin use – To prevent heart disease for adults of a certain ages
  • Cholesterol screening – For adults of certain ages or at higher risk
  • Blood pressure screening
  • Type 2 diabetes screening – For adults with high blood pressure
  • Colorectal cancer screening – For adults over 50
  • Depression screening
Weight Management
  • Obesity screening and counseling
  • Diet counseling – For adults at higher risk for chronic disease
Alcohol & Tobacco Use
  • Alcohol misuse screening and counseling
  • Tobacco use screening – For all adults and cessation interventions for tobacco users
  • Lung cancer screening – For adults 55 to 80 at high risk for lung cancer because they’re heavy smokers or have quit in the past 15 years
  •  Abdominal aortic aneurysm – A one-time screening for men of certain ages who have ever smoked
Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Screenings
  • Sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention counseling  – For adults at higher risk
  • Hepatitis B screening – For people at high risk, including people from countries with 2% or more Hepatitis B prevalence, and American-born people not vaccinated as infants and with at least one parent born in a region with 8% or more Hepatitis B prevalence
  • Hepatitis C screening – For adults at increased risk and once for everyone born from 1945 to 1965
  • HIV screening – For everyone ages 15 to 65 and other ages at increased risk
  •  Syphilis screening – For adults at higher risk

Women also have some additional covered screenings and benefits. Get more details about this specific preventive care while learning about your well-woman visits.

And learn more about what preventive care the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends you get and when.

Education, Counseling & Health Goals

Your doctor can help you manage your conditions or diseases and prevent future problems by talking to you about your life and health each year.

Your doctor might have valuable handouts, websites, advice, and information to help you take care of yourself or might want to refer you to a specialist who can help you further.

Your doctor is also the perfect person to help you set goals to maintain or improve your health. From quitting smoking and knowing how to self-check for cancer to changing your diet and exercise for your weight, cholesterol, or blood pressure, your doctor can help you plan to be your healthiest.

Prepare for Your Visit

Preparing yourself with questions to ask and answers to your doctor’s questions can help you make the most of your visit.

Know Your Family History

Your family’s history of health and wellness is an important part of your own health record. Histories of illness and disease can help doctor’s look out for issues that run in families and more.

This family health history tool can help you track your family’s health, so that you’re always organized to talk to your doctor. Not sure about your family history? Filling this out is the perfect time to talk to family members for firsthand details.

Talk to Your Doctor

Prepare for your appointment by knowing any questions or issues you want to talk about ahead of time. Some things you might want to ask:

  • What immunizations or shots you need
  • Your diet and eating healthy food
  • Advice for exercise and getting active
  • Mental health concerns, like depression and anxiety
  • Specific issues you might be having, like sore joints, back pain, migraines, and more

Know What’s Covered

Learn more about your covered immunizations. And log in to Your Health Alliance or search by your member number to see what preventive care your plan covers.

You can use our general preventive care guidelines and prescription drugs or our Medicare preventive care guidelines to get an idea of what our plans cover.

If you’re not sure what’s covered and what you’ll need a preauthorization for, you can check your coverage and preauthorization lists at Your Health Alliance.

Now that you’re ready to go to your annual physical, log in to Your Health Alliance if you need to set a Primary Care Provider (PCP) and find a covered doctor, or start searching for doctors in our network.

Plan Ahead for Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month

Age Out Loud!May is Older Americans Month, and it’s time to age out loud by striving for wellness, knowing your rights, staying engaged, and exploring new things.

 

 

Older Americans Month

 

Embracing a healthy diet as you age is an important part of striving for wellness.

A Healthy Diet as You Age

 

Protect yourself by preventing falls year-round with our ultimate guide to fall prevention.

Your Ultimate Guide to Fall Prevention

 

Managing your diseases takes work, but we can help with important info and resources.

Disease Resources

 

Thinking about downsizing as you get older? Long View has advice to help.

Long View: The Key to Downsizing

 

Know your rights and plan for future healthcare decisions now with advance directives.

Stay engaged and get the most out of your doctor’s appointments by preparing ahead.

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctor’s Appointment

 

If you want to explore new things, finding a new hobby could help you get started.

National Hobby Month

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Preparing for the New Year

Healthy Meal Planning

As you get ready to take on a new year, we can help you start meal planning for success.

Use these tips to get started.

So You Want to Start Meal Planning

 

Interested in trying a vegan diet? This meal plan can help you make a smart effort.

Weekly Vegan Meal Plan #1 (Shopping List Included): Zero waste and less effort

 

Learn to mix and match for the perfect meal.

 

Prepare to shop for a smooth trip to the store.

Before You Shop

 

These tips can help you make smart and healthy choices at the grocery store.

Grocery Shop Like a Pro

 

Looking for healthy meals you can prep in advance? These freezer meals are perfect for you.

24 Healthy Freezer-Friendly Dinner Recipes

 

Not much of a cook? Try some of these No-Cook Meal Prep ideas.

No-Cook Meal Prep for the 1,800–2,100 Calorie Level

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National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month. Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses.

National Hospice & Palliative Care Month

 

Hospice care is special care for people who are terminally ill. It includes medical and physical care and help with social, emotional, and spiritual needs.

Hospice and palliative care empower people to live as fully as possible, surrounded and supported by family and loved ones, despite serious illnesses.

Know Your Options

 

Each year, more than 1.65 million Americans living with serious illnesses get care from the nation’s hospice programs.

