Tag Archives: doctors

Plan Ahead for Older Americans Month

Older Americans Month

Age Out Loud!May is Older Americans Month, and it’s time to age out loud by striving for wellness, knowing your rights, staying engaged, and exploring new things.

 

 

Older Americans Month

 

Embracing a healthy diet as you age is an important part of striving for wellness.

A Healthy Diet as You Age

 

Protect yourself by preventing falls year-round with our ultimate guide to fall prevention.

Your Ultimate Guide to Fall Prevention

 

Managing your diseases takes work, but we can help with important info and resources.

Disease Resources

 

Thinking about downsizing as you get older? Long View has advice to help.

Long View: The Key to Downsizing

 

Know your rights and plan for future healthcare decisions now with advance directives.

Stay engaged and get the most out of your doctor’s appointments by preparing ahead.

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctor’s Appointment

 

If you want to explore new things, finding a new hobby could help you get started.

National Hobby Month

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Blaze a Trail as You Age

Vantage Point: Blaze a Trail

An excerpt from North Central Washington Museum’s “The History of a Thriving Anomaly” describes how the local community thought the Wenatchee Valley Clinic, which opened on April Fools’ Day 1940, wouldn’t last 6 months. They couldn’t have been more wrong.

The tiny clinic was founded by a surgeon, Albert Donald Haug, a radiologist, Lloyd Smith, and an internist with a knack for keeping patients happy, Lumir Martin Mares, and it brought together specialists at a time when most doctors worked alone.

Haug and Mares believed that their little clinic could meet the same standards as those in the East, and they brought together a range of specialists and cutting-edge equipment and training to become the second-largest clinic in the region.

“We knew it would grow,” Dr. Smith said, “but none of us had any idea it would grow to what it is now.”

The clinic brought together its doctors then, and it brings together patients and doctors now. Because of their dream, its nearly 170 doctors treat people from around the world today.

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy decided that every May, we would honor older Americans and their contributions to our communities and country. This year’s theme, “Blaze a Trail,” celebrates older adults who are taking charge of their health, engaging in their communities, and positively impacting the lives of others, just like Wenatchee Valley Clinic’s remarkable founders.

Health Alliance will honor older Americans this month by partnering with Confluence Health to hold an educational event about the treatment and prevention of hypertension and strokes on May 25 and by teaming up with community agencies and businesses in planning the 3rd annual senior-focused health fair at Pybus Public Market on June 4.

Health insurance can be challenging, but as I think about those trailblazing doctors, I remember that hard work, progressive thinking, and the camaraderie of partners like you can help turn the dream of making a positive impact through quality care within this wonderful place we all live a reality.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. She has four sons and two grandsons. During her time off, she performs as part of a rodeo drill team on her horse, Skeeter.

Fighting for Endometriosis Awareness Month

Endometriosis Awareness Month

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month. Endometriosis is a disorder in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside the uterus.

What is Endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis affects 176 million women from 15 to 49 years old worldwide.

The Reach of Endometriosis

 

Endometriosis isn’t caused by your lifestyle, but the severe pain it causes can hurt your quality of life.

Hurting Your Quality of Life

 

28% of women with endometriosis suffer from infertility.

Fighting the Effects of Endometriosis

 

Women with endometriosis usually aren’t diagnosed for 7 to 11 years, preventing many from having kids or living normal lives.

Identifying Endometriosis

 

Women usually see 7 doctors before endometriosis treatment starts. Raising awareness of what’s normal in teens and women can help!

Find a march or host a Yellow Tutu Tea Party and help fight endometriosis.

Make a Difference in Endometriosis

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Inspirational Stories

Inspirational Stories for the New Year

With the internet, it’s easy to see how small actions can make a big difference, especially in charity and medical funding. For the new year, we’re bringing you some inspirational stories that motivate you to get involved.

The story of Devon Still’s daughter who has cancer and how the Bengals have rallied around her and fighting the disease is both moving and inspiring.

A new mom whose heart hadn’t beat in 45 minutes spontaneously resuscitated last year, astounding doctors.

Did you see the viral story of Batkid last year and how San Francisco and Make-a-Wish came together to make his dreams come true? Learn more and get involved.

We all know the impact a nurse’s care can have, especially this Boston Marathon bombing victim who married his nurse.

Read the inspirational story of how one little boy’s kindness launched a charity.

These twin sisters were separated at birth and found each other online. Now they help others reunite.

A boy in Canada raised over $54,000 for his friend’s cerebral palsy surgery by selling lemonade.

Love Story through Alzheimer's

Chasing Health: Member’s Love Story of Caring for Wife with Alzheimer’s

As a writer, I get to interview all kinds of people about all kinds of topics, and sometimes I come across a story that gives me goosebumps.

Earlier this year, I interviewed Cary Ulrich, a member who lives in Washington, for the spring issue of House Calls, one of our Medicare newsletters. This former drafter and current fire photographer was kind enough to share his heartfelt story with me.

