Tag Archives: eggs

Healthy Summer Party Tips

Healthy Summer Party Tips

4th of July get-togethers and summer parties are in full swing, so we have healthy summer party tips to make your party a success.

First up, brush up on outdoor food safety.

Safe Summer Infographic

 

Know the 4 steps to food safety for your 4th of July party.

4 Steps to Food Safety

 

Transport food in coolers whenever possible, and never leave any food with mayo, dairy, meat, or eggs out for longer than 2 hours.

Food Sitting Out

 

When grilling, cook beef and pork to 145 degrees, ground meat to 160 degrees, and chicken or turkey to 165 degrees.

Temperature Guide

 

Avoid cross-contamination by keeping dishes and utensils that touched raw meat away from other ingredients and cooked meat.

Tick season is supposed to be bad this year, so set up a bug spray station and use torches or candles to repel bugs.

18 Cookout Hacks to Take Summer Entertaining to the Next Level

 

Sunscreen is an important part of all outdoor get-togethers. Have it on hand and help prevent skin cancer.

Skin Cancer Awareness Month

 

And check out our healthy summer party recipes that are perfect for your next party or get-together and, without mayo or dairy, will keep longer outside.

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Eggs for National Egg Month

National Egg Month Recipes

May is National Egg Month, so we’re helping you whip them into easy meals for your family.

First up is a delicious Turkey and Egg Breakfast Casserole, perfect for brunch.

Turkey & Egg Breakfast Casserole

 

These Mexican Stuffed Sweet Potatoes with Eggs make an easy and tasty meal.

Mexican Stuffed Sweet Potatoes With Eggs

 

Spinach and Mushroom Egg White Frittata is a light take on the classic.

 

Quinoa Fried “Rice” is a protein-filled version of your takeout favorite.

Quinoa Fried “Rice”

 

Make simple Eggs Baked in Portobello Mushrooms for an easy breakfast.

Eggs Baked in Portobello Mushrooms

 

Skip the pastry with this lighter Crustless Spinach, Onion, and Feta Quiche.

Crustless Spinach, Onion and Feta Quiche

 

Whip up this Sweet Potato Hash with Feta and Poached Eggs for any meal.

Sweet Potato Hash with Feta and Poached Eggs
Image and Recipe via The Nest

Avoiding Food Allergies for Food Allergy Awareness Week

Food Allergy Awareness Week 2016

This week is Food Allergy Awareness Week, so we’re bringing you facts about food allergies each day. Learn more.

Food Allergy Breakdown

 

Bodily Reaction

 

Milk and Egg Allergies

 

Allergy Signs and Symptoms

 

Treating a Reaction

 

Cleaning Surfaces

 

Cooking for Those with Food Allergies

 

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Enjoying Breakfast for Dinner

Healthy Breakfast for Dinner Recipes

This week, we featured comfort food classics for you to try breakfast for dinner, or brinner.

First up is a Skillet Sweet Potato Chicken Hash with Eggs that’s tasty and easy.

Skillet Sweet Potato Chicken Hash with Eggs

 

Try these easy Cheesy Mushroom Baked Eggs for Two for a simple night in.

Cheesy Mushroom Baked Eggs for Two
Image and Recipe via An Edible Mosaic

 

Make this Easy Shakshuka , or spicy eggs poached in tomato sauce, tonight.

Easy Shakshuka (Gluten Free)

 

Roasted Tomatoes with Eggs and Quinoa are a quick, filling meal.

Roasted Tomatoes with Eggs and Quinoa
Image and Recipe via This Gal Cooks

 

This Quiche with Butternut Squash and Kale is perfect for dinner or brunch.

Quiche Recipe with Butternut Squash and Kale

 

This Huevos Rancheros Breakfast Stack is impressive and delicious.

Huevos Rancheros
Image and Recipe via Call Me PMC

 

Make these showstopper Mushroom and Egg Breakfast Pastries for any meal.

Mushroom and Egg Breakfast Pastries

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Food Expiration Dates and Safety

Decoding Expiration Dates

Did you know the government doesn’t make food companies put expiration dates on most things? They choose to put those dates on their products so that you get the best quality as a customer, which is why there are so many different kinds of labels.

According to the Boston Globe, 3/4 of Americans think eating things after their printed dates is unsafe. That’s not always true.

What Do the Expiration Dates Mean?

“Sell by” Date

This tells the store how long it can sell the product. You should buy it before this day, but it doesn’t mean that it’s bad after that date. It really just means that it’s freshest before that date.

“Best if used by (or before)” Date

You should use a product before this date for the best quality and flavor, but it has nothing to do with safety.

“Guaranteed fresh” Date

This is usually used for bakery items. You can still eat them after this date, but they won’t be at their freshest.

“Use by” Date

This is the last date a product’s maker recommends you use it for the best quality, much like “best if used by or before” dates.

