Tag Archives: cooking

National Country Cooking Month

National Country Cooking Month

It’s National Country Cooking Month, and we have recipes to help you make delicious comfort food that’s healthy too.

First up, find Healthier Mac & Cheese recipes that will keep you and your kids happy.

Healthier Mac & Cheese
Image and Recipe via The Greatist

 

Make this Unbelievably Moist Turkey Meatloaf for a lighter version of the classic.

Unbelievably Moist Turkey Meatloaf

Unbelievably Moist Turkey Meatloaf Recipe

 

Satisfy your brunch comfort food craving with Oven-Baked Chicken and Waffles.

Oven-Baked Chicken and Waffles
Image and Recipe via Womanista

 

Your family won’t believe that this Loaded Cauliflower Mash is healthy.

Loaded Cauliflower (low carb, keto)

 

Whip up Cheesy Garlic Pork Chops for a healthier version of the hearty dinner.

Cheesy Garlic Pork Chops
Image and Recipe via Womanista

 

This moist and delicious Oven-Baked BBQ Chicken will be a hit this summer.

Super Moist Oven Baked BBQ Chicken

 

Don’t skimp on your favorites with lighter Southern Shrimp and Grits.

Southern Shrimp and Grits
Image and Recipe via Womanista

Protection to Prevent Burn

Burn Awareness Week

It’s Burn Awareness Week. Burns continue to be one of the leading causes of accidental death in the U.S. and can cause lasting pain and disabilities in survivors.

Don't Get Burned

 

Avoid burns and scalds while cooking with these tips.

 

Use the back burners while you cook, and turn pot handles away from the stove’s edge.

Back Burners to Avoid Burns

 

Use oven mitts and pot holders, and make sure you replace old and worn mitts.

Children, elderly people, and the disabled are at the highest risk for burns, and almost 1/3 of all burns happen to kids under 15.

Preventing Burns and Scars

 

Children under 5 are 2.4 times more likely than the general population to suffer burn injuries that need emergency treatment.

Protecting Kids from Burns

 

Never carry children while preparing or drinking hot liquids (or foods) and teach them burn safety.

Fighting Food Waste in Your LIfe

Fight Food Waste

Have you ever bought a bunch of groceries, only to have plans change and food go to waste? Fresh fruits and veggies that go bad in your fridge before you make that recipe or snack on them? Leftovers that you got sick of without finishing?

This is a problem millions of Americans run into every day, and it’s called food waste.

Food Waste by the Numbers

Right now, the world produces more than enough food to feed everyone, 17% more per person than it did in the early 1960s. And yet, in 2015, 42.2 million Americans faced hunger and trouble affording food.

An estimated 25 to 40% of food in the U.S. goes to waste instead of being eaten. And when food goes into a landfill, it also produces a greenhouse gas that’s bad for the environment. All those lost groceries add up to about $165 billion lost every year.

Reducing your food waste can help you save money, and it’s good for the rest of the world. And the great news is it’s easy.

Shop Smart

  1. Prepare to shop. Have a plan and buy exactly what you need to at the grocery store .
  2. Make smart decisions at the store. Don’t stock up on a sale item if you know you can’t use it before it goes bad.
  3. Know yourself. Pay attention to how much of something your family really eats so you can buy the right amount. If you live alone, don’t buy fruit in bulk (unless you really love apples). If you hate cooking, don’t stock up on things that have to be cooked.
  4. Buy the odd-looking fruits and veggies. Many are thrown away because their size, shape, or color doesn’t look perfect, but they’re actually just as good.

Save at Home

  1. First In, First Out. When you unpack your groceries, make sure you’re putting the newest food in the back so older things get used first.
  2. Store food in the right place. Many foods will last longer if you know how to store them.
  3. Pay attention to what you toss. If you keep throwing away half of the spaghetti sauce you make, try freezing half of it or cutting the recipe in half.
  4. Think about expiration dates. Make sure you know how they work, and try to make meals that let you use up things that are closer to expiring.
  5. Use all of an ingredient. Whenever possible, use all of what you’re cooking with, like leaving the skin on potatoes. Use citrus rinds and zest to add flavor to sauces and desserts. And the skin and stems of most fruits and veggies are safe to eat and have extra nutrients that you need.
  6. Use your freezer. Freeze fruits and veggies you can’t use up before they go bad for easy smoothies. Store extras from recipes.
  7. Eat leftovers. Take them for lunch, skip cooking the next night, or freeze them for an easy dinner later.
  8. Share. Split a huge dish when you’re eating out or take home the leftovers for an easy meal later. If you made too much of a meal, bring a dish of it to family or friends.

