Tag Archives: diseases

Deciding on a Balanced Diet

Eating a Balanced Diet

Focusing on a balanced diet is one of the best ways to make healthy eating a part of your life.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans

The USDA sets Dietary Guidelines for Americans regularly to help guide balanced diet choices. While these guidelines can seem complicated, there are key takeaways from them you should know.

The Importance of Healthy Eating

Healthy eating helps prevent and slow the onset of diseases, like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

Include in a Balanced Diet

A healthy and balanced diet, which for most people is around 2,000 calories a day, includes a variety of:

  • Vegetables, including a variety of dark green, red, and orange veggies, legumes, which include beans and peas, and starchy veggies, like corn and potatoes.
  • Fruits, especially whole fruits, like apples and oranges, which are the perfect serving  size.
  • Grains, at least half of which are whole grain.
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy (like milk, yogurt, and cheese) or appropriate substitutes.
  • A variety of foods high in protein, like lean meats, poultry, eggs, seafood, beans,  soy-based products (like tofu), nuts and seeds.
  • Oils (like canola, olive, peanut, and soybean) or naturally occurring oils in nuts, seeds, olives, and avocados.

Limit in a Balanced Diet

  • Added sugars should make up less than 10% of your daily calories, which can be hidden in processed and prepared foods, like soda, cereal, cookies, and more.
  • Limit saturated and trans fats, which should make up less than 10% of your daily calories. Foods high in these include butter, whole milk, and palm oil. Replace with unsaturated fats, like canola and olive oil whenever you can.
  • Limit sodium to less than 2,300 mg per day. Processed foods, like pizza, and canned soup and sauces can be high in this salt.

A Balanced Diet with MyPlate

MyPlate replaced the food pyramid as the guide to making sense of servings. It helps you look at your plate and strike a balance with each meal.

This chart can help you divide your own plates appropriately: MyPlate

Fruits and veggies should make up about half of your plate, with just over a quarter filled with whole grains, and protein should be under a quarter. (A few ounces of meat, a piece about the size of the palm of your hand, is a good serving size for most people.) Also work in a small serving of dairy through milk, cheese, or yogurt to round out your meal.

Making Smart Choices

Combine these guidelines with smart choices, and you’ll be well on your way to eating a balanced diet. And making these smart choices doesn’t have to be difficult. There are lots of tips and tricks that can help you make a balanced diet a part of your daily life.

Tracking Your Food

Then, you can target the number of servings you should be getting of the different food groups.

These can help you figure out calorie counts and limit sodium and sugar.

This can help you understand how balanced your diet and food servings are and set and reach food goals.

Making and Meeting Food Goals

  • Start small.

Making small changes in your eating habits can have long-term effects:

  • Switch to high fiber, low-sugar cereals.
  • Give up soda with flavored sparkling waters.
  • When you’re hungry, try drinking a glass of water before you eat something.
  • Plan for all of the places you go in life:
    • Instead of eating out for lunch at work, start planning and meal-prepping ahead of time, and avoid the vending machines.
    • If you know your kids aren’t making great food choices at school, get them involved in packing lunches they’ll love ahead of time.
    • When you know you’ll spend the day at the mall, carry snacks and a water bottle, eat a healthy breakfast or snack before you head out, and skip the food court. If you just can’t avoid a meal or a snack while you’re out, find the healthiest option. Load up a sandwich with veggies, get frozen yogurt without all kinds of extra sweet toppings instead of ice cream, and choose hot tea or unsweetened iced tea instead of a frappachino.
    • Check menus for calorie counts when you’re eating out. Ask for salad dressings and sauces on the side, avoid fried foods, and keep in mind that alcoholic drinks can be full of calories.
    • Many communities have community gardens. Join in and help out to get moving and to grow things your whole family can enjoy in meals.

Results and Rewards

  • Don’t beat yourself up when you have missteps.

Everyone struggles with giving up the foods full of sugar and salt that they love, so it’s important to stay positive and get back on track.

  • Plan your cheat day.

Many people have found that planning a weekly cheat day can help them stay on course knowing they can treat themselves later. And once you get used to a balanced diet, you’ll find that you’ll cheat in smaller and smaller ways, even on the day you’re allowed to.

  • Find healthy ways to treat yourself.

For example, do you love watermelon or raspberries? Splurge on the healthy treats you love. Enjoy a piece of dark chocolate each day or a glass of red wine each week. Another option, reward meeting your goals with a treat that isn’t food-related, like a new outfit, book, or manicure.

Up Next:

Now that you know the value of a balanced diet, learn to prepare before you go grocery shopping and shop smart to meet your goals.

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Safe Summertime Fun with Summer Safety Tips

Summer Safety Tips for Kids

We highlighted some important summer safety tips for your kids.

