Tag Archives: animals

Animal Poison Prevention

Animal Poison Prevention

It’s National Animal Poison Prevention Week, and there are ways for you to protect your pets, especially in your home.

Not all food you eat is safe for your pets. Don’t give your pets chocolate, onion, garlic, coffee, avocados, raisins or grapes.

Feeding Pets Smart

 

You should also never give your pets fruit pits, like peach pits, or any bones, which can splinter and damage their digestive system.

Smart Snacking for Pets

 

Store your pets’ medications somewhere separate from your own so you never accidentally give them human meds.

Pet Medication Storage

 

Make sure your meds are stored in a secure place so your pets can never accidentally get into them.

Protecting Your Pets from Your Meds

 

Always keep cleaning supplies in a secure place that your pets can’t get to. These chemicals can be very harmful for them.

Cleaning and Your Pets

 

Make sure your pets can’t get to batteries, potpourri, yarn, rubber bands, or floss in your home, all of which can be harmful.

Also protect pets from insecticides, antifreeze, plant food and fertilizer outside. And know which plants are poisonous to them.

Protecting Pets from Poisoning

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Protecting Your Pets for Christmas

Holiday Pet Safety

You may not have realized that the holidays can be a dangerous time for your furry friends, but these holiday pet safety tips can help.

Make sure your Christmas tree is anchored so it can’t tip and fall when your pets jostle it.

Christmas tree water may contain fertilizers and is a breeding ground for bacteria, which can cause upset stomachs in pets.

Christmas Trees and Your Pets

 

Avoid mistletoe and holly. Holly causes nausea in pets, and mistletoe upsets their stomachs and can cause heart problems.

Avoiding Poisonous Christmas Plants

 

Kitties love sparkly tinsel, but when they nibble on it, it can cause blocked digestive tracts, which can lead to expensive surgery.

Protecting Playful Kitties

 

Keep wires and glass and plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach to avoid electric shocks and cuts to feet and mouths.

Curious Kittens and Ornaments

 

Make sure batteries aren’t left in pets’ reach. They can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus when punctured.

Toy Safety Around Pets

 

As you count down to the new year, avoid confetti strings, which can get stuck in pets’ intestines, and noise poppers and fireworks around timid pets.

Fighting Pet Fear

World Antibiotic Awareness Week

World Antibiotic Awareness Week

It’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week. Why should you care about antibiotic resistance?

Why It Matters

 

Reasons for the world antibiotic resistance crisis include:

  • Patients not finishing their full course of antibiotics

What You Can Do as a Patient

 

  • Health workers over-prescribing antibiotics

What You Can Do as a Health Worker

 

  • The overuse of antibiotics in livestock and fish farming

What You Can Do as a Part of Agriculture

 

  • Poor infection control in hospitals and clinics

How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads

 

  • Lack of hygiene and poor sanitation

What You Can Do as a Policy Maker

 

  • Lack of new antibiotics being developed

WHO_HWC_ 6x infographics_22.10.15

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Flaming Hot

Hot Enough

There’s a good reason to make sure you’re always cooking your meat to the right temps: foodborne illness.

Foodborne illness, or food poisoning, is when you eat or drink foods that are contaminated by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or even poisonous chemicals. There are more than 250 different foodborne illnesses. The top 5 are the most dangerous.

Myths vs. Facts

Myth: Food poisoning is rare and not that serious.

Facts:

Foodborne Illness Stats
Statistics via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Myth: I will know if I have food poisoning.

Facts: Food poisoning is often blamed on things like “a stomach bug,” but it can have many symptoms.

The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, and diarrhea. You could experience all of these or just one. It really depends on what caused it.

Myth: This happened because my food was dirty.

Facts: There are lots of reasons this can happen.

Fresh fruit and veggies can be contaminated if they’re washed in tainted water or touched by unwashed hands or sick people who help process the food.

Some healthy animals have certain kinds of bacteria to help their digestion. These can come in contact with the meat you eat during processing. Salmonella, one of the most dangerous foodborne illnesses, can infect a hen so that its eggs are infected from the start.

Leaving raw food to thaw out of the fridge or leaving cooked food out for too long, like at a potluck or BBQ, can let bacteria grow.

Food coming into contact during cooking with raw meats or dirty cutting boards and knives can spread the bacteria to things that were clean!

What Should I Do?

First, make sure you’re washing your fruits and veggies after you buy them and storing things safely.

Heat can kill bacteria, so always make sure you cook your food to the right temperature. You can do this by using a food thermometer.

Place the thermometer in the thickest part of the food, but it shouldn’t be touching bone or fat. Check the temp toward the end of cooking but before you think it will be done. And make sure to clean it well with hot, soapy water between each use.

Use these handy guides to cook and grill your food to safe temperatures:

Meat & Poultry Temperature Guide
Image via Food Network

 

Grill Master Guide
Image via Visual News

Up Next:

Wondering how long your food is actually good for? We can help make sense of all those dates!

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Season of Giving Presents

Season of Giving

While it’s getting down to the wire to give to a Christmas charity, it’s never too late for giving. Donate to one of these organizations that works year-round.

UNICEF strives to help children around the world all the time. Learn more about them and give this holiday season!

It’s not too late to adopt your kids a pet for Christmas! Help an animal or just give at the American Humane Society.

Adopt an animal with the World Wildlife Fund and teach your kids about protecting them around the world.

Make-A-Wish International helps give joy to sick kids around the world all-year. Donate today!

Direct Relief helps people around the world, particularly in emergencies, like Ebola. Deliver a world of good!

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital works to treat and cure the diseases that hurt our kids most. Help them operate.

The United Nations Foundation has campaigns to help people around the world. This holiday season, choose a good cause.

Hoarding Warning Signs

Warning Signs of Hoarding

What Is Hoarding?

Lately, it seems like almost every cable TV channel has a show about hoarding and people who live in less-than-great conditions because they can’t let go of anything, even trash.

While these people represent extreme cases, even mild hoarding can be a problem. As we get older, we tend to hang onto things. This often creates dangerous living areas, especially for seniors who have issues with balance and falling.

Clutter can also lead to other problems. It makes it harder to keep track of things you need like bills, meds, keys, and contact info for your friends and loved ones.

People with hoarding disorders usually save things because they believe these things will be needed in the future, they have emotional significance, and because having these things makes them feel safer and more secure. Because of this, it’s very different than collecting, when people careful find and display special items, like stamps or model cars.

Hoarding animals is one of the most dangerous forms of hoarding. Pets in these situations often aren’t cared for properly, which is dangerous for them and for you because of the unsanitary conditions this can lead to.

Signs of Hoarding

    • Cluttered living spaces, especially when it stops you from being able to use rooms for their intended purposes, like not being able to cook in the kitchen.
    • Extreme attachment to unimportant objects.
    • Letting trash build up to an unhealthy level.
    • Keeping stacks of newspapers and junk mail, or collecting lots of useless items.
    • Moving items from one pile to another without ever throwing anything away.
    • Trouble making decisions about and organizing your stuff.
    • Having a hard time letting others touch or borrow your things.
    • Embarrassment over your home.
    • Limited social interactions.

Getting Help

But hoarding is a treatable mental illness. Therapy where you talk with a doctor and certain drugs, usually ones used for depression, can help. Sticking to a treatment plan made with your doctor and support groups can also help you avoid hoarding.

You can also get help cleaning out your home with organizers, local assistance, or your friends and family. And you may find you have a lot of great things that you could donate to make someone else’s life better.

If hoarding affects you or someone you love, talk to your doctor as soon as possible. They can help you find a therapist who can work with you to make a treatment plan and recommend resources to help you clean up the clutter.