Cary’s wife was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s a few years ago and passed away after we published this article. But for nearly three years, Cary was her primary caregiver, a tough task for a person watching someone he loves suffer from a disease that does not yet have a cure.

I don’t know if I could handle it, but Cary did. And he even found a way to make something positive out of it. Today, Cary leads caregiver support groups and is writing a book to capture how grateful he is for the time he spent with the love of his life.

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, and with Thanksgiving coming up, I think it’s the perfect time to share Cary’s story of being grateful while making sacrifices. Maybe it’ll inspire you to join the cause to end Alzheimer’s or thank a caregiver.

Take a Minute to Care about Caregivers

Cary Ulrich, a second-year Health Alliance Medicare member, likes a challenge. The one-time drafter and surveyor at an engineering firm went from designing layouts for Wenatchee Valley’s buildings and subdivisions to taking photos on the frontlines of wildfires.

The toughest challenge he faced wasn’t learning the art of drafting by hand before the drafting world went digital, and it wasn’t going out on his first fire call to take pictures of people putting their lives on the line to save others. It wasn’t even a challenge he enjoyed, but it was his most important, being a caregiver for one of the people he loves most, his wife.

Sharon Ulrich was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s (a type of dementia) after showing some confusing symptoms, like having visions of everything from Old English-style visitors to spies and people trying to break into her home.

At first, doctors couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Was it depression? Dementia? And if she had dementia, what kind was it? At 63 years old, she seemed too young for that.

While doctors looked for answers, Cary stayed by his wife’s side. From her earliest symptoms and first diagnosis in March 2010 to moving her to an adult home in February 2013, Cary was a caregiver. And he quickly learned that being a caregiver can take its own toll.

“I was on the outside going through everything,” he says. “I was very frustrated and angry at the situation, not at her. I had all those feelings, and no one seemed to care about me.”

He watched his wife’s health get worse while knowing he couldn’t help her get better. The woman who’d walked past his back-row church pew almost two decades ago, the one he thought was way too classy to ever even talk to him, now needed him to be her caregiver.

Cary and Sharon

“It’s a hard process,” he says. “I don’t exactly know how I did it, but I’ve gotten to the point where I’ve had to let go of what was and just totally accept her for the person she is now.”

Cary never backed down. Instead, he used his experience of caring for a loved one with dementia to help others do the same, turning his negative situation into something positive.

Today, Cary helps run two caregiver support groups, one specific to dementia at the Grief Place of North Central Washington and a more general one at Aging and Adult Care of Central Washington in East Wenatchee. In both groups, Cary gives support and tips to other caregivers because he believes it will help them feel better and make smarter choices about their own loved ones.

“The more you know when these things happen, the more you can kind of accept them,” he says. “You know you’re going to have to change because your loved one has changed and can’t go back the other way.”

He also talks to nursing classes at Wenatchee Valley College and to first responders in different fire districts to help them know how to work with people with dementia and the family and friends who care for them.

Cary takes on other challenges, too, like helping put on the annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Wenatchee. Last year, he lined up sponsors, set up, and took photos for the 2-mile event that raised money and awareness.

Wenatchee's Walk to End Alzheimer's

Cary’s selflessness shines through in everything he does, and the man who likes to take on challenges and still goes out on fire calls hopes to make caregivers’ lives less challenging in the future.

“As a caregiver, you have the memories of what was, but all you have is what is. It’s a very difficult place to be. I know what these caregivers are going through, though. And I want them to know they are valued and can still enjoy life.”

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Discovering Effective Alzheimer's Disease Treatments

National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month

This month is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Take the Purple Pledge to support people facing it today.

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The first trial that’s trying to prevent Alzheimer’s before symptoms start is happening now from BBC News.

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It’s important to know the signs of Alzheimer’s to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Intelligence Therapy

 

This touching story from the New York Times Magazine will remind you why we must end Alzheimer’s.

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Find facts and figures and resources, or find a walk to support a cure.

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Studies like this one are working hard to figure what exactly causes Alzheimer’s, from The Economist.

MRI Image Brain On Black Background

Doctors and scientists are getting close to effective treatments in the journey to end Alzheimer’s, from Forbes.

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Scoliosis Awareness

Scoliosis Awareness Month

June is Scoliosis Awareness Month, to help you learn more and catch it early.

Early detection is key to helping sufferers avoid a lifetime of complications. Catching it early can help stop its progress while kids are still growing.

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2 to 3% of the American population, about 7 million people suffer from scoliosis, the curvature of the spine.

Curvature of the Spine

 

Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity in the U.S., and in 85% of the cases, we don’t know the cause.

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People of all races and genders can suffer from scoliosis, but women are 8 times more likely to suffer from a serious enough case to need treatment.

Scoliosis and Treatment

 

Scoliosis usually starts between the ages of 10 and 15, but can be slowed or stopped with non-surgical treatments while kids are still young.

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It was International Scoliosis Awareness Day yesterday! Learn more about it and its treatments.

Scoliosis screenings are a simple test to check for normal appearance in the spine. Make sure your kids go to regular doctors appointments to get checked!

Pediatrician examining little girl with back problems.

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