“Pack” Date

These are dates that are on many canned or packaged goods. They’re used by the manufacturer and do not tell you if the food is safe. They may also be in a code, usually month-day-year, like MMDDYY. So September 29, 2015, would be 092915.

Other Dates

Federal law says that all baby formula must be dated. It is usually marked with a “use by” or “expiration date,” and after that date, the nutrition of the formula begins to decline from what’s shown on the label.

Some states also make stores pull dairy items off the shelves after their expiration dates.

How Long Are Things Good For?

While these dates will help you eat things while they taste the best, you won’t need to rush to throw most things away by those dates.

You should always try to buy your food before these dates expire, but as long as it’s stored at the right temperature and hasn’t been contaminated during cleaning or prep, it can be good after the dates.

Product Dates and Expiration

And of course, it is important to smell and look at your food before you eat it if it’s past those dates (and before them, too). If something smells bad, tastes weird, has rotten spots, or is moldy, don’t eat it! It’s definitely time to throw it away.

You can see more info about dates and food safety from WebMD and the USDA.

Up Next:

Make sure you’re storing your food safely to keep it good for longer.

Are you always cooking things to a safe temperature to avoid foodborne illness? Our guide can help!

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Flaming Hot

Hot Enough

There’s a good reason to make sure you’re always cooking your meat to the right temps: foodborne illness.

Foodborne illness, or food poisoning, is when you eat or drink foods that are contaminated by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or even poisonous chemicals. There are more than 250 different foodborne illnesses. The top 5 are the most dangerous.

Myths vs. Facts

Myth: Food poisoning is rare and not that serious.

Facts:

Foodborne Illness Stats
Statistics via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Myth: I will know if I have food poisoning.

Facts: Food poisoning is often blamed on things like “a stomach bug,” but it can have many symptoms.

The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, and diarrhea. You could experience all of these or just one. It really depends on what caused it.

Myth: This happened because my food was dirty.

Facts: There are lots of reasons this can happen.

Fresh fruit and veggies can be contaminated if they’re washed in tainted water or touched by unwashed hands or sick people who help process the food.

Some healthy animals have certain kinds of bacteria to help their digestion. These can come in contact with the meat you eat during processing. Salmonella, one of the most dangerous foodborne illnesses, can infect a hen so that its eggs are infected from the start.

Leaving raw food to thaw out of the fridge or leaving cooked food out for too long, like at a potluck or BBQ, can let bacteria grow.

Food coming into contact during cooking with raw meats or dirty cutting boards and knives can spread the bacteria to things that were clean!

What Should I Do?

First, make sure you’re washing your fruits and veggies after you buy them and storing things safely.

Heat can kill bacteria, so always make sure you cook your food to the right temperature. You can do this by using a food thermometer.

Place the thermometer in the thickest part of the food, but it shouldn’t be touching bone or fat. Check the temp toward the end of cooking but before you think it will be done. And make sure to clean it well with hot, soapy water between each use.

Use these handy guides to cook and grill your food to safe temperatures:

Meat & Poultry Temperature Guide
Image via Food Network

 

Grill Master Guide
Image via Visual News

Up Next:

Wondering how long your food is actually good for? We can help make sense of all those dates!

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Safe Food Prep

Preparing Your Food Safely

Safe food prep is key to cooking at home. As we’ve talked about before, storing your food correctly and washing it well are both important parts of safe cooking, but food prep is actually where it’s easiest to accidentally contaminate your meal.

Tip #1

Always wash your hands before and after dealing with food and after each time you touch raw meat (before you touch anything else).

Tip #2

Make sure everything is cleaned correctly and that all bruises or rotten spots have been cut off of your fruits and veggies.

Clean the lids off the top of cans before you open them. You never know how many people or things have touched that can before it touches your food!

Tip #3

The fridge is the best place for slow, safe thawing, especially if you thaw out meat unattended while you’re at work or busy during the day. Make sure that thawing meat juices don’t drip on other foods. You can refreeze meat you’ve thawed in the fridge if needed.

You can also put meat in a sealed Ziploc bag and submerge it in cold tap water for faster thawing. You need to change this water every 30 minutes and cook as soon as you’re done thawing it.

If you thaw meat and poultry in the microwave, always cook it right after that.

Don’t just set food out on the counter to thaw!

Tip #4

Don’t cross-contaminate. This is when it’s easiest to accidentally cause sickness!

Keep raw meat, its juices, and eggs away from other food. Use separate cutting boards and knives for raw meat and veggies.

After cutting raw meat, wash cutting boards, utensils, and countertops  with hot, soapy water or a bleach cleaner (1 tablespoon of bleach per gallon of water).

Tip #5

Marinate meat in a closed dish in the fridge. Don’t reuse marinade that has touched raw meat unless you bring it to a boil first.

Up Next:

Make sure you’re always cooking your food to a safe temperature.