First up for the 4th of July, make sure you handle fireworks safely.

Fireworks Safety

 

Protect yourself and your kids from skin cancer by playing it safe in the sun.

Skin Cancer Awareness Month

 

Keep it smart around water this summer with these easy tips.

Water Safety

 

Use an insect repellent to prevent bug bites and protect kids from diseases.

Help your kids reach a healthy weight by moving and eating in-season fruits and veggies.

Help Your Kids Reach a Healthy Weight

 

Keep these tips in mind while your kids are playing sports this summer.

Sports Safety Tips

 

Are you ready for the new school year? Make sure your kids are by scheduling checkups now.

Summer Health Checklist

Prepare for Camping Safety

Camping Safety

It’s National Camping Month, so we had some camping safety tips to keep you safe on your big trips this summer.

Make sure you get vaccinated before your next camping trip to protect against diseases.

When you’re packing to camp, make sure you separate raw and cooked food in waterproof containers and keep them in a cooler.

Packing Smart

 

Put together a camping first aid kit with this list from the American Red Cross.

Be Prepared

 

These tips can help you set up your tent safely.

10 Tent Tips for Happy Camping
Image via Brandon Gaille

 

Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning by never using fuel-burning equipment in an enclosed shelter and don’t set up your tent too close to the campfire.

Cooking Smart When Camping

 

Protect yourself from poisonous plants while hiking.

How to Prevent Contact with Poisonous Plants
Image via Fix.com

 

Use insect repellent with DEET to fight mosquitos and ticks to avoid bites and some diseases.

Protect Yourself While Camping

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National Infant Immunization Week

National Infant Immunization Week 2016

National Infant Immunization Week ended this week, so we helped connect you to resources. Protect your baby from 14 serious diseases by age 2.

Protect Your Baby with Vaccines

 

Besides whooping cough and measles, what other diseases do vaccines protect against?

Protecting Against Serious Diseases

 

Did you know protection from vaccine-preventable diseases starts before birth?

Protecting Them Before Birth

 

Have you ever wondered how vaccines protect your child against diseases?

How Do They Work?

 

Have your kids missed one or more of their shots? This tool can help you catch up.

Catching Up on Shots

 

Quickly see when your child needs each vaccine with immunization schedules.

Shots can be stressful. Learn how to comfort your kids when they get one.

Sticking to a Schedule of Shots

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Warm and Cozy Winter Relaxation

Chasing Health: Writing, Resting, and Winning Winter

Even with an occasional 60-degree day, February isn’t exactly my favorite month for getting active (or doing anything really, except maybe watching college basketball and catching up on TV shows). I prefer to spend my winter under a warm blanket with a giant sweatshirt and my bunny slippers, remote in hand, butt on couch.

The Infamous Bunny Slippers

As someone who thinks the first snow of the season is magical and who saw Star Wars: The Force Awakens (chock-full of hope from crawl to credits) three times this winter, I know if I’m running a little low on hope and motivation, lots of others probably are, too. After the holiday goodies go stale, I’m kind of done with winter. The mere thought of being outside in the cold makes me cringe. (Once again, thank goodness for those rare warm February days.)

Despite the snow, ice, and occasional subzero wind chills (gross), you don’t have to hibernate for the whole season. A little rest mixed with a hobby here and there is a great recipe for a productive and satisfying winter, even if you’re like me and think stepping outside in the cold is pure torture.

Winter is the perfect time to knock some indoor projects, big or small, off your to-do list. Hobbies can be great for your overall health, even if they’re not fitness related, by helping you reduce stress and sharpen your mind. And there’s no shame in resting, either.

In fact, relaxation is healthy, too. It not only helps refresh your mind, but it also helps lower your risk for certain diseases. Relaxation doesn’t mean lying in bed all day doing nothing. You can take some time to do something you love, catch up with a friend or family member on the phone (or in person if you’re ready to brave the cold), or try a new, relaxing hobby.

Winter is a gift-wrapped, guilt-free excuse handed to us each year (at least in the northern half of the United States), allowing us to put off our outdoor activities for about three months.

I need to cherish that gift, and here’s a short list of how I plan to do so with a mixture of stimulating and relaxing hobbies. You can customize the list and make the most of winter, too.

Nicole’s Ultimate Relaxation & At-Home Projects List

Make my dream a reality.

Although writing is literally my job, after years of writing about real-life events and health facts, I want to try my hand at fiction. I’ve dreamed of writing a novel since grade school, and it’s at the top of my bucket list (or sunshine list, as my friend aptly named it).

The verdict is still out on whether I’m any good, but this item is mostly about achieving a personal goal. Plus, writing is the perfect indoor activity for me (I can wear my bunny slippers AND make my dream come true).

