Tag Archives: poison

Animal Poison Prevention

Animal Poison Prevention

It’s National Animal Poison Prevention Week, and there are ways for you to protect your pets, especially in your home.

Not all food you eat is safe for your pets. Don’t give your pets chocolate, onion, garlic, coffee, avocados, raisins or grapes.

Feeding Pets Smart

 

You should also never give your pets fruit pits, like peach pits, or any bones, which can splinter and damage their digestive system.

Smart Snacking for Pets

 

Store your pets’ medications somewhere separate from your own so you never accidentally give them human meds.

Pet Medication Storage

 

Make sure your meds are stored in a secure place so your pets can never accidentally get into them.

Protecting Your Pets from Your Meds

 

Always keep cleaning supplies in a secure place that your pets can’t get to. These chemicals can be very harmful for them.

Cleaning and Your Pets

 

Make sure your pets can’t get to batteries, potpourri, yarn, rubber bands, or floss in your home, all of which can be harmful.

Also protect pets from insecticides, antifreeze, plant food and fertilizer outside. And know which plants are poisonous to them.

Protecting Pets from Poisoning

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Flaming Hot

Hot Enough

There’s a good reason to make sure you’re always cooking your meat to the right temps: foodborne illness.

Foodborne illness, or food poisoning, is when you eat or drink foods that are contaminated by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or even poisonous chemicals. There are more than 250 different foodborne illnesses. The top 5 are the most dangerous.

Myths vs. Facts

Myth: Food poisoning is rare and not that serious.

Facts:

Foodborne Illness Stats
Statistics via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Myth: I will know if I have food poisoning.

Facts: Food poisoning is often blamed on things like “a stomach bug,” but it can have many symptoms.

The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, and diarrhea. You could experience all of these or just one. It really depends on what caused it.

Myth: This happened because my food was dirty.

Facts: There are lots of reasons this can happen.

Fresh fruit and veggies can be contaminated if they’re washed in tainted water or touched by unwashed hands or sick people who help process the food.

Some healthy animals have certain kinds of bacteria to help their digestion. These can come in contact with the meat you eat during processing. Salmonella, one of the most dangerous foodborne illnesses, can infect a hen so that its eggs are infected from the start.

Leaving raw food to thaw out of the fridge or leaving cooked food out for too long, like at a potluck or BBQ, can let bacteria grow.

Food coming into contact during cooking with raw meats or dirty cutting boards and knives can spread the bacteria to things that were clean!

What Should I Do?

First, make sure you’re washing your fruits and veggies after you buy them and storing things safely.

Heat can kill bacteria, so always make sure you cook your food to the right temperature. You can do this by using a food thermometer.

Place the thermometer in the thickest part of the food, but it shouldn’t be touching bone or fat. Check the temp toward the end of cooking but before you think it will be done. And make sure to clean it well with hot, soapy water between each use.

Use these handy guides to cook and grill your food to safe temperatures:

Meat & Poultry Temperature Guide
Image via Food Network

 

Grill Master Guide
Image via Visual News

Up Next:

Wondering how long your food is actually good for? We can help make sense of all those dates!

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Call the Poison Control Center

National Poison Prevention Week

Last week was also National Poison Prevention Week, so this week we gave you tips and info on protecting your family.

The most important thing is to keep the Poison Control Center number handy. Call 1-800-222-1222 if the poisoned person is still awake and alert. Otherwise, call 911.

Prescription drug overdose is one of the main causes of poisoning. Make sure you store them and other toxic products, like household cleaners securely and out-of-reach of children.

Poisoning by Prescription

 

Always make sure you read all the labels and warnings, especially when giving medicine to kids, pregnant women, and the elderly.

Labels and Poison Prevention

 

If you don’t need it, make sure you dispose of old and expired drugs properly. Follow these federal guidelines.

Getting Rid of Extra Prescription Drugs

 

Always keep household cleaners and products in their original containers. Never store them or beauty products in any type of food container.

Storing Cleaners Safely

 

Never mix household cleaners. For example, mixing bleach and ammonia makes a poison gas.

Using Cleaners Safely

 

Always wear protective coverings, like gloves, long sleeves, and pants when using household cleaners and lawn chemicals.

Protect Yourself While Cleaning

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