A little thought can go a long way toward helping you reduce food waste in your home and save you money.

Up Next:

Prepare your food safely and make sure you’re cooking your food safely to protect your family and prevent illness.

Camping Meals & Campfire Delights

Healthy Camping Meals

To go along with our National Camping Month safety tips, we also featured some healthy camping meals you can make on the campfire.

First up were easy Breakfast Burritos that you can just throw in the fire.

Breakfast Burritos – Campfire Style

 

Lumberjack Breakfast combines your favorite breakfast fixings in one packet.

Lumberjack Breakfast In Foil Packet

 

These Campfire Tex Mex White Bean and Chicken Foil Packets are a breeze to make.

Campfire Tex Mex White Bean Chicken Foil Packets

 

This BBQ Party Pack is the perfect side dish or vegetarian meal while camping.

BBQ Party Pack

 

Hobo Dinners are foil packets of meat, potatoes, and veggies perfect for camping.

Hobo Dinners

 

Foil Wrapped Salmon with Herbs and Lemon is great made with fresh fish.

Foil Wrapped Salmon with Herbs and Lemon
Image via Roadtrippers

 

Reheat this Whole Wheat Pasta with Goat Cheese & Tomatoes in Foil over the fire.

Whole Wheat Pasta in Foil Recipe with Goat Cheese & Tomatoes…For Camping!

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Grocery Shopping Fresh

Grocery Shopping Like a Pro

Even after you’ve gotten ready to head to the store, grocery shopping on a budget for healthy meals can be hard. But there are some things you can do to make it easier.

Stock Your Pantry

Keeping your kitchen stocked with certain key things can make cooking easy. This list has some items that are perfect for this. And this article has some healthy foods perfect for your pantry that only cost about $2.

Add one item that won’t go bad, like a spice, grain, beans, or frozen veggies to your cart each shopping trip to help you build your pantry without dropping a lot of money at once. (These are also good things to buy in bulk when they’re on sale if you have space to store them.)

Having this stocked pantry will help you throw together meals fast, help you save on packaged or premade meals you might’ve grabbed in a hurry, and make shopping easier.

Choosing Your Store

Choosing where you shop can also help you save. Besides the grocery store, some great places to find good deals are:

  • Ethnic markets
  • Dollar stores
  • Retail supercenters
  • Wholesale clubs
  • Farmers markets

At the Store

Once you’re at the store, you should try to shop the outer edge of it as much as possible. The outer edge usually has the fresh produce, like fruits and veggies, meat, dairy, bread, and frozen food. It’s typically the inner aisles that are full of boxed and processed foods.

Fruits & Veggies

It’s recommended that you eat 5 servings of veggies a day, so it’s important to really use that part of the store. With that in mind, fruits and veggies, fresh or frozen, should take up about a third of your cart on each shopping trip.

  • Shop in season 

At the farmers market, you have to buy what’s in season, but at the grocery store, there are lots of choices. But when you buy what’s in season, you can save a lot, and your food will be the tastiest and freshest it can be. This list can help you find what’s in season when.

  • Buy bags at the right time

With certain go-to things your family will always use, like apples, oranges, potatoes, and onions, buying them in the big bags when they’re in season can help you save even more.

  • Stock up on canned and frozen fruits and veggies

Canned and frozen fruits and veggies are picked while they’re in season and tasting best, and they’re good for you, too. So instead of buying fresh peas when they’re not in season, stock up on frozen ones to save and get the best flavor. Plus, they last much longer.

Look for frozen veggies without added sauces or butter. Choose canned fruit in 100% fruit juice and veggies with “low-sodium” or “no salt added.”