Complete a major organization project.

Although it’s not quite as empowering as writing an entire novel, I would love to someday have every photo I’ve ever taken, or at least the good ones, organized both digitally and in print. (Not having printed photos makes me uneasy every time I watch a post-apocalyptic TV show or movie). Like my book, this one will take more than a season, but it’s another activity I can do inside.

I’m staying away from scrapbooking, though. I learned firsthand while creating a (very thorough) scrapbook of my senior year of high school that my perfectionism and scrapbooking don’t mix well when stress relief is my goal.

Take something old and make it new.

I spent a large chunk of last winter painting Mason jars to use as brightly colored vases in my apartment. I also started saving and painting olive, pickle, and pepper jars in the process, and suddenly, I had a winter hobby. I love olives, pickles, and peppers almost as much as candy, so my collection grew pretty quickly.

They were easy to paint (there are different techniques with varying degrees of difficulty) and reminded me of spring.

Mason Jar Project

Get active.

There are plenty of physical activities you can do without getting out in the nasty weather. Last winter, I started a step challenge. I got a LOT of steps, about 10,000 per day, sometimes closer to 20,000, mostly by walking around my apartment during commercial breaks, sporting events, and phone conversations. (Sorry, downstairs neighbors.)

I sometimes also do pushups, squats, crunches, and various other exercises while watching TV, and my all-time favorite exercise, dancing, is living room-friendly as well. Basically, as long as dancing and/or being able to watch TV is on the table, I’m a fan of exercise.

Channel my inner kid.

I’m somewhat of an expert at this one. For instance, I ate SpaghettiOs while writing this blog post.

Anyway, adult coloring books are a thing now. My co-workers and I have started having coloring nights after work. I use a kid coloring book, though. To me, the adult ones look too tough to be fun, and I’m a bigger fan of Disney characters than abstract designs anyway.

Coloring books can help you relieve stress and relax while also stimulating your brain, and they’re a nice indoor escape.

Get Coloring

Health Alliance Coloring Club
Health Alliance’s Coloring Club

Spruce up for spring.

Spring sprang in my apartment about a week ago because, like I’ve mentioned again and again, I’m tired of the cold. Decorating helps me cut back on boredom and allows for some creativity. Once it’s done, it’s a daily reminder that spring isn’t too far away. I highly recommend this one.

Spring Decor Everywhere

Enjoy those rare warm days.

If it’s going to be 60 degrees outside (or even upper 50s), I intend to get out and enjoy the spring-like temperature. As much as my relaxation and indoor projects list motivates me, nothing is quite as motivating as being able to go outside on a sunny day in a spring jacket.

 

Disclaimer: While the items on this list can help you fight boredom, escape from stress, feel accomplished, and stimulate your mind, they’re not magic. Winter will still be winter.

When the relaxation and indoor hobbies aren’t masking the winter grind, just remember, jelly bean season is in full swing, and pitchers and catchers reported this week. Spring will come.

Jelly Bean Season!

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Breastfeeding Your Newborn

World Breastfeeding Week

It’s World Breastfeeding Week and National Breastfeeding Month. Do you know the benefits?

The health benefits apply to mothers and their babies in both developed and developing countries.

Two month old baby sleeping

 

Breast milk is perfectly suited for a baby’s nutritional needs, and the process helps mothers and babies bond.

It’s also unmatched in its immune-boosting and anti-inflammatory properties that protect mothers and babies from many illnesses.

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Formula feeding increases the risk of common childhood infections and some rare but serious infections and diseases, like leukemia.

Shot of an attractive young woman bonding with her baby girl while doing yoga

 

The risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is 56% higher for babies who were never breastfed.

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Mothers who never breastfed are also at a higher risk for certain health issues, like breast and ovarian cancer.

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The U.S. is one of only 3 countries in the world without a guaranteed maternity leave, which can be important for breastfeeding moms.

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Defeating Juvenile Arthritis

Juvenile Arthritis

July is Juvenile Arthritis Month, and nearly 300,000 kids in the U.S. suffer from a form of it.

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Many parents write off kids’ swollen joints, fevers, or rashes as other issues. But these are actually common signs of arthritis.

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Arthritis in kids can take on an autoimmune form, which can hurt their ability to fight normal diseases and grow.

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Autoimmune forms of arthritis cause kids’ immune systems to attack their own joints, causing swelling, stiffness, and permanent damage.

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The autoimmune forms of arthritis in kids can also have serious effects if untreated, including loss of mobility, blindness, and death.

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Arthritis takes a toll on people of all ages, and can hurt a normal childhood. Read some kids’ stories and learn about the cause.

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You can make a difference! Make a donation to research or buy gear that supports and promotes awareness of kids’ arthritis.

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