 

Each year, hospice saves Medicare more than $2 billion through care and comfort for patients and families.

Protecting Yourself for the Future

 

Hospice care provides support for family and caregivers and can help take some of the stress of care off of them.

Preparing for the Future

 

It’s important to know about your options and prepare to share your wishes before a healthcare crisis with advance care planning.

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Diabetes Resources and Treatment

National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and now’s the time to raise awareness and protect yourself.

86 million Americans are at risk of developing diabetes. Learn how you can protect yourself starting at home.

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This month is also Diabetic Eye Disease Month. ‪‎Diabetes‬ is the #1 cause of new blindness in adults. Learn more.

Eye Exams and Diabetes

 

Understanding your diabetes can be kind of like football, from U.S. News and World Report.

Visit our diabetes section to learn more about taking care of you or your family’s disease.

Diabetes is more common and more serious than many Americans realize. Protect yourself now.

Diabetes by the Numbers

 

You can help stop type 2 diabetes in its tracks with smart shopping and eating. Find resources from the American Diabetes Association to get started.

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Exercise is an important part of taking care of and preventing diabetes. Programs like this can help, from NPR.

Interested in learning more about diabetes from our different partners’ health experts? Check out our events page for presentations and videos.

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Fresh Fiddlehead Ferns at Your Farmers Market

Making the Most of a Farmers Market

There are lots of reasons to get out to your local farmers market, but going to a farmers market for the first time is very different than going to the supermarket. We can help make sure it goes smoothly with these tips from a farmers market veteran:

1. Prepare.

  • Illinois has a Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program that gives you a free booklet of checks that you can use at local markets. Check it out on the Illinois Department on Aging’s site for details and participating counties and markets .
  • Many vendors only take cash (and some take SNAP and WIC benefits). Some booths only take small bills, 20s and smaller.
  • Many vendors don’t offer bags, so it’s a good idea to bring a few cloth ones you can use.
  • Most markets don’t allow dogs, so leave them at home.
  • Have an idea of what is in stock at that time of year, so you know what to expect. Use this map to find out what’s in season where you live.

2. Check the info booth first. If your market has an info booth, check there before you start shopping. The people working can let you know if there are any special things going on that day, like cooking demos.

Certain markets, like the new Champaign Farmers’ Market downtown, have special deals for SNAP users, so it’s always good to check with the info booth. At their market, they will double up to $20 of benefits per person while funds last when you bring your Link card to the market booth!

3. Go early or go late. If you go early, you will have first pick of the freshest and largest selection. If you go late, some farmers will offer discounts to clear out their stock before heading home.

4. Take a lap. Unless you know your market really well, don’t just buy the first things you see. By walking a lap through the market first, you can get the lay of the land, compare prices and selection, and taste samples.

5. Talk to the farmers. The farmers can answer questions about how the food was grown and harvested, talk about why their produce is or is not organic, offer recipes, give info about something you’ve never tasted, or recommend their favorites.

6. Be mindful. It’s considered rude to squeeze stone fruits, like peaches, plums, or tomatoes, because it can bruise them. And it’s considered rude to open husks of corn before buying them, which can actually make them less sweet. Also, look for whole produce, meaning veggies like carrots and beets with their green tops still whole. These will stay fresh longer, and you can make things like pesto sauces with the greens.

7. Take a risk. Sometimes you find things that are new, different, or even strange at the farmer’s market. This is the perfect opportunity to try something new because the farmers can usually give you advice on how best to use it.

8. Bring a friend or the family. Grocery shopping, unlike the farmers market, can feel like a chore. Take people with you to talk and walk with outside, and the farmer’s market instantly becomes a more fun activity. And you can always save money and split certain produce.

9. Keep it simple. When you’re cooking your food at home, go for simple recipes. Because you bought such fresh produce, you should let it shine. Put fresh wild strawberries over a salad or in a breakfast parfait instead of baking them into a cake. If you’re worried you won’t be able to use all of something you bought you can always freeze it and use the rest later. Use this guide from the FDA to make sure you’re storing and washing produce correctly.

10. Find the right market. Many areas have more than one farmers market within driving distance. If you can, test them all. Large farmer’s markets have a lot of energy, selection, and sometimes even dining options, but smaller markets often have good deals. Find the one that works best for you.

Find farmer’s markets near you. Learn more about which ones take SNAP and WIC, or check out this list of all the farmer’s markets that take Illinois Link Benefits.

Up Next:

Do you really understand what you’re getting when you buy organic? We break it down in Organic 101.

And make sure you’re cleaning your fresh fruits and veggies the right way to keep your family safe.

Become a Blood Donor

National Blood Donor Month 2015

January is National Blood Donor Month, and we gave you more info about blood and how you can help save lives each day this week.

Are you interested in hosting a blood drive in your community? The American Red Cross can help you save lives.

Did you know that donating 1 pint of blood can save up to 3 lives? Do you know your blood type and who you can donate to? Learn more with the American Red Cross.

Pint

 

Not sure if you’re allowed to donate blood, or how much you can give? The American Red Cross can tell you!

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If you’re new to donating blood, The American Red Cross can help you get ready to save lives.

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If you can’t donate, you can still kick off your new year right by volunteering at a blood drive near you. Find opportunities.

Volunteer

 

This Red Cross video can walk you through the blood donation process step-by-step, so you know exactly what to expect.

 

Now that you’ve given blood, what happens to it? Find out what’s next.

STUDIO INGRID 201 250414

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