Canned veggies and broths are perfect for easy soups and stews, and canned fruit makes great fruit salad and snacks for the kids.

Packaged Goods

Avoid a lot of the packaged and processed foods in the center of the store. Cookies, candy, chips, crackers, and soda are all high in things you don’t want, like sugar, salt, and bad fats, and low in things like protein and nutrients. They’re also expensive.

  • Look for whole grains

Be careful you don’t get fooled by things that just call out wheat. Instead, look for whole grains and whole-grain breads.

  • Find high-protein foods besides meat

Yogurt and cheeses are great sources of protein, as are beans and other legumes, which you can find dried or canned.

  • Be smart about cereal

Cereals are one of the top foods for hidden sugar. Look for ones with little or no sugar. You can always add honey to flavor it in the bowl. Also look for cereals high in fiber to start your day right.

  • Try new things in the bulk aisle

If you want to try a new grain, nut, or dried fruit, the bulk aisle with bins is a great way to taste test. Scoop out a small bag for your family to taste before buying bigger servings.

Shopping Tips

Make the most of your trip by paying attention to how your store organizes things, their price tags, and food labels.

  • Don’t shop at eye level

Stores oftentimes stock the most expensive things right where they’ll catch your eye. Looking at the upper and lower shelves can help you find the best deal.

  • Grab from the back

Stores also stock from the back, putting newer things behind the older ones. Grabbing from the back gets you fresher food with better expiration dates, so your food will be good for longer.

  • Look for store brands

Many stores have their own brands of items, and in most cases, you’ll get the exact same or very similar thing at a much better price.

  • Read the label

Reading the nutrition label can tell you a lot about what’s in a food, if it’s good for you, and help you choose between brands.

  • Pay attention to serving sizes

Some things might seem good for you until you check the serving size. Sometimes the serving size is much smaller than what you’d actually eat in a sitting, which makes the numbers on the label look better.

  • Learn how to read unit price on the price tag

Unit price tells you how much something costs per pound, ounce, quart, or other unit of measure. It can tell you which brands are the most affordable. This guide can help you read or calculate unit price.

  • Have a calculator handy

Whether it’s on your phone or you bring a small calculator along to the store, having one on hand can make it easy to compare labels and costs.

Up Next:

Learn how to read and make sense of nutrition labels to get the most out of your food.

Healthy Eating Together for National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month 2016

This month is National Nutrition Month, and this year encourages you to savor the flavor of eating right.

Social food experiences, like family dinners holiday gatherings, and meals with friends, can help you cook healthier meals together.

Eating Socially

 

Savor your food. When you notice the flavors and textures of the food, you’ll enjoy it more and feel full faster.

 

Enjoying food traditions can help you get cooking. Learn to make your family’s traditional dishes and find healthy substitutes, like low-sodium soy sauce.

Traditional Comfort Food

 

Think about where you eat. If you eat at your desk or TV a lot, try somewhere you can focus on your food instead of multitasking.

 

Consider talking to a nutritionist. They can help you make informed food choices based on your personal needs.

Personal Food Choices

 

Cut back on salt with fresh products, by cooking at home, and by flavoring food with herbs and citrus.

 

Avoid soda and sugary snacks. Small portions of sweet treats or fruits can satisfy your sweet tooth.

Avoiding Excess Sugar

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Turnip Recipes for All

Healthy Turnip Recipes

This week, we featured healthy in-season turnip recipes for your family.

First up were Sweet Potato, Turnip, and Parsnip Latkes for an easy appetizer.

Simple Sundays | Sweet Potato, Turnip and Parsnip Latkes

 

This Potato, Turnip, and Mushroom Gratin is a healthy and delicious side for any meal.

Potato Turnip Gratin
Image and Recipe via Jeanette’s Healthy Living

 

This Red Lentil Soup with Chicken and Turnips is great for a cold evening.

Red Lentil Soup
Image and Recipe via Cooking and Beer

 

Mashed Carrots and Turnips are a tasty way to get your kids to eat their veggies.

Mashed Carrots and Turnips

 

 

These Rosemary and Garlic Turnip Noodles can satisfy your pasta cravings.

Rosemary & Garlic Turnip Noodles

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