Tag Archives: brain

Preventing High Blood Pressure

Stroke Awareness Month and High Blood Pressure Education Month

It’s National Stroke Awareness Month and National High Blood Pressure Education Month. Learn more about managing your blood pressure.

Blood Pressure and Cholesterol Resources

 

Stroke is 1 of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S., but it doesn’t have to be. For Stroke Month, learn how you can treat and prevent stroke with tools from the CDC.

Preventing Strokes

 

On average, 1 American dies from a stroke every 4 minutes. But there is good news; up to 80% of strokes are preventable. Take action to lower your risk for stroke with these resources from Million Hearts.

Lower Stroke Risk

 

Can you spot the signs and symptoms of a stroke? Knowing how to spot a stroke and respond quickly could potentially save a life. Put your stroke knowledge to the test with this quiz.

Stroke Signs Symptoms

 

Time lost is brain lost. Every minute counts! If you or someone you know shows symptoms of a stroke, call 911 right away.

Act FAST to Spot a Stroke

 

From the first symptoms of stroke to recovery at home, here’s how the CDC Coverdell Program connects healthcare professionals across the system of care to save lives and improve care.

Stroke Awareness Month

 

High blood pressure can increase your risk for stroke. This Stroke Month, make blood pressure control your goal with tips from Million Hearts.

Lowering Your Blood Pressure

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Eating the Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean Diet Recipes

It’s National Mediterranean Diet Month, and research has proven that it’s great for not just weight loss but also your heart and brain.

Get started by focusing on fruits, veggies, whole grains, fish, and healthy fats.

Mediterranean Diet
Image via Health..com

 

A hearty side to try the Mediterranean Diet is Mediterranean Barley with Chickpeas.

Mediterranean Barley with Chickpeas

 

Whip up tasty Lemon Chickpea and Tuna Salad for a light lunch.

Lemony Chickpea and Tuna Salad

 

Make these Greek-Style Turkey Burgers with Yogurt Sauce and skip the beef.

Greek-Style Turkey Burgers with Yogurt Sauce
Image and Recipe via The Iron You

 

This simple Baked Salmon with Dill is a showstopper for parties or any day of the week.

Baked Salmon with Dill
Image and Recipe via My Fitness Pal

 

One-Pot Lemon Pasta with Greens and Sun-Dried Tomatoes is quick and delicious.

One Pot Lemon Pasta with Greens and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

 

Make Baked Cod with Chickpeas for a heart-healthy and hearty dinner any night.

Baked Cod with Chickpeas
Image and Recipe via Clean Eating Mag

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Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week

Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week

Last week was Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week. Olympians Michael Phelps and Allison Schmitt helped raise awareness about children’s mental health.

Happy, Healthy Children

 

Your children may seem healthy, but you never know what’s happening in their heads.

 

Community members can help young adults by knowing the signs.

 

You can help a young adult with mental health issues by being a source of support.

 

Communicating with your doctor and family about your mental health is an important lesson to teach your kids. Teach them to share their feelings.

Children and young adults with mental health problems need real care and support.

 

Social health, which could include friendships and bullying, is an important part of your kids’ mental health. Learn more and talk to them.

Their Emotional and Social Support System

Life in Grey Dementia

Vantage Point: A Glimpse into Dementia

“It only takes 20 minutes,” Melissa Knott, community relations coordinator for Highgate Senior Living in Wenatchee, told us as she invited Erin Cass, Mary Brandt, and me to participate in a sensory experience called the Virtual Dementia Tour.

Little did we know that the simulation, which helps family members and caregivers understand the overwhelming effects of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, would be an unforgettable and personally revealing experience.

Since I’d learned about the tour beforehand, I thought I knew what to expect as I was outfitted and given instructions, but I was not prepared for my brain to go into survival mode as I entered the room. I hunched as I felt my world shrink, and I tried to look purposeful, even though I’d instantly forgotten some of the simple tasks assigned to me. I felt no impulse to smile, interact with Mary or Erin, or feel anything but a narrow, tunnel-like focus.

It was hard to imagine that just the night before, I was riding a rocket of a horse in a community parade, outwardly waving and laughing. That extroverted person was gone, and in her place was someone who shuffled instead of walked, set the table with a towel instead of a tablecloth, and asked for help but ignored the answer.

Afterward, the facilitator went over how the simulation enhanced each of our unique character traits to give us an intimate, introspective glimpse into what our own life might look like if we were diagnosed. I realized the effects of the disease could make a once big world feel very small, and for someone who’s normally independent and active, how depressing that could become.

Thanking Melissa, the 3 of us started to leave, but Erin turned back. “I need to go see my grandma,” she said, and I wished I could hug mine, who passed long ago from the disease.

As a community liaison for Health Alliance, I have participated in both the Wenatchee and Moses Lake Walks to End Alzheimer’s that advocate a cure and honor loved ones. Much like my virtual experience, these events generate empathy, inspire, and give us the energy to make a difference.

It’s not too early to form a team for a walk in September. Visit alz.org/walk to find a walk near you. And for more information on the Virtual Dementia Tour in North Central Washington, please contact Melissa at Highgate Wenatchee at 509-665-6695 or Laurie at Summerwood Alzheimer’s Special Care Center in Moses Lake at 509-764-1900.

Shannon Sims is a Medicare community liaison for Health Alliance, serving Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan counties in Washington. She has four sons and two grandsons. During her time off, she performs as part of a rodeo drill team on her horse, Skeeter.

Avoiding Food Allergies for Food Allergy Awareness Week

Food Allergy Awareness Week 2016

This week is Food Allergy Awareness Week, so we’re bringing you facts about food allergies each day. Learn more.

Food Allergy Breakdown

 

Bodily Reaction

 

Milk and Egg Allergies

 

Allergy Signs and Symptoms

 

Treating a Reaction

 

Cleaning Surfaces

 

Cooking for Those with Food Allergies

 

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Checkup for Thyroid Awareness Month

Thyroid Awareness Month

January is Thyroid Awareness Month. Do you know how important your thyroid is?

The Importance of Your Thyroid

 

About 1% of Americans will develop enlarged thyroids, and it affects  5-10 times more women than men.

Women and Thyroid Problems

 

Most of the 30 million people with a thyroid condition don’t produce enough of the thyroid hormone.

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Thyroid cancer can be painless and without symptoms. Learn more to protect yourself.

Thyroid Cancer Danger

 

To find thyroid problems and cancer early, learn how to do this simple Neck Check self-exam.

It’s extremely important to take care of the thyroid during pregnancy and infancy. Why?

Your Thyroid During Pregnancy

 

Medication adherence is key for those with hypothyroidism. MyPillCheck can help.

Taking Your Thyroid Meds

 

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Stop the Tossing and Turning

My Healthy Journey: Finding Time for Sleep

It’s been a busy year for my team at Health Alliance, so I hope you’ve been enjoying Nicole’s Chasing Health series while I’ve been too busy to post!

When life gets busy and stress takes over, the first thing that always goes for me is sleep. I’ve never been very good at getting a lot of it, even though it’s one of my favorite things in the world, especially when stress sets in.

Unfortunately, that’s not doing my health any favors:

The Dangers of Sleep Deprivation
Image via Mind Body Green

And since stress and being too busy already make some of these things worse, like my mood and healthy eating flying out the window, not getting enough sleep on top of all that is not good.

Not to mention that it’s definitely not helping my work:

What Happens When Your Brain Doesn't Sleep?
Image via Science.Mic

The moral is clearly that sometimes, you have to make taking care of yourself a priority, which is unfortunately easier said than done.

Rally, our online wellness tool, can help by offering missions that help you get 7 to 8 hours of sleep, stick to a bedtime, start a bedtime ritual, and sleep better.

As for me, what can I do to get better sleep?

I’m taking notes from this video and this handy list of 27 Easy Ways to Sleep Better Tonight from Greatist.

  • Start a bedtime routine. I used to have one, but that’s all but disappeared the last 6 months. I need to start again, and I’m going to try adding drinking something warm (and decaffeinated) to that schedule.
  • Listen to soothing music. Normally, I leave something playing on Netflix as I fall asleep, but soothing music or a sound machine, without the light, would be a much better idea. Maybe I can make use of Adele’s new album or apps like Rain, Rain, which makes thunderstorm noises.
  • Cut back on electronics. This and making my bed a work-free zone are nearly impossible for me, but I do need to work on cutting back. Setting a curfew when I set down my phone or laptop, like at least a half hour before bed, could really help.
  • Make your bed cozy. I mentioned this in my resolutions for this year, but I’ve just gotten around to digging out my cozy stuff for this winter.

A Cozy Bed

  • Make up for lost sleep. Adding an extra hour when I didn’t get enough sleep the night before could help me with my sleep debt.
  • Don’t toss and turn. I do this a lot, and if I can’t fall asleep for more than 20 minutes, I should try getting up and doing something relaxing (NOT work), like knitting or reading.

One thing I can tell you I won’t be trying off this list? Kicking my pet out of my bed.

While I know this must be a problem for some people, I don’t think it’s a problem for me. And I’m not alone. A new study finds that 41% of people think having their pet in the room helps them sleep better.

I know that I would worry about her if she wasn’t in my room. Plus, cuddling her is about the most relaxing activity in my life. In fact, that’s frequently how I fall asleep now. I mean, how can you resist that?

Sleepy Tootsie

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